Chicago’s Divvy bike share program gets a corporate sponsor

Pro tip: A bike with the seat backwards means it's in need of repair. (John Sonderman / Flickr)

Pro tip: A bike with the seat backwards means it’s in need of repair. (John Sonderman / Flickr)

Divvy, Chicago’s bike share program, just sold the moving ad space of some 3,000 bicycles that have traveled 2.5 million miles since the system launched nine months ago. Illinois’ largest health insurance company, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, paid $12.5 million to sponsor Divvy and brand its blue bikes and vans with their corporate logo beginning in June. The Chicago Tribune reported that the highest bidder was Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, which has also sponsored several other bikeshare systems in recent years, starting in Minneapolis. The health insurance company will pay $2.5 million each year through 2018—revenue the city will use to expand Divvy and fund bicycling projects throughout the city.

Eavesdrop> Block Party: Chicago Design Museum Finds New Home in Downtown Chicago Mall

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Monday, June 2, 2014
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block-thirty-seven-chicago

Just last month Eaves dropped in on the Chicago Design Museum for the launch of its Kickstarter campaign, which sought funding for the institution’s first summer exhibition in a new permanent space. Well, that space has been revealed, and it’s every Chicagoan’s favorite downtown boondoggle. No, not the Spire. Or the Post Office. Never mind—it’s Block Thirty Seven! That’s right, it turns out the largely vacant downtown mall has 5,000 square feet free for ChiDM (and probably a lot more). A good chance to remind yourself that the building’s still there, looming above the Red Line-Blue Line transfer.

On View> Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile

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Della Robbia Room Bar, Vanderbilt Hotel, 1912

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile
Museum of the City of New York
1220 5th Avenue, New York
Through September 7th

Coming to New York City from Washington, D.C., this exhibition illuminates the legacy of architect and builder Rafael Guastavino. A Catalan immigrant, Guastavino created the iconic (and aptly named) Guastavino tile. By interlocking terracotta tiles and layers of mortar to build his arches, Guastavino married old-world aesthetics with modern innovation. The resulting intersection of technology and design revolutionized New York City’s landscape, and is used in over 200 historic buildings including Grand Central Terminal, Carnegie Hall, The Bronx Zoo’s Elephant House, and Ellis Island.

View a slideshow of Guastavino vaults after the jump.

Permanent Vacation, Anyone? Illinois & Connecticut Residents Would Prefer a Move

Eavesdroplet, Midwest, National
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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gallup-moving-poll

Gallup pollsters recently asked Americans if they had the opportunity to move, “would you like to move to another state, or would you rather remain in your current state?” Well, Illinois and Connecticut earned the dubious distinction of having the nation’s most restless residents. About half of the surveyed residents in Illinois wanted to bounce, but don’t expect an influx of moving boxes. We’ll probably just ride it out and complain. Case in point: another Gallup poll found 25 percent of Illinoisans surveyed said their state is “the worst possible place to live in”—second only in self-loathing to Rhode Island.

Eavesdrop> The Long Game Well-Played: SHoP Hires an Editorial Director

East, Eavesdroplet, Media, Shft+Alt+Del
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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Philip Nobel.

Philip Nobel.

Architecture critic and one-time eavesdropper Philip Nobel has a fancy new title: Editorial Director for SHoP Architects. Though he has long been known for throwing critical barbs, Nobel has always been cozy with the firm, having contributed an introduction to their monograph, Out of Practice, and a written glowing profile of Vishaan Chakrabarti for Metropolis (the piece had the oh-so subtle title, “Vishaansanity”). You might say it was a very long audition that clearly paid off in the end.

On View> “Soto: The Houston Penetrable” Suspends 24,000 Tubes in Kinetic Display

Art, Interiors, On View, Southwest
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Houston)

(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Houston)

Soto: The Houston Penetrable
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
1001 Bissonnet
Through September 1, 2014

The final installation in Jesús Rafael Soto’s Penetrables series—Houston Penetrable—will be on view at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, as of May 8. An interactive display of 24,000 PVC tubes, each hand painted and tied, will hang from the second story of the museum’s Cullinan Hall.

More after the jump.

On View> Chicago’s Graham Foundation Presents “Everything Loose Will Land”

Midwest, On View
Thursday, May 22, 2014
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L.A. Fine Arts Squad (Victor Henderson, Terry Schoonhoven), "Isle of California," 1971. (Joshua White)

L.A. Fine Arts Squad (Victor Henderson, Terry Schoonhoven), “Isle of California,” 1971. (Joshua White)

Everything Loose Will Land
Graham Foundation
4 West Burton Place, Chicago
Through July 26

Everything Loose Will Land explores the intersection of art and architecture in Los Angeles during the 1970s. The show’s title refers to a Frank Lloyd Wright quote that if you “tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.” This freeness alludes to the fact that this dislodging did not lead to chaos but rather a multidisciplinary artistic community that redefined LA.

