Video> DDG’s Bluestone Clad 41 Bond

East
Wednesday, November 30, 2011
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Masons carved 41 Bond's bluestone in the backyard; nothing was prefabbed.

Masons carved 41 Bond's bluestone in the backyard; nothing was prefabbed.

DDG Partner’s latest project uses a material often found under foot and gives it a hard-earned respect long deserved. New York State bluestone clads the entirety of 41 Bond’s facade, a condo with four full floor units, a ground floor townhouse, a duplex, and a penthouse duplex. Over the past few months usual Bond Street soundscape of tires rumbling over cobblestone has been interrupted by the clangs of the quarry, as masons fit the stone into place. All of the stone carving was done on site. DDG’s CEO Joseph McMillan, Jr. and chief creative officer Peter Guthrie give AN a tour…

Watch the video after the jump

Architect: The Louis Kahn Opera

East
Tuesday, November 22, 2011
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One of the few images that evoke Kahn.

One of the watercolors by Michiko Theurer evoking Kahn.

The Center for Architecture is known for programming variety, but last Thursday night’s premier of Architect: a chamber opera was a first. Granted, the film premier benefiting the CFA Foundation wasn’t live opera, but it was the first time the public got to hear the piece by Lewis Spratlan.  The Pulitzer Prize winning composer’s music was paired with electroacoustical music by John Downey and Jenny Kallick, whose process involved “sound sampling” spaces designed by Kahn, such as the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California.  Spratlan’s music was then electronically “placed” within the various spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

Occupied Murray Street

Other
Thursday, November 17, 2011
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Accross the street from AN's offices, the police were preparing for something. (AN/Stoelker)

Across the street from AN's offices, the police were preparing for something. Note the nonplussed New Yorker walking her dog. (AN/Stoelker)

Running to grab a bite outside of the AN office just hasn’t been the same over the past few days. With the Occupy Wall Street drama continuing to play out, we now dodge hundreds of protesters, tourists, police, and the media (oh wait, that’s us) on our way to the corner coffee shop. But today’s just a bit different, with nearly a hundred officers lined up outside the office receiving plastic handcuff strips. “We don’t know why we’re here yet,” one officer told our editor Julie Iovine. “Hopefully it’ll rain, the temperature will drop, and they’ll all go home.”

More photos after the jump

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Port Authority Tower Felled at Last

Other
Thursday, November 17, 2011
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SOHO China's CEO Zhang Xin at Davos this past January. (Courtesy World Economic Forum).

SOHO China's CEO Zhang Xin at Davos this past January. (Courtesy World Economic Forum)

After the New York Times’s Charles Bagli broke the story on Tuesday that Vornado was no longer moving forward with plans to build the Richard Rogers-designed tower atop the Port Authority Bus Terminal, reporters descended on the Port’s board meeting on Wednesday. A transcript of the Q&A provided by the Port Authority reveals that while Vornado may be out of the picture, the Port hasn’t entirely dropped tower development from its list of possibilities, it’s just been put onto their gargantuan real-estate to-do list. Newly installed Patrick J. Foye hinted that the board was none-too-pleased with the snail like pace of development—it had been in the works for a decade. The deal fell through when Vornado’s Chinese backers pulled out casting an eye beyond the West Side to the East, Park Avenue that is.

Continue reading after the jump.

Live Blogging> Zoning the City Conference

East
Tuesday, November 15, 2011
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Lower Manhattan in 1961, the year of the city's landmark zoning resolution (Courtesy City Planning)

Lower Manhattan in 1961, the year of the city's landmark zoning resolution. (Courtesy City Planning)

[ The AN editorial team is on hand for  Zoning the City conference, now in progress at the McGraw-Hill Conference Center in Manhattan. We'll be live blogging and tweeting @archpaper with hashtag #zoningthecity throughout the day, so check back and follow us on twitter for updates! ]

6:00 p.m.

