Quick Clicks> Digital Clay, Red Blue Greenhouse, Platonic Rugs, Biker Rights

Daily Clicks
Monday, August 22, 2011
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Recompose, the "digital clay" 3D interface developed by MIT Media Lab. Courtesy TechNewsDaily.

Digital Clay. Last week at the SIGGRAPH technology conference, a prototype input device called “Recompose” made its debut. TechNewsDaily says that this “marriage of a keyboard and a 3-D tiled surface could be the future of computer interfaces.” Developed by the MIT Media Lab, Recompose will give users the ability to “sculpt” data.

LED Lettuce. The Dutch have amped up hydroponic agriculture with the use of LEDs, notes Good magazine. Scientists in the Netherlands have found that using the red and blue versions of the lights maximizes the effects of sunlight and minimizes dehydration. A bonus result? Greenhouses with rave-like ambiance.

Flat out Platonic.  Core 77 alerted us to the thought-provoking carpet designs of Luís Porém, which are based on deconstructed Plato’s beloved polyhedrons.

Biker Rights. A group of NYC lawyers ride to the aid of cyclists disputing NYPD tickets for bell, helmet, and lane violations, reports The New York Times. The law firm of Rankin & Taylor is preparing a class action suit against the city on behalf of bikers.

Slideshow> Foster & Apple Render the Cupertino Ring

West
Friday, August 19, 2011
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Apple's planned Cupertino campus. (Courtesy Foster & Partners)

Apple's planned Cupertino campus. (Courtesy Foster & Partners)

The official Foster + Partners design has (finally) been released for the new Apple campus in Cupertino. At a recent Cupertino City Council meeting Steve Jobs said he was excited to centralize his campus with a building for 12,000 employees on a site currently dominated by parking lots. In the time since the Cupertino meeting, the not-so-secret news that Foster & Partners designed the giant ring has also been confirmed. The low-lying complex, described as being built at a “human scale” and largely off the grid, is expected to open in 2015. In reference to the overall design and the building’s glass curvature Jobs noted, “It’s a little like a spaceship landed.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Tabled, Athletic Alphabet, Grand Apple, and Trumping Georgia

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, August 17, 2011
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Table of Tables. It’s a meta periodic table of tables…or a chemistry lessons for design connoisseurs. Curbed posted the tongue-in-cheek infographic above: gone are helium, hydrogen, and silver; now we have coffee tables, pool tables, and nightstands.

Athletic Alphabet. An ambitious Spanish graphic designer, Joan Pons Moll, has created a new typeface—with his feet. Living on the island of Menorca, with its curving, windy streets, Moll uses Run Keeper, to map his letter-shaped routes. More at the NY Times.

Grand Apple. Apple’s next stop is Grand Central. Slated to open in the balcony space once home to restaurant Metrazur, Apple will forgoe its traditional glass cube designs in favor of an open plan overlooking the main concourse. New renderings posted by Gothamist show a minimal layout filled with high-tech toys.

Trumping Georgia.Donald Trump will develop the two tallest towers in Georgia (the country, not the state), according to the NY Times. The Don’s firm won’t be directly involved with construction; instead, Silk Road Group will manage the projects. John Fotiadas Architect is designing the master plan for the residential tower slated for the Georgian city of Batumi.

Quick Clicks> Forgiveness, Hiroshima, Farmers Markets, & Missing Maps

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, August 16, 2011
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Pop-up confessionals in Madrid. (Marta Ramoneda/NYTimes)

Pop-up confessionals in Madrid. (Marta Ramoneda/NYTimes)

Pop-Up Forgiveness. With Spain in the midst of an austerity plan, the NY Times reported that Madrid and the Catholic Church have spent $72 million for festivities centered around the visit of Pope Benedict XVI, which has drawn criticism from many in the city. Among the improvements lavished upon Madrid are 200 pop-up confessional booths in Retiro Park. Perhaps city leaders doling out funds will be among those in line at the booths.

Reminder! Tomorrow, Wednesday August 17th, the International Center of Photography will hold a panel discussion in conjunction with the exhibition Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945. The discussion will feature authors Erin Barnett, Adam Harrison Levy, and Greg Mitchell who will speak about the exhibition’s compelling photographs of post-bomb Hiroshima along with a discussion of censorship and documentation of the the attack.

