Relax & Recharge with The Architect’s Newspaper at the AIA Convention, Booth 4940

Midwest
Wednesday, June 25, 2014
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Are you heading to the AIA Convention? Come visit The Architect’s Newspaper at booth 4940. Meet executive editor Alan G. Brake and Midwest editor Chris Bentley from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday and Friday. Relax in design classics provided by Carl Hansen & Son. Recharge your phone. Have a coffee or water on us. Network with friends and colleagues. Or just wave! See you in Chicago!

Bjarke Ingels’ Hudson River Pyramid Growing on 57th Street

01-big57-archpaper02-big57-archpaper

 

The so-called “courtscraper“—a marriage of the European courtyard block and the American skyscraper—by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is rapidly rising on New York City‘s Hudson River waterfront. Officially called West 57 and under development by the Durst Organization, the 870,000-square-foot rental tower will stand 32-stories tall on the western edge of the starchitecture-studded 57th Street. BIG recently shared this construction view showing progress as of June 9, and we overlaid a model of the finished tower over top of it to give it a little more scale. View the before and after by sliding back and forth on the image above. The building is expected to be complete in 2015.

Letter to the Editor> Frothing Over Roth

East, Letter to the Editor
Monday, June 23, 2014
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(Roman Kruglov / Flickr)

(Roman Kruglov / Flickr)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted response to a back-page comment written by Pamela Jerome (“The Mid-Century Modernist Single-Glazed Curtain Wall Is an Endangered SpeciesAN 05_04.09.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

I applaud Pamela Jerome’s comment piece, “The Midcentury Modernist Single-Glazed Curtain Wall is an Endangered Species.” As for Emery Roth’s output of iconic single glazed curtain wall buildings, they brightened the cityscape, especially on Park Avenue. Their output reflects a design that designates a specific period in our Architectural History, no different from the Palladian Buildings that are adjacent to the Brenta Canal.

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Enter the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

Architecture, Interiors, National
Thursday, June 19, 2014
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remodelista-2014-considered-design-awards-enter-by-july-7

Have you designed the perfect home or room for yourself or a client? Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards to show off your work! Categories include best kitchen space, best living/dining space, best bedroom, best office, and best bath space. Winners will receive coverage on Remodelista as well as a bronze Jielde SI333 Desk Lamp. Entries will be judged by editors and industry experts, including AN publisher Diana Darling. Enter today—the submission deadline is July 7!

Eavesdrop> Are We Done with Architecture Petitions Yet? Zaha Hadid Faces Tokyo Backlash

Speaking of controversy, Zaha Hadid can’t catch a break! Since her stadium design for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics was unveiled, complaints have arisen about the scale and height of the project. Then two of Japan’s biggest architects—Toyo Ito and Fumihiko Maki—signed on to a petition calling for a revised design. As of press time more than 26,500 people have signed on to protest the design. Is someone’s star beginning to dim?

On View> LACMA Takes “Metropolis II” For a Spin

On View, West
Thursday, June 19, 2014
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Metropolis II. (Courtesy LACMA)

Metropolis II. (Courtesy LACMA)

Metropolis II
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
Ongoing

Metropolis II is a kinetic sculpture by American artist Chris Burden, who is probably best known for his 1971 performance piece Shoot, in which an assistant wielding a .22 rifle shot him in the left arm. Part of LACMA’s permanent collection and on view multiple times per week, the sculpture is modeled after a fast paced, frenetic modern city.

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Chicago Transit Authority’s Belmont Bypass would raze 16 parcels

Midwest, News
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
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Rendering of the proposed Belmont Bypass. (Courtesy CTA)

Rendering of the proposed Belmont Bypass. (Courtesy CTA)

As part of a plan to reorganize a busy elevated train station on Chicago’s North Side, the Chicago Transit Authority has released a list of buildings it needs to raze to ease delays for 150,000 riders daily. The mostly residential buildings, as well as 11 vacant lots, would be occupied by a train bypass CTA has proposed to help untangle the knot of Red, Purple, and Brown Line trains at the Clark junction just north of the Belmont ‘El’ station.

