On View> An Olfactory Archive: Something Smells at the California College of the Arts

Other
Thursday, October 10, 2013
.
An Olfactory Archive: 1100-1969. (Courtesy CCA)

An Olfactory Archive. (Courtesy CCA)

The architecture school at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco was only founded in 1986 and did not have its own campus until 1997. But the school—housed in a light filled old bus shed in the city’s Potrero Hill Design District—is quickly carving out a unique role for itself as a center of architectural creativity and pedagogy. The College, with its dynamic president and acting director of architecture David Gissen, seems to be trying to work forward from its Arts and Crafts traditions (the CCA itself was founded in 1907 in Oakland) but link up with the vibrant and young tech industries and attitude that proliferate in this south of Market area. A sign of this new spirit is a small but fascinating exhibit, An Olfactory Archive: 1738-1969, curated by Gissen and new faculty member Irene Cheng and designed by Brian Price and Matt Hutchinson.

Read More

Celebrating Design Monterey Style

West
Friday, October 4, 2013
.

MDC_LOGO-SIG3-designed by Rebeca Mendez

Last weekend’s Monterey Design Conference had many special moments–beyond those spent walking the spectacular grounds of the Asilomar center on the Pacific ocean. The conference, which is essentially the bi-annual meeting of the California AIA, is trying to re-brand itself the “MDC” in hopes of encouraging the general public to attend. But the conference has been M.C.ed for the past dozen years by Robert Ivy, Chief Executive Officer of the AIA and once again he did a brilliant job (with help from Larry Scarpa) of keeping the event moving along between wine tastings, a small trade show and attendees’ desire to escape the darkened conference hall for a walk on the beach. Read More

Monterey Design Conference Kicks Off This Weekend at Scenic Asilomar

West
Friday, September 27, 2013
.
Asilomar is hosting the 2013 Monterey Design Conference in California. (William Menking / AN)

Asilomar is hosting the 2013 Monterey Design Conference in California. (William Menking / AN)

The California AIA’s biennial Monterey Design Conference is on the next two days—September 27th and 28th—at Asilomar, the glorious Julia Morgan– and John Carl Warnecke–designed center on the Pacific Ocean in Pacific Grove. The conference will feature lectures by Thom Mayne, Marlon Blackwell, Thomas Phifer, Kengo Kuma, and AN board member Odile Decq.

But first up this morning was Greg Otto from Buro Happold who presented various Happold projects that were created using a multi-disciplinary approach and discussed design and legal issues around responsibility and how these “stress traditional design assumptions.” Otto also discussed his ongoing New York projects with Jeff Koons who wants to make large steel structures look “like marshmallows.”

Continue reading after the jump.

More Time with Norman, Please: Foster + Partners’ New Manhattan Tower Fails To Impress

East, Unveiled
Thursday, September 26, 2013
.
Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster's 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson /  Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster’s 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson / Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Foster + Partners likes to think of itself as a high-design firm with glamorous projects all over the world. But the banal rendering accompanying this week’s announcement of a new 19-story, “luxury” residential tower, 551 West 21 Street, belies their design skills. Could it be that they have a two-tier design strategy in their office where glamorous cultural institutions get “Sir Norman” and commercial towers get, well, something less?

Continue reading after the jump.

Lisbon Triennale’s Emphasis on Experimentation Offers A Path for Architects

International
Friday, September 20, 2013
.
(Fernando García-Dory)

(Fernando García-Dory)

The 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale‘s emphasis on active workshops, networking and “research” projects rather than architectural set pieces often plays as live performative tableaus. The public focus of the exhibition is indeed an elevated stage in the city’s Praca da Figueira (Square of the Fig Tree) where architects are performing plays, encouraging civic engagement with public performances, and programming research workshops. Performance is also the operative scheme in another triennial initiative, The Institute Effect, that takes place the city’s Museum of Design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Lisbon Triennale Shows Curators’ Push Toward Tactical Engagement

International
Thursday, September 19, 2013
.
(Frida Escobedo & Max Hooper Schneider)

(Frida Escobedo & Max Hooper Schneider)

I wrote in my first post from the Lisbon Architecture Triennale Close, Closer that it’s the first international exhibition that does not need or even want outside visitors. The exhibition’s organizer and head curator, Beatrice Galilee, downplays installations and object-making in favor of active workshops, networking, and “research” projects aimed primarily at residents of the Portuguese capital.

Continue reading after the jump.

