Iconic works by Paul Rudolph to be celebrated in Sarasota, Florida

Architecture, East, On View, Preservation
Thursday, September 25, 2014
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Umbrella House after restoration. (Bill Miller)

Umbrella House after restoration. (Bill Miller)

In 1948, Paul Rudolph was residing at the American Academy in Rome. He had traveled there to study classical architecture, but was instead spending his days designing modern houses for Sarasota, Florida. In fact, Sarasota, according to Timothy Rohan who has recently published a monograph on Rudolph, made a huge impression on the architect and defined his work for the rest of his career. He had moved there to apprentice and work for the local architect Ralph Twitchell, who in the 1940s helped create a style of modern house that eventually became known as the Sarasota school.

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Architectural Record sold to West coast private equity group

Media, National, News
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
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arch-record-sold

Architectural Record along with its sister construction publication, Engineering News-Record, and other products, Dodge and Sweets, have been sold to Symphony Technology Group (STG), a “strategic private equity firm” in Palo Alto, California, for $320 million. McGraw Hill Construction, the current owner of these publications, announced in a market-jargon-filled press release today that, while there were multiple prospective buyers, they sold to STG because that company understands how to build on McGraw Hill’s “storied past of nimbly adapting to changing market conditions and pursuing new growth opportunities in the construction market.” STG has a global portfolio of 22 companies with a combined revenue of $2.7 billion and 17,000 employees. Will Cathleen Mcguigan and her editorial team be leaving their Pennsylvania Station tower for the green lawns of the Silicon Valley soon?

“Unsitely” explores how design can improve construction barricades

(Courtesy Unsitely)

(Courtesy Unsitely)

An upcoming Montreal colloquium, Unsitely: Leveraging Design to Improve Urban Construction Sites, will take on a seemingly small urban problem that, in fact, has a profound effect on the daily life of the city: the temporary barriers surrounding construction sites. The event will explore existing innovative design solutions and how these can revitalize streets, districts, or entire neighborhoods.

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Sou Fujimoto’s Marcus Prize Pavilion transforms brick into a playfully light material

Architecture, National, Newsletter
Monday, September 15, 2014
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(Courtesy University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

(Courtesy University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

The Marcus Prize is awarded bi-annually to an emerging architect in the early stages of his or her career. Hosted by the the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee School of Architecture & Urban Planning and supported by the Milwaukee-based Marcus Foundation, it has a record of supporting talented young practices before they become well know including: Winy Maas (2005), Frank Barkow (2007), Alejandro Aravena (2010), and Diebedo Francis Kere (2011).

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Tuesday> Reception at the Bronx Museum’s “Beyond the Supersquare” exhibition

East, On View
Wednesday, September 10, 2014
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supersquare

(Courtesy Bronx Museum)

Beyond the Supersquare: Art and Architecture in Latin America After Modernism at the Bronx Museum is the most exciting and challenging architecture and urbanism exhibit in New York at the moment. The focus of the exhibit is the influence modern architecture and architectural thought has had on contemporary art in the Caribbean and Latin America. But while it features the work of artists and not primarily architects, all the works selected by Bronx Museum Executive Director Holly Block and Independent Curator María Inés Rodriguez were chosen for their insights into architecture and the immediate challenges of the region’s exploding urbanism.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Registration extended for the vision42design competition

vision42-nyc

(Courtesy Vision42)

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City’s 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide.

 

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Late Summer Signings at Pratt Mark Beginning of Academic School Year

Dean's List, East, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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pratt

David Burney (left) and Sanford Kwinter (right).

It’s the end of summer and again time for architecture students and faculty to return to studios and classrooms all over the country. There are several new high profile architecture Deans facing their first week of dealing with academic regulations, nervous students, and lack of classroom space. In addition young new faculty are preparing for their first lectures and several well known senior faculty have transferred institutions. Pratt Institute for example, has just announced two high profile additions to its faculty.

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Reminder: Registration ends soon for the vision42design competition

(Courtesy vision42design)

(Courtesy vision42design)

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City’s 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide.

Continue reading after the jump.

Thursday> The Architecture Lobby brings its manifesto to New York City

Architecture, Art, East
Thursday, July 17, 2014
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billevent

The Architecture Lobby is a new organization that advocates for the value of architecture in the general public but also to raise awareness inside the profession of working conditions for the majority of its practitioners. It also focuses on working conditions for young designers as they leave school and enter the profession—most with little awareness of the actual conditions of their labor and pay. The lobby has just staged two actions where it publicly read its manifesto of architectural labor-first at the Venice Architecture Biennale and recently at the AIA’s national convention in Chicago. In Chicago, the lobby was thrown off the convention floor by testy AIA officials who don’t want to think about the meaning of the Lobby’s protest.

More after the jump.

Le Corbusier’s Words Sought a New Architecture as Much as His Built Forms

International
Monday, July 7, 2014
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Andrea Pozzo, Rules and examples of perspective proper for painters and architects, etc.: in English and Latin. London, 1707. (Courtesy Vassar College Libraries)

Andrea Pozzo, Rules and examples of perspective proper for painters and architects, etc.: in English and Latin. London, 1707. (Courtesy Vassar College Libraries)

Writing mattered to the Swiss architect Le Corbusier. When he became a naturalized French citizen in 1930, Le Corbusier called himself neither a painter nor an architect, but an homme de lettres (a man of letters): he was an inveterate writer. His first book was a study of German decorative arts published when he was twenty-five; his last, sometimes described as a final testament, was completed only a month before his death. In between there are approximately fifty books (depending on how you define “book”), as well as letters, lectures, and handwritten journals as thick as books. Words were the stuff of architecture, not just how he participated in and influenced the debates of his time; they were essential to the task of making a new architecture.

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On View> The Louvre opens major restoration of its Decorative Arts Galleries

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

If you like French decorative arts you should make your way this summer to the Louvre’s newly restored and reinstalled 18th century Decorative Arts Galleries. The collection is housed in 35 galleries spanning 23,000 square feet. Over 2,000 design pieces “in object-focused galleries and period-room settings” are on display.

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Obit> Stanley Marsh, 1938–2014

Art, Obit, Southwest
Wednesday, June 18, 2014
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Texas' quirky Cadillac Ranch installation. (Doug Wighton / Flickr)

Texas’ quirky Cadillac Ranch installation. (Doug Wighton / Flickr)

Amarillo, Texas philanthropist Stanley Marsh—a major figure on creating two of the most iconic art works in America—considered himself an “artist and a prankster.” The patron of both Cadillac Ranch and Robert Smithson’s Amarillo Ramp (1973), the third in a trilogy a trilogy of spirals that also included Spiral Jetty (1970) and Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (1971), Marsh was an heir to his family’s oil-and-gas fortune.

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