On View> The Outdoor Office at the Art Institute of Chicago

Midwest
Monday, May 14, 2012
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The Outdoor Office. (Courtesy AIC)

The Outdoor Office. (Courtesy AIC)

The Outdoor Office
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago
Through July 15

Jonathan Olivares takes a human-centered approach to industrial design and research. His 2011 book A Taxonomy of Office Chairs, published by Phaidon, provides an encyclopedic history of the office chair from 1840 to present day; building on this research, Olivares presents the speculative project The Outdoor Office (above). The advent of mobile communication means that work can be done outside of traditional offices and that the utility of outdoor space is no longer limited to recreation and leisure. Olivares examines how productive work environments can be created with new types of outdoor furniture and architecture, with consideration of privacy, shelter, and adaptability. The exhibition showcases the research and results of his findings, with images drawn from television, film, and existing offices, in addition to conceptual projects and models developed for new outdoor work spaces.

Cornell Chooses Thom Mayne; SOM Forges Ahead with Master Plan

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
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Cornell has made an object-ive choice in Thom Mayne. (Brnandon Thomas / Flickr)

Cornell has made an object-ive choice in Thom Mayne. (Brnandon Thomas / Flickr)

Cornell University has named 2005 Pritzker Prize winner Thom Mayne as architect for the first building at its Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island called the Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute. The selection should overshadow some sour grapes that were emanating from Stanford in the past few days regarding their losing bid. Mayne bested an all-star list, including Rem Koolhaas of OMA, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, Steven Holl, and SOM. The choice of Mayne, whose iconic building 41 Cooper Square still jams traffic at Astor Place, hints that Cornell is looking for a traffic stopper of its own on the East River.

Read More

High Holiday

East, Eavesdroplet
Friday, May 4, 2012
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The world's tallest Holiday Inn under construction in Manhattan. (Rendering via ReBusiness Online)

The world's tallest Holiday Inn under construction in Manhattan. (Rendering via ReBusiness Online)

We heard rumblings, but now it’s official—a 400-room, 50-story high Holiday Inn will be joining the ranks of downtown hotels at 99 Washington Street near the World Trade Center. It will be the world’s tallest Holiday Inn and the go-to architect for New York hotels, Gene Kaufman of Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman & Associates Architects, will be doing the honors. Kaufman’s other high-profile hotel projects, the Chelsea Hotel renovation and the new Hyatt near Union Square, seem to be moving full steam ahead, despite legal wrangling at the Chelsea. The Holiday Inn will likely open to guests by the end of this year.

On View> Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show

East
Wednesday, May 2, 2012
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(Matthias Ernstberger)

(Matthias Ernstberger)

Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show
Institute of Contemporary Art
University of Pennsylvania
118 South 36th St., Philadelphia, PA
Through August 12

While Stefan Sagmeister is known as a graphic designer, his work often subverts the boundary between design and art. For his first museum exhibition in the United States, Sagmeister will present a vision of his journey to find happiness, taking over the second-floor galleries and Ramp in addition to interstices throughout the museum. The narrative of the exhibition is structured using personal maxims as expressed through typographic investigations. Alongside these maxims appears social data from psychologists, anthropologists, and historians, contextualizing Sagmeister’s experience within the larger factors of age, gender, race, and economics. “I am usually rather bored with definitions,” Sagmeister explains. “Happiness, however, is just such a big subject that it might be worth a try to pin it down.”

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Gehry Hearts Asia.  Opus Hong Kong by Frank Gehry. (Courtesy Swire Properties) Frank Gehry’s first residential project in Asia, a twisty residential tower called Opus Hong Kong, is complete. Total project cost for the 12-story, 12-apartment building? A mere $27,000 a square foot, according to Swire CEO Martin Cubbon. “I would just quit everything and come and just work for them forever,” said Gehry on a recent press blitz in Hong Kong, where he praised the “interest and respect” he was afforded.

 

SHFT+ALT+DEL: April 27

Shft+Alt+Del
Friday, April 27, 2012
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 John Gourlay is tapped to be executive publisher of Metropolis magazine. Gourlay’s previous magazine publishing creds include Harvard Business Review, Foreign Affairs, Utne Reader, Audubon, and American Craft.

 SB Architects appoints Emilio Perez as head of its Miami office. Specializing in hospitality and mixed-use projects, Perez worked with Gensler, Portman Associates, Cap Cana Resorts, and Royal Caribbean before joining SB.

Barry Bergdoll, the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA, has been elected to the 2012 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Read More

On View> Newly Drawn: Emerging Finnish Architects

East
Friday, April 27, 2012
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Kuokkala Church by Lassila Hirvilammi. (Courtesy Center for Architecture)

Kuokkala Church by Lassila Hirvilammi. (Courtesy Center for Architecture)

Newly Drawn: Emerging Finnish Architects
The Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place
Through April 30

A shift is occurring in Finnish architecture as a new generation of firms is emboldened by a unique competition culture that allows anonymous submissions from young and established architects alike. Helsinki is undergoing a major process of renewal with the transformation of former industrial and harbor areas to new uses; as such, large-scale commissions are available to otherwise inexperienced practices with new approaches to the city, such as Kilden Performing Arts Center by ALA Architects (above) and Kuokkala Church by Lassila Hirvilammi (below).