A look at The Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Close, Closer

International
Friday, September 13, 2013
.

cardboard-jet-engine-01

The Lisbon Triennale, Close, Closer, is the first architecture exhibition that does not need, nor even want outside visitors. In recent years, the relevance of the international exposition in a defined physical boundary has been questioned, given the energy and expense (particularly in Venice) involved in putting the event together and the ubiquity of digital display and information dissemination. Why not, many people argue, just do the whole thing on line and open it up to the whole world rather than forcing visitors to trek to expensive cities and countries? Lisbon’s Close, Closer will have a tremendous online presence, but, more to the point, the curators of the exhibition, under the overall guidance of British curator Beatrice Galilee, have downplayed expensive formal installations in favor of workshop, networking, and research projects.

Read More

Filed Under: , ,

Stefan Behnisch Among Headliners at Facades+PERFORMANCE in Chicago

Midwest
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
.
Stefan Behnisch. (Christoph Soeder)

Stefan Behnisch. (Christoph Soeder)

AN‘s popular Facades+PERFORMANCE conference series is quickly becoming the most important event focused on the fast-paced changes taking place in facade technology. The two day conference and workshops, which has also taken place in San Francisco and New York City, is returning to Chicago on October 24th and 25th and will take place at Mies van der Rohe’s IIT campus with a cocktail reception to follow at Rem Koolhaas’ McCormick Tribune Campus Center.

The October 24th symposium will feature German architect Stefan Behnisch who has designed scores of major buildings in Europe and the United States and is known for this elegant, precise, and creative facades. His recently completed Law School for the University of Baltimore,for example, has a sophisticated glass and aluminum curtain wall with an extra layer of glass to reduce noise and horizontal sun shading. He will discuss this and many of his other projects at Facdes+PERFORMANCE in Chicago this October.

New Guide Offers an Insider’s Look at New York City’s Urban Landscapes

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, July 2, 2013
.
West Harlem Piers Park Credit. (Alison Cartwright)

West Harlem Piers Park Credit. (Alison Cartwright)

In just the nick of time for outdoor summer weekends in New York City, Norton Architecture and Design Books has released a Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes. It’s a concise and beautifully illustrated guide to thirty-eight public spaces that claims to be the “first wide-ranging survey of New York urban landscapes from the first half of the nineteenth century to, well, tomorrow.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Sou Fujimoto Awarded the Marcus Prize by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Sou Fujimoto. (David Vintiner)

Sou Fujimoto. (David Vintiner)

This had been a big year for 42-year-old Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto. He has been the focus of a special design charrette at Rome’s Maxxi Museum and then awarded the prestigious commission for the Serpentine Pavilion in London. Now he been awarded the 2013 Marcus Prize. The prize awarded by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture and supported but the Marcus Corporation Foundation is meant to recognize an architect “on a trajectory to greatness.”

Continue reading after the jump.

An Alternative Site for Madison Square Garden: Sorkin Studios’ Late Submission

East
Thursday, June 20, 2013
.
Sorkin's proposal to place Madison Square Garden atop Grand Central Terminal.

Sorkin’s proposal to place Madison Square Garden atop Grand Central Terminal.

The Municipal Art Society recently commissioned and released four versions of a re-imagined Penn Station. It commissioned Diller Scofidio + Renfro, H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, SHoP Architects, and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) to prepare drawings of what a new terminal would like for the busiest train station in the country.

It has now come to light that actually a fifth concept was prepared but not presented at MAS’s “press conference.” The design by the firm Michael Sorkin Studio builds on MAS’s legendary 1970s protest against the destruction of Grand Central Station. In that protest Jacqueline Onassis famously joined forces with other powerful Manhattanites to stop a proposed Marcel Breuer high rise slated to be built above and across the southern front of Grand Central.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tower Implosion Makes Way For Mountains on Governors Island

City Terrain, East
Monday, June 10, 2013
.

gov_imploded_01gov_imploded_02

It took only a few seconds for Building 877 on Governors Island—dynamited at various key points—to come crashing down in a pile of sand-colored dust (hopefully with no asbestos)! A group of about 150 lucky New Yorkers, including Raymond Gastil (heading back to his home in Seattle), Margaret Sullivan (H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture), Jonathan Marvel (Rogers Marvel Architects and one of the architect’s of the new Governors Island), Lance Brown, and The Guy Nordenson family, were invited to witness the “implosion” at 6:37a.m. on Sunday, June 9.

Videos and mountainous

Page 3 of 1612345...10...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License