A farmers market in Jackson, Mississippi. (Natalie Maynor / Flickr)

A farmers market in Jackson, Mississippi. (Natalie Maynor/Flickr)

Fresh Jobs. Data from a USDA report released last week indicated that farmers markets are on the rise in the United States. The report counted 7,175 markets, a 17 percent increase since last year. States with the largest growth were Colorado, Alaska, and Texas, representing a robust local and regional food system. Grist and GOOD broke down the report.

Where’s the Map? Transportation Nation asks, Where’s the Amtrak map at Penn Station? It seems as though travelers are missing out on the opportunity to visually place their train journeys. As journalist Mark Ovenden said,“maps are part of the journey, and we shouldn’t forget that.” You can ask for a paper fold-out version, which pales in comparison as its streaking red lines give little real indication of the train’s path.

On View> Seat: An Outdoor Chair Show in San Francisco

West
Tuesday, August 9, 2011
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(Courtesy Respective Designers)
(Courtesy Respective Designers)

Seat: An Outdoor Chair Show
Fort Mason Center
38 Fort Mason
San Francisco
Through May 31, 2012

In collaboration with the Fort Mason Center, curators Topher Delaney and Kika Probst of Seam Studio challenged forty designers to create and build outdoor public seating that would reflect the waterfront site and be able to withstand year-round weather conditions in Northern California.

The seats are displayed throughout selected areas of the thirteen-acre campus that is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Center. Each designer loaned their seat for free, and many firms created new partnerships for the project, such as Arup with Jefferson Mack Metal. The West End Terminal Seat, after the jump, designed by Nilus Designs: Architecture was inspired by the natural ecology at Fort Mason, particularly the salty water and wind patterns. Comprised of 208 vertical polycarbonate sections, the porous surfaces of the seat collect site debris and salt, while hollow flutes capture the sounds of the wind currents. The seat is also wired with user-activated LED lights and QR codes that visitors can scan for further information about the exhibit.

More photos after the jump.

Filed Under: 

On View> Talk to Me at MoMA

East
Monday, August 8, 2011
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Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Talk to Me
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through November 7

Talk to Me explores the subject of communication between people and their environment, highlighting the role of the designer in imagining and establishing these connections. Through a diverse selection of objects and conceptual work, the exhibition examines designs that engage users, including information systems, visualization design, communication devices, and interfaces, like the QR code mowed into a field in Bernhard Hopfengärtner’s project Hello World!, above.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Obit> Lauretta Vinciarelli, 1943-2011

East
Friday, August 5, 2011
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Lauretta Vinciarelli, Night #6, 1996; architectural drawing; watercolor and ink on paper. (Courtesy SFMOMA)

Lauretta Vinciarelli, an artist, architect, and professor, whose water color paintings were deeply rooted in architecture, died Thursday in New York City. In the forward to her book Not Architecture: But Evidence That It Exists Brooke Hodge wrote of how “Vinciarelli’s work shows, indeed, how inextricably bound together art and architecture are for her and should be for more of us.” Her art crossed borders architectural form and space with an interest in light. “The paintings are of spaces I know that look nothing like what I paint,” Vinciarelli told Hodge.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: 

Piano Forte: Inaugural Renzo Piano Award Honors Young Italian Architects

International
Thursday, July 28, 2011
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Renzo Piano with Paolo Iotti and Marco Pavarani. (Courtesy Iotti+Pavarani)

Renzo Piano with Paolo Iotti and Marco Pavarani. (Courtesy Iotti+Pavarani)

Frank Gehry is looking to sell his archive, Richard Meier opens his Queens storage room for models to visitors by appointment, and now Renzo Piano is giving back, too. On June 10, his eponymous foundation launched a new awards competition to encourage young Italian architects, a rare breed these days.

To that end, the competition was open to designers under 40 with an office in Italy presenting a constructed work. The jury, composed mostly of architectural magazine editors, whittled 69 entries down to three winners who demonstrated “innovative and poetic space research.” The purse for the prize was 10,000 euros each.

The top honor, handed out in June, went to Iotti+Pavarani architects based in northern Italy. Piano was particularly impressed with their recently completed Domus Technica building, a training and innovation center for a manufacturing company in Brescello, Italy. Honorable mentions were bestowed upon ARCó and carlorattiassociati.

View work by the winning firms after the jump.

