Unveiled> Norman Foster’s New Plans for the Norton Museum of Art in Palm Beach

East, Unveiled
Thursday, December 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

The Norton Museum of Art in Palm Beach, Florida has unveiled a new master plan including galleries and public spaces designed by architecture firm Foster + Partners, under the direction of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Lord Norman Foster. The new Foster design will upgrade the museums 6.3-acre, art deco–inspired campus and gardens first designed in 1941 by Marion Sims Wyeth.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Artists Helping Defy Philly’s Second City Status in “Citywide” Exhibition

East
Friday, November 22, 2013
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1/16th scale model

1/16th scale model

It has long seemed that Philadelphia’s cultural community was destined to exist forever in New York’s shadow. Though it has had through its history great flourishes of home-grown creativity from Thomas Eakins and Frank Furness, great institutions like The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art and collections like the Barnes Foundation and the Annenberg. These were still not enough to overcome its “second city” status to its neighbor up the Jersey Turnpike.

But now Philadelphia seems to embracing its outsider status as an anti-New York where artists and can actually afford to live and start up collective galleries and exhibit spaces.

More after the jump.

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On View> Glen Small In Recovery Opens In Los Angeles On November 9

On View, West
Friday, November 8, 2013
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03-glen-small-exhibit-archpaper

The West Coast architect Glen Small has now been largely forgotten, but from the 1960s through the 1980s he was at the center of architectural experimentation and ecological consciousness in California. His journey from an early founder of SCI-Arc and a pioneer of Califorinia environmentalism was documented in a biopic My Father, The Genius made by his talented film maker daughter Lucia Small.

Continue reading after the jump.

Charity Building A New School for Underserved Zambian Village

International
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Ennead Lab)

(Courtesy Ennead Lab)

Chipakata is small rural Zambian community with no local school so its children have to walk five miles to an overcrowded facility. But Joseph Mizzi, president of Sciame Construction, visited the village last year with New York City–based stylist and native-Zambian, Nchimunya Wulf. They both were inspired to start a non-profit to build a new school for the community. The duo launched the 14+ Foundation last June and after a fundraiser that garnered $350,000 for the organization to pit together a group of New York–based design professionals who are building a brand new facility in the heart of Chipakata.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rick Cook of COOKFOX Discusses His Proposed Building Along the High Line

East
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
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(Courtesy DBOX)

(Courtesy DBOX)

A new “class A” office building adjacent to the High Line, 510 West 22nd Street, is now in the planning stage and the developers have released a video of its designer, Rick Cook of COOKFOX Architects, describing the building. But is anyone worried that the High Line may become a dark walkway through forest of buildings? Not Cook, who bases his design on the public qualities of the old elevated rail line that transformed 10th Avenue from the “end of the world to the center of the universe.” But has there been a bigger boon to real estate development in New York since Central Park?

New York Post on Politically-Charged Public Space and Priestly Palaces

City Terrain, East, International
Thursday, October 24, 2013
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A pedestrian plaza in Manhattan. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

A pedestrian plaza in Manhattan. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

We don’t normally look to the New York Post for stories on architecture and planning. But while getting our shoes shined for tonights black tie Heritage Ball we had a chance to read the paper’s Late City Final. There in the middle of stories on JonBenet Ramsey, a lawyer “ripping a Jet Slugger,” and Lady Gaga’s thigh tattoo was a smattering of the latest in design spectacle.

Next to a story on Mitt Romney’s new 5,900 square foot “secret hideout” in Holiday, Utah (which will apparently feature a bookcase that swivels open and leads into hidden room), there is a long story on Midtown Manhattan street plazas that both Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota are apparently thinking of “yanking…out,” according to the paper.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Sorkin Salutes Lebbeus Woods, Marshall Berman at National Design Awards

National
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
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Michael Sorkin. (Courtesy National Design Awards)

Michael Sorkin. (Courtesy National Design Awards)

In AN‘s recent article on the winners of this year’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Awards, we mentioned that Michael Sorkin accepted his award for “Design Mind” with a powerful tribute—as only he can—to his late friends and intellectual mentors, Lebbeus Woods and Marshall Berman. Sorkin, like the other awardees, was only allowed a 2 minute acceptance speech, which he has shared with AN. Read the statement in full below.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wines, Gang, Sorkin Among Honorees at 2013 National Design Awards

East
Friday, October 18, 2013
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(Courtesy National Design Awards)

Tom Wolfe, sitting, and James Wines, standing. (Courtesy National Design Awards)

When an artist begins,
     they try to bury him with neglect.
When he gains a small foothold,
     they try to bury him with criticism.
When he becomes more established,
     they try to bury him with covetous disdain.
When he becomes exceptionally successful,
     they try to bury him with dismissals as irrelevant.
And finally, all else failing
     they try to bury him with honors!