Continue reading after the jump.

EVENT> Architecture & the Media: Design Reportage

East
Thursday, April 26, 2012
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The Architecture & the Media Series at the Center for Architecture.

The Architecture & the Media Series at the Center for Architecture.

Architecture & the Media #2: Design Reportage
Thursday, May 3
6:00-8:00pm
Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place

What drives the decisions to present architecture stories or programs? How do non-specialist reporters portray architecture and architects? Or explain architecture concepts, processes, and key milestones as a project unfolds from concept to reality? Can reporters help to demystify architects and architecture for the general public? Read More

On View> LACMA Presents Robert Adams: The Place We Live

West
Monday, April 23, 2012
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New development on a former citrus-growing estate, Highland, California, 1983. (Robert Adams/LACMA)

New development on a former citrus-growing estate, Highland, California, 1983. (Robert Adams/LACMA)

Robert Adams: The Place We Live
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles
Through June 3

In his 45 years photographing the American West, Robert Adams has documented the evolution of landscape and our relationship to it. In response to the rapid development of his surroundings in Colorado Springs and Denver, Adams began photographing a landscape marked by tract housing, highways, and gas stations. His photographs, Adams says, “document a separation from ourselves, and in turn from the natural world that we professed to love.” Nearly 300 prints showcase Adams’ career, from his early shots of Colorado’s desolate terrain to his recent works documenting migrating birds in the Pacific Northwest, with special focus on his portrayal of the Los Angeles region.

View a gallery of Robert Adams’s photography after the jump.

On View> Fred Sandback: Decades

East
Thursday, April 19, 2012
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(Adam Reich / Courtesy David Zwirner)

(Adam Reich / Courtesy David Zwirner)

Fred Sandback: Decades
David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street
Through April 21

The drawings and sculptures of Fred Sandback are the subject of a new exhibition at New York’s David Zwirner gallery. The projects are arranged by decades, representing distinct periods in the artist’s career, spanning the years 1969 to 2000. Sandback created minimalist sculptures out of simple materials in response to the architecture of specific interiors. Installations made from thin lengths of material redefine spaces, creating objects and planes by simply implying their outlines. On display are early works from the 1960s made of metal wire and cord, permutational works of the ’70s, and reliefs and site-specific projects from his late career. Drawings are included, like 16 Variationen von 2 Diagonalen Linien 1972 (above), plus the Zwirner gallery has reconstructed the interiors of Galerie Heiner Friedrich, the Munich space for which many of Sandback’s works were designed. A rare copper wire sculpture, Proposal for Heiner Friedrich, Munich, Six Rectangles, Copper Wire (Sculptural Study), spans three rooms and is a highlight of the show.

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Live Chat: So What Is Green, Anyway?

National
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
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Welcome to AN‘s live Facebook Live Stream chat on sustainability which took place on Wednesday, April 18 from 3:00 until 4:00 p.m. EST. “What is Green, Anyway” covered what exactly makes a project green, how effective green standards are, how sustainability is driving design (and whether it should), and where green design is heading. AN’s West Coast Editor Sam Lubell was joined by Angela Brooks, partner at Brooks + Scarpa, John Stein, president of Kirei, a green materials company, and Eric Corey Freed, principal at organicARCHITECTURE to discuss the issues and take your questions.

Thanks to everyone who stopped by and joined the discussion! (And don’t forget to like AN’s Facebook page to stay up-to-date with the latest architecture and design news.) Special thanks as well to our panel of experts.

Chat record & info about the experts after the jump.

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What is Green, Anyway? Join Us for an Online Conversation on Sustainability

National
Tuesday, April 17, 2012
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John Stein (left) and Angela Brooks (right) in front of the Raleigh Museum of Art by Brooks+Scarpa. (Montage by AN)

John Stein (left) and Angela Brooks (right) in front of the Raleigh Museum of Art by Brooks+Scarpa. (Montage by AN)

Join us for a live Facebook discussion, “What Is Green, Anyway?”
Wednesday, April 18
12:00 p.m. PST, 3:00 p.m. EST

You’re invited to talk about sustainability with AN‘s West Coast Editor Sam Lubell, Angela Brooks, partner at Brooks + Scarpa, and John Stein, president of Kirei, a green materials company. The open discussion will cover what exactly makes a project green, how effective green standards are, how sustainability is driving design (and whether it should), and where green design is heading.

The best part is that the questions will be all yours, answered live by our participants. To participate in “What Is Green, Anyway?,” simply visit the AN Blog tomorrow at 3:00 p.m. eastern. We’ll publish a post to the AN Blog before the event and you can join the discussion and ask questions of the experts live over Facebook Live Stream. You can even share your comments with your Facebook friends directly. See you Wednesday!

Read about the experts after the jump.

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