In a wrap-up conversation moderated by Kayden, a panel brought together Thom Mayne, A.M. Stern, and Mary Ann Tighe to investigate a few non-planning factors, though of course it rounded back to planning within moments. The exchange was peppered with A.M. Stern wit, Mayne theory, and Tighe pragmatism.

Remarking on the more than 4 billion square feet of undeveloped FAR in New York City, Stern remarked, “That’s a lot of development–even for Related!”

Tighe said that zoning remained necessary, at the very least, for developers’ peace of mind. “I think we need some boundaries,” she said. “Things that will allow capital an amount of comfort that it’ll need to move foreword.” Tighe, who heads up New York’s real estate board, provide an audience full of zoning wonks and architects an investors voice, “What we keep forgetting after the vision is that the money has to come, the as-of-right things are needed.”

Stern replied no spoon full of sugar was needed to let this medicine go down. “Architects complain, they always complain,” he said “But they do their best work with difficult clients, financial constraints.”

Mayne broke through the realm of brick and mortar. “New York is inseparable from its intellectual capital, that’s it’s certainty and predictability.”

4:45 p.m.

Matthew Carmona of University College London played to a re-caffeinated crowd, using humor to diffuse  a very complex approval process for zoning London’s 32 different boroughs. With each borough weighing in with their own distinct processes and opinions, plus the mayor putting his two pence in, and even the secretary of state having a say, its amazing London plans as well as it does. The process looks more nightmarish than a West Village community board debating a university expansion. One intriguing aspect was the specificity of the Views Management Framework, which include river views, linear views, townscape views, and panoramas. But it was left to Loeb Fellow Peter Park, paraphrasing Goldberger, to best describe London’s beautiful mess. “Some of the greatest places in the world were built before zoning,” he said. “There’s an element of serendipity.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Taking Stock of POPS

East
Monday, November 14, 2011
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Zuccatti is one of 391 privately owned public spaces. (AN/Stoelker)

Zuccotti is one of 391 privately owned public spaces in NYC. (AN/Stoelker)

Last week, The New York World, a website produced by Columbia’s Journalism School, along with WNYC’s Brian Lehrer Show completed a crowd-sourced survey of New York City’s privately owned public spaces (POPS). The World consulted Jerold Kayden’s 2000 tome, Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, as a guide to gauge whether the private entities were keeping the public parks truly public and user-friendly. Kayden, who is co-chairing tomorrow’s Zoning the City conference with Commissioner Amanda Burden, has been the go-to expert on subject since Occupy Wall Streeters took over the world’s most famous POPS, Zuccotti Park.  All told, nearly 150 sites out of 391 around New York City were visited and commented on for the survey.

Read More

Slideshow> Brooklyn Navy Yard Opening

East
Thursday, November 10, 2011
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Beyer Blinder Bell and workshop/adp meets Thomas U. Walter. (AN/Stoelker)

Beyer Blinder Bell and workshop/adp meet Thomas U. Walter. (AN/Stoelker)

There was plenty of pomp for the opening of the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s BLDG 92. For the first time in 210 years, the Yard welcomed the public into its gates. The $25.6 million project includes the renovation of a building by U.S. Capitol architect Thomas U. Walter and the addition of new 24,000-square-foot community and exhibition space. D.I.R.T. Studio signed on as landscape architect. Beyer Blinder Belle and workshop/adp dreamed up a perforated sunscreen which utilizes highly pixelated imagery of an historic photograph, meshing new technology with nostalgic imagery.

For a peek of old meeting new, check out the slideshow after the jump.

Stern’s Revolution Museum Silences QEII Bell

East
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
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Queen Elizabeth outside at the dedication of the Bicentennial Bell in 1976.

