Kimmelman Delivers at Barnard Tonight

East
Tuesday, March 6, 2012
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Gwendowlyn Wright and Michael Kimmelman at GSAPP's Wood Auditorium last night. (AN/Stoelker) Wright and Michael Kimmelman at GSAPP's Wood Auditorium last night. (AN/Stoelker)

Gwendolyn Wright and Michael Kimmelman at GSAPP's Wood Auditorium last night. (AN/Stoelker)

Forget for a moment that President Obama bumped the New York TimesJill Abramson from the dais to deliver this year’s commencement address at Barnard and not his alma mater, Columbia College. Tonight, the Times’ architecture critic Michael Kimmelman will be delivering a lecture at Barnard’s Diana Center, titled Public Space and Public Consciousness. However, a busy Kimmelman also appeared last night at GSAPP, for a conversation with Columbia Professor Gwendolyn Wright.

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Storefront Gets Real (estate) with NYC

East
Monday, March 5, 2012
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"New York City Bar Graph" by Lan Tuazon organizes scale models on shelves to differentiate function: banks, public housing, media, etc. (Courtesy Storefront).

"New York City Bar Graph" by Lan Tuazon organizes scale models on shelves to differentiate function: banks, public housing, media, etc. (Courtesy Storefront).

The Storefront for Art and Architecture launched Ingredients of Reality: Dismantling of New York City last Tuesday night.  The show features work by Lan Tuazon, whose bio reads that she was born in the Philippine Islands and “lives and works in New York whether she likes it or not.” It would seem from the show, that she likes it–but with reservations.  Through a series of seemingly disparate works, Tuazon calls attention to how real estate decisions have the ability to divide the New Yorkers economically and socially.

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Ornate Cornices Disappearing in Washington Heights

East
Wednesday, February 29, 2012
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The lion's heads that once graced the cornice of 4195 Broadway. (Courtesy Trish Mayo)

The lion's heads that once graced the cornice of 4195 Broadway, now in a dumpster. (Courtesy Trish Mayo)

When the attention of real estate speculators diverts, sometimes old neighborhoods have time to acquire a majestic patina. The Washington Heights section of northern Manhattan has been neglected for some time, but is now getting a fair share of spillover interest from Columbia’s Manhattanville project and the university’s nearby hospital campus. In 2009, the Audubon Park Historic District was created to protect the area just behind Audubon Terrace, home to the Hispanic Society and the Academy of Arts and Letters. But just north of the district, years of landlord neglect has unwittingly preserved row after row of early 20th century apartment buildings festooned with ornate cornices. But the cornices are now in danger of disappearing.

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Cornell Chooses Six Finalists for Tech Campus.  The initial SOM proposal for Cornell's tech campus. (Courtesy SOM)The initial SOM proposal for Cornell's tech campus. (Courtesy SOM) And then there were six. Cornell University announced that six firms were selected from a field of 43 contenders to design their new tech campus on Roosevelt Island. SOM, the firm that pushed Cornell over the top in the national competition to build on Roosevelt is still in the running, alongside OMA (Office for Metropolitan Architecture)
, Diller Scofidio + Renfro
, Morphosis Architects
, Steven Holl Architects
, and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. SOM will remain on the job to define an overall campus plan. The university is still running with its net-zero plan for the first core building. Residences and other multi-use buildings will follow. A contract with the winning firm is set to be signed in April.

 

Selling Via Verde

East
Monday, February 27, 2012
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About 40 co-op units are still available at Via Verde. (Courtesy Phipps Rose Dattner Grimshaw)

About 40 co-op units are still available at Via Verde. (Courtesy Phipps Rose Dattner Grimshaw)

Who wouldn’t want buy into an eco-conscious, sustainable, and affordable apartment building whose Grimshaw/Dattner-designed architecture received rave reviews on the front page of the New York Times? With more than 40 of the 75 co-ops still available at Via Verde, the gang at developer Jonathan Rose Co. and Dattner are giving the project the full media push. Jonathan Rose’s Ari Goldstein and Dattner’s Bill Stein were on New York 1 this morning promoting the design and high living standards. The 151 rental units of this muli-income complex were snapped up right away. But while the co-ops sales aren’t exactly flagging, they’re not exactly flying off the shelves in this economy.

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CB2 Votes Unanimous Nay on NYU Expansion

East
Friday, February 24, 2012
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Arial view of NYU's expansion plans.

Arial view of NYU's expansion plans.

Manhattan Community Board 2 unanimously voted against the NYU expansion plan in Greenwich Village last night citing the impact its scale would have on the neighborhood. Grimshaw with Toshiko Mori designed four of the proposed towers and Michael Van Valkenburgh designed the landscape for the 2.4 million square foot expansion. The plans were set within two superblocks that sprang from Robert Moses-era urban renewal projects that featured buildings by I.M. Pei, Paul Lester Weiner, and a garden by Hideo Sasaki.
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Foreclosed Forum: Suburbs, Cities, and Crisis

East, Newsletter
Thursday, February 23, 2012
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The What is Forclosed Forum was held last Saturday at Columbia's Low Library.

The "What is Foreclosed?" Forum was held last Saturday at Columbia's Low Library.

It might have been the first time that the works of Jay-Z, Malice, and Nas were evoked under the great dome of Columbia’s Low Library, but given the trend among young academics to cite rap alongside Socrates, it’s probably won’t be the last. That the quotes were used in the panel discussion called “Suburbs, Cities and Crisis,” spoke to a slightly skewed perspective of discussing the suburbs within the confines of Manhattan.

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Zahner, Zaha’s Schumacher, CASE, and More: Facades Conference 2012

East, Fabrikator
Thursday, February 16, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:
Facade fabricated by A. Zahner specializes in the void.

