Quick Clicks> Boardwalk, High-Speed, Archives 2.0, the Street

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Wednesday, April 6, 2011
.

Wood is good, say residents of Coney Island of their historic boardwalk (Courtesy Intiaz/Flickr).

Boardwalk Empire. The Brooklyn Paper reports that Coney Island will not be getting a concrete boardwalk, at least not if Community Board 13 has a say in the matter. The board members recently voted down a proposal from the Parks Department that would cement over parts of the historic Riegelmann Boardwalk while covering some of the famed seaside path with recycled plastic lumber.

Express Train. The Van Alen Institute wants to know what you think of the future of high-speed rail in the United States. Check out its call for design ideas here.

Digital Architectural History. The Chicago Tribune’s Blair Kamen brings news that the good folks at the Ryerson and Burnham Archives at the Art Institute of Chicago have digitized 5,000 images from Archpaper’s late 19th century predecessor, the Inland Architect and News Record, offering up photos and drawings from a pivotal period in US architectural history.

Sharing is Caring. New York’s Municipal Art Society kicked off its second annual “Streets Month” with a program about the city’s new and innovative place-making efforts, including a presentation by DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. Check out a recap and analysis from MAS over here.

 

Quick Clicks> Cabrini Lights Up, Earth Powers Down, Calming Queens, and Starchitect Houses

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Monday, March 28, 2011
.
Chicago's last Cabrini Green high rise will be lit up before demolition (Courtesy Project Cabrini Green)

Chicago's last Cabrini Green high rise will be lit up before demolition (Courtesy Project Cabrini Green)

Cabrini Green Kablooey. This Wednesday, the last high rise tower at Chicago’s Cabrini Green site will be demolished, marking the end of the famous housing project. Polis reminds us that artist Jan Tichy and social worker Efrat Appel plan to mark the occasion with an art installation. Project Cabrini Green translates 134 poems into light and will begin display at 7:00pm tonight. (Also catch a live internet feed here.)

Earth Hour. This past weekend, people, companies, and cities all over the globe celebrated Earth Hour by switching off the lights to spotlight issues of energy consumption. The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture is running a photo essay of some dramatic skylines with and without lights.

Parking lanes planned along 48th Avenue (Courtesy NYCDOT via StreetsBlog)

Parking lanes planned along 48th Avenue (Courtesy NYCDOT via StreetsBlog)

Calming Queens. StreetsBlog brings news of New York’s latest traffic calming measure proposed for 48th Avenue and 44th Drive in Queens. The block shown above in Long Island City would initially be painted for affordability and eventually transformed into a greenway.

Cribs. Inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House, Curbed goes in search of the homes of famous architects. Represented in the list are Alvar Aalto, Frank Gehry, Norman Foster, and Robert A.M. Stern.

Quick Clicks> Vital Arts, Freeway Down, Arguing Art, and Metro Card Art

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Tuesday, March 22, 2011
.
Dallas Arts District (Photo by Iwan Baan via Cityscapes)

Dallas Arts District (Photo by Iwan Baan via Cityscapes)

District Review. Blair Kamin reports on the Dallas Arts District – the nation’s largest contiguous urban arts district – and finds the architecture inspiring but the street life a bore. In an area where Pritzker-winning architecture abounds, can a new park and residential development create urban vitality?

Freeway Down. NPR reports on the mainstreaming of highway teardowns across the country. With skyrocketing infrastructure costs, many cities find removing a mega-road is more affordable while preserving neighborhood character and spurring new business.

Public Art Confidential. WNYC takes a look at the story of public art in New York and the controversy that can follow as times and values change. Dueling sides argue the benefits of provoking thought on difficult subjects versus giving artwork an appropriate stage to do so. Among the eight most contested statues in New York is the long-toppled King George III once located in Bowling Green.

Multi-Use Metro Cards. Subway Art Blog has a pair of recent galleries showing how you can reuse your old Metro Cards, either by adding to your wardrobe or creating collage artwork.

Quick Clicks> Frank′s Party, Little Cooper, Gaudi′s Church, and Carnegie Saved

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Monday, March 21, 2011
.
Frank Gehry with his birthday cake.

Frank Gehry with his birthday cake.

Happy Birthday, Frank! Over the weekend, Frank Gehry celebrated his 82nd birthday on top of New York. New York by Gehry, that is. The penthouse unit on the 76th floor of 8 Spruce Street, Gehry’s first skyscraper, was filled with celebrities (think Bono) and starchitects (Robert A.M. Stern and more). Check out a gallery after the jump.

Little House on the Bowery. Fred Bernstein writes for Design Observer about a little brick house at the center of a giant preservation fight along New York’s Bowery. The demolition has been stopped for now, but Bernstein argues that the building’s real value is in the present, not in its history.