This is how James Wines of SITE, quoting Jean Cocteau, accepted his 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum at their National Design Awards. Wines joined a ‘Lifetime Achievement’ group that includes Richard Saul Wurman, Bill Moggridge, Paolo Solari, the Vignelli’s, Dan Kiley, and Frank Gehry.

Last night’s awards program was a special one as the Museum—led by its new director, Caroline Baumann, and an indefatigable team—worked throughout the government shutdown of the least two weeks to put on a spatular gala that gave awards to designers that included Janette Sadik-Khan, Michael Sorkin, Studio Gang Architects, Paula Scher, Aidlin Darling Design, and Margie Ruddick.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> An Olfactory Archive: Something Smells at the California College of the Arts

Other
Thursday, October 10, 2013
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An Olfactory Archive: 1100-1969. (Courtesy CCA)

An Olfactory Archive. (Courtesy CCA)

The architecture school at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco was only founded in 1986 and did not have its own campus until 1997. But the school—housed in a light filled old bus shed in the city’s Potrero Hill Design District—is quickly carving out a unique role for itself as a center of architectural creativity and pedagogy. The College, with its dynamic president and acting director of architecture David Gissen, seems to be trying to work forward from its Arts and Crafts traditions (the CCA itself was founded in 1907 in Oakland) but link up with the vibrant and young tech industries and attitude that proliferate in this south of Market area. A sign of this new spirit is a small but fascinating exhibit, An Olfactory Archive: 1738-1969, curated by Gissen and new faculty member Irene Cheng and designed by Brian Price and Matt Hutchinson.

Read More

Celebrating Design Monterey Style

West
Friday, October 4, 2013
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MDC_LOGO-SIG3-designed by Rebeca Mendez

Last weekend’s Monterey Design Conference had many special moments–beyond those spent walking the spectacular grounds of the Asilomar center on the Pacific ocean. The conference, which is essentially the bi-annual meeting of the California AIA, is trying to re-brand itself the “MDC” in hopes of encouraging the general public to attend. But the conference has been M.C.ed for the past dozen years by Robert Ivy, Chief Executive Officer of the AIA and once again he did a brilliant job (with help from Larry Scarpa) of keeping the event moving along between wine tastings, a small trade show and attendees’ desire to escape the darkened conference hall for a walk on the beach. Read More

Monterey Design Conference Kicks Off This Weekend at Scenic Asilomar

West
Friday, September 27, 2013
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Asilomar is hosting the 2013 Monterey Design Conference in California. (William Menking / AN)

Asilomar is hosting the 2013 Monterey Design Conference in California. (William Menking / AN)

The California AIA’s biennial Monterey Design Conference is on the next two days—September 27th and 28th—at Asilomar, the glorious Julia Morgan– and John Carl Warnecke–designed center on the Pacific Ocean in Pacific Grove. The conference will feature lectures by Thom Mayne, Marlon Blackwell, Thomas Phifer, Kengo Kuma, and AN board member Odile Decq.

But first up this morning was Greg Otto from Buro Happold who presented various Happold projects that were created using a multi-disciplinary approach and discussed design and legal issues around responsibility and how these “stress traditional design assumptions.” Otto also discussed his ongoing New York projects with Jeff Koons who wants to make large steel structures look “like marshmallows.”

Continue reading after the jump.

More Time with Norman, Please: Foster + Partners’ New Manhattan Tower Fails To Impress

East, Unveiled
Thursday, September 26, 2013
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Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster's 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson /  Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster’s 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson / Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Foster + Partners likes to think of itself as a high-design firm with glamorous projects all over the world. But the banal rendering accompanying this week’s announcement of a new 19-story, “luxury” residential tower, 551 West 21 Street, belies their design skills. Could it be that they have a two-tier design strategy in their office where glamorous cultural institutions get “Sir Norman” and commercial towers get, well, something less?

Continue reading after the jump.

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