Milwaukee pushes urban agriculture for vacant land

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is pushing a plan to turn parcels of city-owned vacant land into urban farms and orchards. The HOME GR/OWN program has long been stalled, but received a boost from the Bloomberg Mayors Challenge.

Continue reading after the jump.

Can a Canadian Furniture Magnate Save Citi Bike?

Citi Bikes docked in NYC. (SLGCKGC / FLICKR)

Citi Bikes docked in NYC. (SLGCKGC / FLICKR)

Given the past few weeks of Citi Bike news, the events that played out over last weekend shouldn’t come as a surprise. But, alas, they do. Bixi— the bankrupt Montreal company behind Citi Bike‘s glitchy equipment—was purchased by, who else, a Canadian furniture magnate named Bruno Rodi. Yes, the man whose company sells living-room furniture and bills itself as the “spécialiste du sofa” will himself become the “spécialiste du vélo.”

It gets stranger after the jump.

Before & After> Gustafson Guthrie Nichol Imagines a Pedestrian-Friendly Seattle

seattle-streetscape-01bseattle-streetscape-01a

The streets of downtown Seattle are set for a major overhaul, thanks to a new masterplan by Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. As AN reported in our recent West Coast edition, the Seattle-based firm has made recommendations to improve the pedestrian realm “centers on uniting the fragmented parts of the Pike-Pine corridor, two major thoroughfares at the heart of the retail core running east-west from Interstate 5 to the waterfront.”

Check out their dramatic proposed transformations overlayed on Seattle’s existing streetscape for a better look at how pedestrians and cyclists will fare under the plan.

More after the jump.

“Transit Future” Wish List Tantalizes Chicago Commuters with $20 Billion in Improvements

Cook County President Toni Preckwinkle speaking at the Transit Future campaign press conference. (Steven vance)

Cook County President Toni Preckwinkle speaking at the Transit Future campaign press conference. (Steven vance)

Here’s something to meditate on the next time you see three Chicago Transit Authority buses leapfrogging one another on a crowded street, or have to shell out for a cab because the trains won’t get you where you want to go on time: a grand proposal called “Transit Future” that seeks to improve the way Chicagoans get around the region.

Continue reading after the jump.

vision42design Competition Asks Designers to Re-Imagine 42nd Street Without Cars

(Courtesy Vision 42)-2

(Courtesy vision42)

The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility is hosting the just-announced vision42design Competition calling on architects, designers, and transportation gurus to re-imagine one of the most iconic (and congested) streets in New York City—42nd Street. Submit your plans today to transform the street into a world-class boulevard complete with a high-quality public spaces and a light-rail tram. In addition to the $10,000 winner’s prize, the jury’s top selected projects will be featured in The Architect’s Newspaper. For more info and to register visit the competition website. Registration Deadline: Sept 8, 2014 (Midnight) EST

Citibank’s Elyssa Gray Extols Citi Bike As Difficulties Loom

City Terrain, East, Transportation
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
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Though dark clouds appear to be gathering, Citigroup is just peachy about the nearly year-old bike share program that bears their name. The financial corporation pledged $41 million to the initiative, allowing it to launch without a dime of public money. At the Ad Age Digital Conference, Elyssa Gray, director of creative media for North American marketing at Citibank, gushed about the popularity of the program and suggested that the bank is starting to recoup some of its investment. Ms. Gray revealed $4.4 million in earned media since Citi Bike’s launch and sizable growth in brand preference. Despite these indications of profitability for Citi, the program’s ultimate fate will depend on its ability to translate its much-lauded usage into self-sustaining revenue.

Robson Redux Competition Brings a New Summer Plaza to Vancouver

robsonredux1_archpaper

2014 Entry into Robson Redux (Courtesy VIVA Vancouver)

For the fourth year running, Robson Street in downtown Vancouver will play host to a public art project designed to enhance people’s connection to one another and people’s connection to the space. The brief for “Robson Redux “entails transforming a street that acts largely as a pedestrian thoroughfare into something more akin to a plaza or city square for the coming summer months. On today, April 15th, a jury will select one of the 79 entries to build and install in time for Canada Day (July 1st for those not in the know).

Past winners after the jump.

New York City’s Vision Zero Arrives on Atlantic Avenue with “Arterial Slow Zones”

DOT Commissioner Trottenberg Announces Atlantic Avenue "Slow Zone." (Flickr / NYC DOT)

DOT Commissioner Trottenberg Announces Atlantic Avenue “Slow Zone.” (Flickr / NYC DOT)

Vision Zero is coming to Brooklyn and Queens‘ Atlantic Avenue. Nearly eight miles of the notoriously dangerous thoroughfare will be transformed into the first of 25 planned “arterial slow zones.” Last Wednesday—at the busy corner of Atlantic and Washington avenues—Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announced that the city is taking immediate steps to save lives by reducing the street’s speed limit from 30MPH to 25.

More after the jump.

Designed in Chicago, Made in China: Blair Kamin, Chicago designers mull Chinese urbanization

Chinese new year flags and lanterns in Shenzhen, the poster-city for rapid urbanization in China. (Flickr / dcmaster)

Chinese new year flags and lanterns in Shenzhen, the poster-city for rapid urbanization in China. (Flickr / dcmaster)

Blair Kamin convened a panel of designers at the Chicago Architecture Foundation last Wednesday for a discussion around themes explored in his recent series “Designed in Chicago, Made in China,” in which the Chicago Tribune architecture critic assessed the effects of that country’s rapid development on urbanism and design. Read More

Rebuild By Design> BIG’s “BIG U” for Lower Manhattan

The "Big U" wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

The “Big U” wraps around Battery Park. (Courtesy BIG)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s BIG’s “Big U” that could save Lower Manhattan from the next superstorm.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> OMA’s Plans to Protect Coastal New Jersey

Aerial rendering of OMA's plan. (Courtesy OMA)

Aerial rendering of OMA’s plan. (Courtesy OMA)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s OMA‘s plan to protect The Garden State’s coast.

See the plan after the jump.

Apple to build a new transportation center and increase shuttle service

Apple logo via Flickr by Incase

Apple logo (Flickr by Incase)

Like many major tech companies in Silicon Valley, Apple provides free transportation for its employees living in the Bay Area. About 28 percent of Apple employees do not drive to work, instead taking employer-owned biodiesel shuttles, biking, or walking. In an effort to bring that percentage up to 34 percent (a figure that will help get their new Norman Foster–designed campus in Cupertino approved), the company is expanding its fleet of buses and building a dedicated transportation center.

Continue reading after the jump.

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