All in the Familia. Oscar Tusquets Blanca writes for Domus about Antoni Gaudí’s under construction Segrada Família in Barcelona. Blanca recalls, interspersed with some amazing photography, when he once advocated abandoning the project decades ago but points out how is opinion has changed today.

Carnegie Wrecking Ball. Ephemeral New York reminds us of a one-time plan to raze the famed Carnegie Hall for a bright red skyscraper set behind a sunken plaza. The March 31, 1960 wrecking date was averted at the last minute by the efforts of the Committee to Save Carnegie Hall.

Check out Gehry’s birthday party after the jump.

Manufacturers Trust Gets Yellow Light

East, East Coast
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
.
Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

Manufacturers Trust Company Building in 1955 (Courtesy Municipal Art Society)

“Sometimes the best way to restore a historic structure is to reuse it.” The comment came from Landmarks Preservation Commissioner Robert Tierney at the conclusion of Tuesday’s landmarks hearing on revisions proposed by Vornado Realty for interiors of the recently landmarked Manufacturers Trust Building on Fifth Avenue. The statement summed up the mood of the commission with regard to changes in the space, originally designed by Gordon Bunschaft, which include dividing the first floor to make space for two retail tenants. Most of the commission picked apart the specifics while maintaining that the architects from SOM overseeing the renovation were generally on the right track.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Coops, Help Japan, Sidewalk Dining, and Rooftops

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Tuesday, March 15, 2011
.
Chicken Circus by Studio H via Jetson Green.

Chicken Circus by Studio H via Jetson Green.

Coop Moderne. Urban agriculture is all the rage lately, and with the backyard gardens come the chickens. Jetson Green offers a few examples of high-design chicken coops made of reclaimed materials by Studio H, a design-build program for high-school students in North Carolina.

Aid. Architecture for Humanity is working on plans to provide relief to victims of the Sendai earthquake and tsunami. The post-disaster reconstruction group is asking for donations now to they can build later. If you would like to support Japan more immediately, the Japanese Red Cross Society is also a good choice.

Al Fresco Forward. As the weather begins to warm, the New York DOT has announced that it’s pop-up cafe program is moving forward. Modeled after pop-up sidewalk cafes in San Francisco and other cities, New York tried out its first model in the Financial District last year. The planter-lined sidewalk extensions project six feet into the street and are paid for by sponsoring businesses. The Post has the list of DOT-approved restaurants in Soho, the Village, and elsewhere.

Rooftop Remix. Web Urbanist put together a collection modern rooftop additions from around the world by the likes of MVRDV, Coop Himmelb(l)au, and others. As Web Urbanist points out, the juxtapositions of the additions against their host structures is quite striking. (Via Planetizen.)

Prospect Park West Bike Lane Target of Lawsuit

East, East Coast
Thursday, March 10, 2011
.
Dedicated bike lane along Brooklyn's Prospect Park West (Courtesy Steven Vance)

Dedicated bike lane along Brooklyn's Prospect Park West (Courtesy Steven Vance)

That thin ribbon of green paint along Brooklyn’s Prospect Park West sure is a touchy subject for residents of the Park Slope neighborhood, and beyond–they’re even talking about it in London. Many love the new separated bike lane installed in June 2010–the “pro-laners”–but a vocal group packing some political power would rather see the lane removed–the “anti-laners.”

Read More

Quick Clicks>Trucking, Biking, Leaking, Exploring

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
.

Jaime Oliver's Food Revolution Truck debuted at TED and hit the highways.

Iron skillet meets iron fist. Some of the most striking visuals to come out of this year’s TED conference weren’t made for the stage but for the street: Jamie Oliver‘s Food Revolution truck, an 18-wheeled kitchen classroom designed pro bono by Rockwell Group, launched last week and represents just one of the outcomes of Oliver’s 2010 TED Prize wish to make kids healthier. The wish of this year’s TED Prize winner, the artist currently known as “JR,” is that people will participate in his global art project INSIDE/OUT and help paper streets with gigantic portraits of themselves. Step 1: set up photo booths that print poster size pics of conference participants–quite a surreal experience, writes Guy Horton for Good.

Get over it. So says the New Republic to New Yorkers who complain that New York DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan has stepped on some toes in her quest to make streets slimmer, bike lanes fatter, and pedestrians safer. The griping was highlighted in a March 4 profile of the commissioner in the New York Times.

Leaky legend. The Economist reports that Taliesin, Frank Lloyd Wright‘s home and studio in Spring Green, Wisconsin, is banking on this year’s 100th anniversary of the site to raise money for much-needed restoration work: the roof is leaking, the wood beams are sagging, and families of bats keep trying to settle down in the rafters.