On View> Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods & Christoph A. Kumpusch

Newsletter, West
Thursday, July 28, 2011
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Rendering of Woods & Kumpusch's Light Pavilion. (Courtesy MAK)

Rendering of Woods & Kumpusch's Light Pavilion. (Courtesy MAK)

Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods and
Christoph A. Kumpusch: Construction
Drawings & In-Process Photographs at the
Mackey Garage Top
MAK Center at the Schindler House
835 North Kings Road
West Hollywood
Through August 6

The Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods and Christoph A. Kumpusch was created for Steven Holl’s Sliced Porosity Block project now under construction in Chengdu, China, and will be Lebbeus Woods’ first built work of architecture. A physical intervention into Holl’s rectilinear structure, the pavilion consists of a series of columns and stairs that are illuminated from with and change color, and the luminous effect will be amplified by the pavilion’s mirrored interior walls. The MAK exhibition includes construction drawings and process photographs of the installation, as well as conceptual renderings of this project, above, and other work of Woods and Kumpusch.

See more after the jump.

ON VIEW> Lists: To Dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts

East
Monday, July 25, 2011
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Oscar Bluemner, List of works of art, 18 May 1932. Courtesy Morgan Library.

Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists’ Enumerations from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art
The Morgan Library
225 Madison Ave.
Through October 2

In partnership with the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, the Morgan Library presents a collection of lists. Works include drawings by 80 creative list-makers, including Alexander Calder, Pablo Picasso, and Elaine de Kooning. These to-dos, illustrated inventories, and collected thoughts reveal a certain intimacy, inviting viewers to find interest in selected biographical moments. Each list exposes process by creating a memory archive of sorting, narrowing, and sifting thoughts. Oscar Bluemner’s list of works of art, May 18, 1932, pictured above, is an illustrated inventory of the artist’s recent landscape paintings.

Check out a gallery from the exhibition after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Brodsky’s Vienna, Seating San Fran, Wind in the West, & Explorers Underground

Daily Clicks
Friday, July 22, 2011
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Alexander Brodsky at Az W (Courtesy Yuri Palmin)

Alexander Brodsky at Az W (Courtesy Yuri Palmin)

Day becomes night. Alexander Brodsky: It still amazes me that I became an architect will be open at the Architekturzentrum Wien in Vienna, Austria through October 3. Described by the gallery as a “total installation,” Archidose also notes that during the exhibition “the day becomes night, the dimensions of space and time appear to slowly dissolve as one paces an archaeological chamber of wonders. Having returned to daylight, a selection of Brodsky’s completed projects provides insights into his architectural oeuvre.” (More images after the jump.)

Steel becomes ribbon. Streetsblog reports that San Francisco metaphorically cut the ribbon, unveiling a new public space on the two-block Powell Street Promenade.  The Union Square shopping district is greatly improved by the eight six-foot wide Walter Hood-designed benches, constructed to resemble delicate ribbons.

Above the fray. The Westerholt E-66 Observation Wind Turbine stands out among the 40 turbines in the Holtriem Wind Park: it’s unique observation deck provides visitors with panoramic views of one Europe’s largest wind farms—for a price. Visitors must climb a 297-step spiral staircase to reach the viewing deck, according to Atlas Obscura.

Under the city. Produced by Silent UK, the documentary film Beneath the Surface trails urban explorers as they descend below the cities of London and Paris, says PSFK. The explorers climb through sewers, old subway lines, reminiscent of the NY Times five-day adventure last December under New York.

Check out a few more Brodsky images after the jump.

Going Green in Ghana: Mario Cucinella’s One Airport Square

International
Friday, July 22, 2011
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One Airport Square in Accra, Ghana. (Courtesy Mario Cucinella Architects)

One Airport Square in Accra, Ghana. (Courtesy Mario Cucinella Architects)

Of Sand and Stone. On September 8th, Milan-based architect Mario Cucinella will break ground on his One Airport Square project in Accra, Ghana’s capital city. The 230,000 square foot structure of irregular cantilevered floor plates embraced by a web of diagonal concrete supports meant to evoke traditional African patterns. Plans call for a dynamic pedestrian plaza with shops and cafes topped with commercial space. Solar panels are integrated among cantilevered terraces with indigenous fauna to protect the building from the scorching sun.

Check out a video and gallery after the jump.

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