A facade fabricated by A. Zahner specializes in the void. (Courtesy A. Zahner)

Architects and fabricators discuss creating facades in the digital age

Yesterday The Architect’s Newspaper and the Ornamental Metal Institute of New York presented their first-ever educational conference at McGraw-Hill Auditorium in New York. More than 250 professionals and students attended the event, themed Metals in Construction, which addressed facade design in an age when skilled collaboration between architects, consultants, and fabricators can more than ever affect a building’s performance and longevity. The day began with a presentation by Bill Zahner, who spoke of his company’s forward-looking work with metal facades, then moved into discussions covering everything from new retrofit strategies to the latest projects from Zaha Hadid Architects with the firm’s director, Patrik Schumacher.

The day also included the official announcement of a new international alliance of academics, professional designers, hardware and software developers and digital fabricators. Born out of a regional organization known as Tex-Fab, the group will be called Digital Fabrication Alliance and offered a look at the kind of minds it will be bringing together at future events with a panel discussion with Phillip Anzalone, Anna Dyson, and Erik Verboon. Read on for AN‘s coverage of the day’s events:

Continue reading after the jump.

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Rescuing Johansen’s Mummers Theater

Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, February 15, 2012
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The Stage Center, formerly the Mummer Theater, in Oklahoma City (Courtesy smallarchitects.com)

The Stage Center, formerly the Mummer Theater, in Oklahoma City (Courtesy smallarchitects.com)

Amidst office towers in the heart of Oklahoma City sits an incongruous ensemble of multicolored boxes, tubes, concrete skywalks, and corrugated metal painted in shades of red, blue, orange, and chartreuse green. One cantilevered rectangle precariously perches at the edge of a swooping concrete form whose interior holds a theater in the round, once home to the Mummers Theater troupe. Architect John M. Johansen, of the so-called “Harvard Five,” completed the project for the Mummers in 1970, but the troupe folded just one year later. The building would go through several incarnations as a theater/arts center called Stage Center until a 2010 flood put it out of commission. Vandalism and decay ensued, and now the AIA Central Oklahoma chapter has put out an RFP for the renovation, hoping to spur design-world interest in their Save Stage Center Campaign.

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Runners vs. Bikers at VanCortlandt’s Putnam Trail

East
Tuesday, February 14, 2012
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Parks plans on paving and widening the Putnam Trail in Van Cortlandt Park. (Courtesy Save the Putnam Trail)

Parks plans on paving and widening the Putnam Trail in Van Cortlandt Park. (Courtesy Save the Putnam Trail)

The hullabaloo over Brooklyn bike lanes at Prospect Park subsided continues as strong as ever, but a new bike controversy has been brewing up in the Bronx over the past few months. The drama centers on Parks Department plans to pave over Van Cortlandt Park‘s Putnam Trail, a path that was originally cleared for a rail line more than a century ago. The new plan was spurred by the “Rails to Trails” movement. The path, much beloved by the runners, has spurred some mudslinging by the pro-dirt contingent against “an elite, mostly out-of-borough handful,” as trail lover Michael Burke put it in an Op-ed piece for The Riverdale Press back in December.

The runners have been fighting back by gathering over a thousand letters and nearly 600 signatures through their Save the Putnam Trail Facebook page. The group argues that a stone dust surface would be far more eco-friendly than the proposed asphalt and would cut the projected $2.4 million budget for the project in half. The group says its not anti-bike, just anti-asphalt and a stone dust path would suit wheels just fine. For their part, Parks said that the their plan would open the trail to all users by providing a dirt path for runners, creating a lane for bikers and making the path ADA accessible. The new trail would be a contiguous path connecting to a paved path in Westchester County and the citywide greenways. Van Cortlandt park administrator Margot Perron said in a statement that stone dust is much more difficult for wheelchairs, strollers and bicycles to navigate than a hard surface and requires much more maintenance.

UPDATE 2/15:  On the Save the Putnam Trail site yesterday, Meg Riordan reports that she spotted machinery preparing the trail for the paving. “From an ecological view, I am also confounded as to ‘how’ adding more impervious surfaces – to replace dirt – benefits the natural wooded habitat,” she writes. A spokesperson from Parks pointed out that new drainage will carry runoff. Also, four hundred saplings and 42 young trees will be added and invasive species will be cleared away. The project will last one year.

 

Aliotta Takes Helm at AIANY

Other
Monday, February 13, 2012
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New AIANY Chapter president Joseph Aliotta in front of Center's new storefront.

New AIANY Chapter president Joseph Aliotta in front of Center's new storefront.

Joseph Aliotta, a principal at Swanke Hayden Connell, took over the chapter presidency of the AIANY last month, ushering in the Center for Architecture’s 2012 theme: “Future Now.” Aliotta plans a two-prong approach that will focus on the future of the profession and of the future of the built environment.

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Obit> Norma Merrick Sklarek, 1926-2012

West
Friday, February 10, 2012
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Norma Merrick Sklarek.

Norma Merrick Sklarek.

Norma Merrick Sklarek, the first African American woman to become a licensed architect in the country, died on Monday in Los Angeles, The Los Angeles Times reports.  Sklarek, a native of Harlem, went to Barnard College  before graduating from Columbia’s architecture school in 1950. She passed the New York State exam in 1954, becoming the first African American woman to receive her professional architecture license and earning her the nickname “the Rosa Parks of Architecture.” She later moved to California where she was turned down for work 19 times before going on to work for SOM, Gruen Associates, Welton Becket, and the Jerde Partnership.

Continue reading after the jump.

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