Urban archaeology, armchair edition. Yurbanism rounds up new apps that are sure to appeal to urbanists, like “Abandoned,” which uses GPS to identify abandoned buildings near your location, complete with links to pics: “Explore modern day ruins from empty mental asylums to shipwrecks under the Great Lakes. Discover the history and location of dead amusement parks, overgrown hospitals, forgotten hotels and creepy ghost towns.”

Quick Clicks> Floating, Ethics, Mansard Roofs, Transit Saves

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Monday, March 7, 2011
.
A recreation of the Pixar film Up (National Geographic)

A recreation of the Pixar film Up (National Geographic)

Up, Up & Away. My Modern Met has a photo set from National Geographic‘s recreation of the Pixar movie Up. With the help of 300 colorful weather balloons, a team of engineers and pilots sent a 16′ square house skyward in LA, setting a world record in the process. (Via Curbed.)

Archi-Ethics. Mark Lamster is leading this week’s Glass House Conversation. He’s discussing the ethics of client selection: “How do we balance commercial imperatives with a desire for a moral practice?”

Mansard Mania. The New York Times has a feature on Manhattan’s Mansard roof heyday between 1868 and 1873, spotlighting some of the best examples of the French-style roof.

Transit Saves. As civil unrest continues in the Middle East, oil prices have risen to near record levels. Reuters brings us a study from the American Public Transportation Association that finds transit riders are saving over $800 a month with the elevated gas costs, and projects nearly a $10,000 savings annually if gas maintains its high price tag.

Quick Clicks> Scanning, Aedas, Retro, Epic Growth

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Thursday, February 24, 2011
.

Mayor Bloomberg demonstrates how to scan QR codes on building permits. Photo: Edward Reed/flickr.

Vox populi. Complaining just got easier for neighborhood watchdogs in NYC. This week Mayor Bloomberg announced that building permits posted at construction sites will soon have QR (Quick Response) codes that can be scanned by smart phones. A wave of the wrist will bring up all the particulars of the construction site online and allow passers-by to report anything amiss or just find out more about project. More details about digitization of the buildings department on the mayor’s website.

Gardens grows. The Architect’s Journal reports that Aedas, Glenn Howells, and Jestico + Whiles have been selected to design the replacement for Robin Hood Gardens housing complex in east London. The plan for the £500 million development includes the demolition of the early 1970s buildings designed by Alison and Peter Smithson.

Midlife crisis. Owners of mid-century modern homes in Massachusetts are retrofitting aging residences designed by TAC and other firms, equipping them for the future and saving them from the wrecking ball in the process, writes Kathleen Burge in the Boston Globe.

Before and after, epic version. Web Urbanist presents the rise of the modern metropolis through a series of eye-popping images. (Shenzen, China wins for most dramatic transformation, while New York 1954 and New York 2009 look eerily similar.)

Quick Clicks> Apples, Trains, Fields, Banks

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Friday, February 18, 2011
.

Grand Central to get Apple but no glass cube. flickr/Randy Le'Moine

Apple takes another bite. Once famous for its oysters, Grand Central will now be known for its Apples. Cult of Mac reports that the computer giant plans to open their biggest retail outlet yet, which will, no doubt be as busy as Grand Central Station.

High speed posturing. If you don’t want it, we’ll take it! That’s the message being sent out by Democratic governors to their Republican counterparts who are rejecting infrastructure dollars. Huff-Po’s Sam Stein notes that governors from New York, Washington, and California are lining up to take Florida Governor Rick Scott’s rejected $2 billion in federal funding for high speed rail line.

Goal! One more hurdle to go. DNA reports that Columbia’s Baker Field got the green light from the City Planning Commission to build the Steven Holl designed Campbell Sports Center.  Part of the plan includes a James Corner/Field Operations-designed park and 17,000 square feet of restored marsh and shoreline.

Pool Hall Banking. A 1916 bank building on Philadelphia’s Chestnut Street will take on an adaptive reuse that its architect Horace Trumbauer surely never dreamed of. PlanPhilly reports that  developer Paul Giegerich is thinking of turning the architect’s two story cathedral of commerce into a swanky pool hall with food created by a star (Steven Starr to be exact).

MoMA/P.S. 1 Young Architects Program Winner Announced

East, East Coast, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 16, 2011
.
Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

P.S. 1 and the Museum of Modern Art have just announced that Brooklyn-based urban design and planning firm Interboro Partners are the winners of the 2011 Young Architects Program. Now celebrating its 12th year, the honor means designing what by now is widely recognized as the liveliest party space of the summer, the outdoor plaza of P.S. 1 in Queens.

Read more after the jump.

Page 2 of 1912345...10...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License