Continue reading after the jump.

Superdesk Strikes Back: Clive Wilkinson’s Undulating Design Tickles the New Yorker

Architecture, East, Eavesdroplet
Wednesday, May 21, 2014
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(Courtesy New Yorker; The Barbarian Group)

(Courtesy New Yorker; The Barbarian Group)

It’s hard enough for west coast firms to make it into architecture publications, but Clive Wilkinson has made it into the vaunted pages of the New Yorker. In the “Talk of the Town,” writer Nick Paumgarten describes Wilkinson’s thousand-foot-long, resin-topped “superdesk,” which he designed for New York ad agency Barbarian Group in Chelsea, as “swerving around the giant loft space like a mega slot-car track.” Barbarian calls the desk “4,400 square feet of undulating, unbroken awesomeness to keep people and ideas flowing.” In fact the desk even played a major role in a recent company party, and Paumgarten wondered if the desk itself might be taking on human characteristics: “One got a sense, after a while, that the superdesk might be capable of consciousness, that it was observing the humans as they heedlessly laughed and flirted and left glasses of wine on its carapace, and that it might be developing longings and resentments, or plotting its revenge.”

Want to Motor-Bike With Brad Cloepfil? Van Alen Has You Covered

East
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
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10-van-alen-auction

This Wednesday, the Van Alen Institute is throwing their very first Spring Party in New York City. Tickets to the benefit, taking place at the High Line Hotel, are still on sale, with a variety of price points from a standard party ticket to the high roller “Beaux-Arts Benefactor” costing $25,000. Happening alongside the party, Van Alen has partnered with Paddle8 for an auction of architectural experiences, and some of the world’s biggest names—from Iwan Baan to Richard Meier to Brad Cloepfil—have volunteered to potentially spend a little bit of their time with you. Swooning at the opportunities abounding in the auction, AN has rounded up ten of our favorite experiences up for auction we’d love to try.

Some of the more quirky lots up for bid include rummaging around Rem Koolhaas’ basement, Michael Sorkin’s whirlwind 20-minute tour of Manhattan, waking up for a 3:00a.m. breakfast with Hans Ulrich Obrist, and a Skype chat with Aaron Betsky. Each of these experiences carries an estimated value of priceless, so get over to Paddle8 (or download the app), and bid away to support the also-priceless Van Alen Institute. Bid early and often, as the auction ends on Friday, May 23.

Check out AN’s top 10 auctions after the jump.

Filed Under: 

Before & After> Baton Rouge Proposes an Ambitious Greenway Overhaul

06b-batonrouge-greenway-archpaper06a-batonrouge-greenway-archpaper

 

How the greenway might look as it passes through Expressway Park.

 

As AN reported in our latest Southwest edition, Baton Rouge and New Orleans are gearing up for changes across their respective urban landscapes with two new master plans by landscape architecture firm Spackman Mossop Michaels. The firm has shared these before and after views of the proposed Baton Rouge Greenway, which provides “a vision for a greenway that connects City-Brooks Park near LSU’s campus on the south side of the city to the State Capitol grounds to the north, while stitching together adjoining neighborhoods and other smaller landscaped areas along the way” Slide back and forth to see existing conditions and SMM’s plans for the area and be sure to learn more about the projects in AN‘s news article.

See more after the jump.

On View> Beyond Craft at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Art, On View, Southwest
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
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(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

(Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts Houston)

Beyond Craft
Museum of Fine Arts Houston
1001 Bissonnet, Houston
Through May 26

The Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection is one of the most remarkable decorative arts collections in the world, and goes a long way toward challenging the idea that there is a difference between decorative and high art. Although primarily American in scope, it also encompasses significant pieces by acclaimed international artists.

More info after the jump.

Chris Cross: Where in the World is Chris Genik?

Eavesdroplet, West
Monday, May 19, 2014
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Chris Genik. (Montage by AN)

Chris Genik. (Montage by AN)

Since architect Chris Genik left Daly Genik (now called Kevin Daly Architects) and became dean at the NewSchool of Architecture and Design in San Diego in 2010, we have lost touch with him. He’s no longer the dean, and we haven’t heard a peep about what he’s up to. If you know of his whereabouts please contact eavesdrop immediately. And speaking of Chrises, we hear that our friend Christopher Mount, who curated MOCA’s New Sculpturalism exhibition before things with Jeffrey Deitch went haywire, is opening up a gallery inside the Pacific Design Center dedicated to architectural prints and related art.

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