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Letter to the Editor> Improvising Modernism

300, 320, and 350 Park Avenue. (Courtesy WASA / STUDIO A)

300, 320, and 350 Park Avenue. (Courtesy WASA / STUDIO A)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted response to a back-page comment written by Pamela Jerome (“The Mid-Century Modernist Single-Glazed Curtain Wall Is an Endangered SpeciesAN 05_04.09.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Pamela Jerome’s thoughtful comment on mid-century modernist curtain walls raises a number of important issues that deserve further study.

Having successfully redeveloped two major twentieth century commercial buildings, I believe that those buildings are probably the least understood in all of preservation theory. They were built by unsentimental men in pursuit of trade, commerce, and wealth. There was never a moment’s hesitation to alter them time and again as tastes changed, neighborhoods evolved, and tenants came and went. Those commercial cultural issues are just as important as the aesthetic issues inevitably associated with any building, and they are very hard to reconcile.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Towers by Thomas Leeser and Enrique Norten Break Ground in Brooklyn

Enrique Norten's tower along Flatbush Avenue (left) and Thomas Leeser's hotel are under construction. (Courtesy Respective Firms)

Enrique Norten’s tower along Flatbush Avenue (left) and Thomas Leeser’s hotel are under construction. (Courtesy Respective Firms)

Construction has started on two towers set to rise in the BAM Cultural District in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Unlike most new projects in the area, one of the buildings to rise off Flatbush Avenue, a 32-story structure designed by Brooklyn-based architect Thomas Leeser, will not be luxury apartments, but a 200-room boutique hotel run by Marriot. The tower is one of the most architecturally distinct high-rises to arrive in Brooklyn in quite some time, with prominent, asymmetrical carve-outs along its glass facade that make it appear as if someone—or something—has slashed through its skin with a knife.

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Eavesdrop> Moss Madness: Eric Owen Moss Officially Steps Down at SCI-Arc

Eric Owen Moss.

Eric Owen Moss.

Speaking of directors stepping down, it appears the unspoken rumor that we’ve been forbidden to share for so long is now all-but official. Eric Owen Moss is indeed stepping down as the head of SCI-Arc, and a committee is in session to choose his replacement. This being SCI-Arc, everyone has an opinion about who should step in; but we won’t share anything else until we find a ripe, unsubstantiated piece of gossip telling us who it might be.

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Eavesdrop> Gehry Gossip and Koshalek Clatter: Is a Frank Gehry Museum in the works?

Richard Koshalek. (Courtesy Southern California Public Radio)

Richard Koshalek. (Courtesy Southern California Public Radio)

We’ve known for some time now that ex MOCA director Richard Koshalek has returned to Los Angeles from D.C., where he recently stepped down as director of the Hirshhorn Museum. Now we know one of his exploits: We hear that he is consulting Frank Gehry on the organization of his vast archives. Maybe this means there will someday be a Gehry museum? Certainly the architect is not getting any younger, so we may hear more soon.

Cleveland approves neighborhood plans to bring new life to first ring suburbs

City Terrain, Midwest, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
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draft_duckisland_nabe-plan-cleveland

Aerial rendering from the Duck Island neighborhood plan.

The Cleveland neighborhoods of Kinsman, Duck Island, and West 65th Street could eventually get major updates now that three new plans have won unanimous approval from the city’s planning commission. All three neighborhoods were built when Cleveland’s industrial heyday propelled a boom of real estate development that has long since given way to depopulation. In Kinsman, on the city’s far East Side, the plan proposed creating an arts and entertainment district. The Duck Island plan focused on multi-modal transportation hubs, and the plan focusing on the West 65th Street neighborhood called for a two-mile multi-purpose trail. Funding for most of the work is still undetermined, but the city has committed some money for bike lanes, curb extensions, and other local improvements already called for in the three plans.

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