Queen Elizabeth II at the dedication of the Bicentennial Bell in 1976. (Courtesy phillyhistory.org)

After rejecting two plans for the Museum of the American Revolution at Valley Forge, the American Revolution Center (ARC) made a land swap with the National Park Service to secure a prime location in Center City Philadelphia. In exchange for donating their 78-acre property at the Valley Forge site, the Park Service will give the museum nearly two-thirds of the space of the former National Park Visitors Center near Independence Mall on Third Street. ARC selected Robert A.M. Stern to design the $150 million building. Stern told ThePhiladelphia Inquirer he plans to use “the language of traditional Philadelphia architecture.” The 1970s era building designed by Cambridge Seven and its redbrick modernist bell tower holding the Bicentennial Bell, a gift to United States from Queen Elizabeth II, will be demolished, and critics worry the future of the bell itself is uncertain.

Read More

Event> Zoning the City

East
Friday, November 4, 2011
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Lower Manhattan, 1961

Lower Manhattan, 1961

Attention Zoning Wonks! In honor of the 50th anniversary of the 1961 Zoning Resolution, City Planning is hosting the Zoning the City Conference on November 15.  Mayor Bloomberg will open the conference, while planning commissioner Amanda Burden will moderate with Harvard planning guru Jerold Kayden (a recent AN commentator). AN plans to blog live from the event and City Planning will be tweeting away @ZoningTheCity. The event, co-sponsored with Harvard and Baruch’s Newman Institute, has already been dubbed “the Woodstock of Planning” by one at least one registrant.

Read More

Video> Toshiko Mori on Poe Park

East, Newsletter
Thursday, November 3, 2011
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Poe House before restoration. (AN/Stoelker)

Poe Cottage before restoration. (AN/Stoelker)

On October 25 the New York Times reported on vandalism and closed bathrooms at the Toshiko Mori-designed Poe Park’s Visitor Center, but today a Parks Department spokesperson told AN that bathrooms were reopened and that the vandalism has been addressed. The late October report marred what had otherwise been a stellar week for the neighborhoods along the Grand Concourse nearby. Earlier in the week, a good chunk of the boulevard was landmarked and over the weekend, the Bronx Museum hosted Beyond the Super Square, a conference on mid-century Latin American and Caribbean architecture. However, the Poe Park Visitor Center itself still sits on shuttered while Parks and the Bronx County Historical society wrestle with how to staff the place. For now, a Parks’ video tour starring Toshiko Mori will have to suffice…

Watch the video after the jump…

Lantern Lights Out at Jane’s Carousel

East
Monday, October 31, 2011
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The view from Bubby's Brooklyn provided the perfect sunset vista of the carousel.

The view from Bubby's Brooklyn provided the perfect sunset vista of the carousel.

Over the weekend, we headed out to Brooklyn Bridge Park to check out the light show of Jane’s Carousel. We had been told that silhouettes of horses were to be projected onto a ceiling scrim until 1AM. We even held ambitions of traipsing across the Brooklyn Bridge to get a better view. But after watching a spectacular sunset reflect off of Jean Nouvel’s acrylic cube, the show was over. We were told that the lights for the magic lantern were much too hot for the recently restored horses. No matter, it’s hard to surpass the carousel’s bulbs reflected in the acrylic, with a glittering Manhattan serving as backdrop.

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Grand Concourse Discourse: Rosenblum on a New Landmark

East
Friday, October 28, 2011
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The Bronx County Courthouse falls within the new district. (Lehman College Art Gallery/Stoelker)

The Bronx County Courthouse sits within the new district. (Lehman College Art Gallery/Stoelker)

Shortly after the Landmarks Preservation Commission declared a section of the Grand Concourse an historic district on Tuesday, New York Times columnist Constance Rosenblum  received a call with the news. Walking down Montague Street near her home in Brooklyn Heights, the usually unflappable writer burst into tears. When it comes to the Concourse, Rosenblum wrote the book. Her 2010 chronicle of the corridor, Boulevard of Dreams (NYU Press, $20), played a significant role in calling attention to the plight and promise of the neighborhood. “It was notable day,” she said in a phone interview in reference to the announcement. “It wasn’t easy for the Bronx, and the stigmas will remain for a long time.”

Read More

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