New PBS Series To Showcase Ten Buildings That Changed America

National
Thursday, March 28, 2013
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Seagram Building, New York City, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1958.

Seagram Building, New York City, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1958. (Courtesy Wikimedia)

These days it seems increasingly rare that we take a moment out of our busy schedules to pause and appreciate our surroundings: downtown skyscrapers, grand civic buildings, or the mundane background buildings along our streets. To many, those soaring steel towers are old news, but have you ever stopped to picture a Manhattan without skyscrapers, or a courthouse in Washington, DC that didn’t resemble a Greek or Roman temple, or how about an America without shopping malls? (Unimaginable. Right?)

Dan Protress, writer and producer of the new PBS television series 10 Buildings that Changed America, certainly has. The series, hosted by Emmy-award winning producer Geoffrey Baer, proves that architecture is the cultural back-bone of any society.  The show was created to celebrate and explore ten of the most influential American buildings—and the architect’s that designed them—that dramatically altered the architectural landscape of this country.

Continue reading after the jump.

First Lexus Design Award Winners Reimagine Motion

"INAHO" lighting concept by Tangent (Hideki Yoshimoto and Yoshinaka Ono)

“INAHO” lighting concept by Tangent. (Hideki Yoshimoto and Yoshinaka Ono)

Have you ever found yourself thinking: “If only they had invented a/an—insert really clever device here—my life would be so much better?” For instance, a “clam kayak” that you could serenely float along in after a long week at work, or a “slide bridge” that offered the option to well, slide, rather then walk down a flight of stairs. It sounds too good to be true, but these inventive concepts were just two out of the twelve winning submissions of the first Lexus Design Award competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

That’s So 2007: Architecture Billings Index Continues to Show Healthy Increase

National
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
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BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

Over the past few months the Architecture Billings Index has shown the strongest growth in the demand for design services since 2007 and once again reports an incrementally strengthened score of 54.9 for February, a slight increase from a 54.2 in January (and a 51.2 in December). All four regions scored above 50, an indicator of positive growth. The Northeast performed the best at 56.7, the West and the Midwest tied at 54.7, and the South finished with a 52.7.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filament Mind LED Light Installation Shares Library Searches

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
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(David Agnello Photography, www.davidagnello.com / COURTESY E/B OFFICE)

(David Agnello Photography / Courtesy E/B OFFICE)

Before there was the Kindle and the Sony Reader, there were paperback novels, newspapers, magazines, made of tangible materials, like paper and ink. One could ride the subway and sneak a glimpse into the mind of his fellow passengers without ever exchanging a word; the title printed on the cover of the book you were reading might reveal volumes about your interests and curiosities. With the invasion of e-books and e-readers, there is just no way to tell what people are reading these days. Designers Brian W. Bush and Yong Ju Lee of E/B Office New York changed that with their Filament Mind installation that debuted in late January at the grand opening of the Teton County Library in Jackson, Wyoming.

Continue reading after the jump.

Winners of the 2013 eVolo Skyscraper Competition Announced

International
Thursday, March 14, 2013
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Polar Umbrella won first prize in the eVolo Skyscraper Competition. (Courtesy eVolo)

Polar Umbrella won first prize in the eVolo Skyscraper Competition. (Courtesy eVolo)

The winners of eVolo magazine’s 7th Skyscraper Competition have been announced!  This year the publication, which has hosted the prestigious competition since 2006, received 625 submissions from 83 different countries, but only 3 of the most thought-provoking projects were selected as the winners. From floating (on-water and in-midair) skyscrapers to morphing structures, each of these futuristic designs not only resembles something out of a sci-fi film, but more importantly, radically defies our understanding of vertical architecture, creatively explores new technologies, and proposes solutions for a more sustainable urban future.

See the winners after the jump.

Brazilian Architect Carla Juaçaba Wins First arcVision Prize For Women in Architecture

International
Thursday, March 14, 2013
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Pavilion Humanidade 2012. (Leonardo Finotti)

Pavilion Humanidade 2012. (Leonardo Finotti)

Thanks to the Italcementi Group, International Women’s Day just became that much more special. This year the group found a unique way to celebrate the holiday by instituting the very first competition its arcVision—Women in Architecture prize, an award that valorizes the increasingly important role women have and continue to play in architecture.

The jury selected 19 finalists from 15 different countries including but not limited to Egypt, Switzerland, Singapore, Italy, and Thailand. The architects were judged according to their creative approach in designing an unconventional structure as well as their ability to design a building that responds to the context of its site.

The prize was bestowed to Brazilian architect Carla Juaçaba at a press conference at the group’s i.lab Research Center (designed by Richard Meier) in Bergamo on March 7th, and was publicly announced the following day for International Women’s Day.

Continue reading after the jump.

Neutra’s Gettysburg Cyclorama Demolished

East
Friday, March 8, 2013
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Neutra's Gettysburg Cyclorama under demolition. (Britt Isenberg / Flickr)

Neutra’s Gettysburg Cyclorama under demolition. (Britt Isenberg / Flickr)

It has been clear since earlier this year that Richard Neutra’s Cyclorama Center in Gettysburg, PA was to meet the wrecking ball, but within the last week, bulldozers have officially destroyed the structure, according to Hanover Evening Sun, ending a more-than-three-year battle over what to do with the mid-century building.

Originally designed to house Paul Philippoteaux’s 377-foot painting of Pickett’s Charge, the rotunda is being torn down in order to restore the land on which it has resided since the 1960’s to it’s historic Civil War state. Bob Kirby, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park, expects demolition to be completed by late April but major efforts to restore the landmark site will not occur until after July 3rd, the date marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

More photos after the jump.

Winners of New York’s Telephone Booth Redesign Competition Announced

East
Thursday, March 7, 2013
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(Courtesy FXFOWLE)

The Loop telephone booth proposal by FXFOWLE. (Courtesy FXFOWLE)

The “payphone”—like subway tokens—is a word that has increasingly become synonymous with an older New York. It’s been years since many of us have even stepped into, let alone used, one of those bulky, eerily abandoned and, let’s face it, uninviting, telephone booths peppering New York City’s sidewalks. But unlike subway tokens, the payphone is making a comeback.

Continue reading after the jump.

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