Eavesdrop> Mantilini Mess: Morphosis landmarking stirs debate in Beverly Hills

(William Veerbeek / Flickr)

(William Veerbeek / Flickr)

 

 

One of Morphosis’ earliest projects, the Beverly Hills restaurant Kate Mantilini (1986), is now up for landmarking by the city of Beverly Hills. We hear that Beverly Hills Mayor Lili Bosse is obsessed with getting this done, but ironically the restaurant’s owners are not so happy about it. The rumor mill says they’re afraid of being locked into a design forever. Especially one from the 80s. Imagine if someone told you that you had to keep your 80s hair for the rest of your life?

Eavesdrop> Sign of the Times: Reflecting on Chicago Summer-Long Trump Tower Saga

Chicago's Trump Tower and its notorious sign. (edward stojakovic / Flickr)

Chicago’s Trump Tower and its notorious sign. (edward stojakovic / Flickr)

Mr. Donald Trump has bestowed upon fair Chicago an ode to his own self-worth, spurring an architectural debate that’s pulled in Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Jon Stewart, and plenty more. Grab a bag of popcorn and we’ll catch you up.

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On View> Chicagoisms at the Art Institute of Chicago

Architecture, Art, Design, Midwest, On View
Thursday, August 7, 2014
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(Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

(Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

Chicagoisms
Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Ilinois
Through January 4, 2015

Chicagoisms is an ongoing exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago that focuses on key historical principles—“Chicagoisms”—that went into creating and shaping the city that we know today. The exhibition was put together by architectural theorist Alexander Eisenschmidt and art historian Jonathan Mekinda working with designer Matt Wizinsky.

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Eavesdrop> Tettamant Booted: Could Dallas’ Nasher Sculpture Center Get a Sunlight Reprieve?

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

Thirty-four months have gone by since the Scott Johnson–designed Museum Tower hove into view and the Nasher Sculpture Center is still, er, gnashing its teeth. Every afternoon at around three o’clock glaring sunlight reflects off of the condo’s mirror like glass curtain wall, invading the Renzo Piano–designed skylit galleries, burning holes in the lawn, defoliating the trees, and no doubt increasing the air conditioning bill. Thirty-four months and nothing has been done to make it right, until June.

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Eavesdrop> Are You Gonna Go My Colorway? Lenny Kravitz designs a line of hardwood floors

kravitz-hardwood-01

Lenny Kravitz. (Courtesy BR-111)

Lenny Kravitz married Lisa Bonet. Lenny Kravitz won a bunch of Grammys. Lenny Kravitz is a member of the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres in France. Lenny Kravitz has washboard abs. Lenny Kravitz sometimes wears high heels. Lenny Kravitz produced Madonna’s “Justify My Love.” Lenny Kravitz designs hardwood floors. The flooring company BR-111 has partnered with Kravitz Design to create a line of hardwood planks that “speaks to urban elegance with a masculine vibe like touches of dark woods,” according to a release. Lenny Kravitz’s hardwood is “sure to become the gold standard in flooring.”

On View> Philbrook Museum of Art presents Allan Houser: A Celebration

Art, On View, Southwest
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
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01-allan-houser

(Courtesy Philbrook Museum of Art)

Allan Houser: A Celebration
Philbrook Museum of Art
116 East Brady Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Through November 2

Allan Houser: A Celebration is an ongoing exhibition at the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa that honors the paintings and sculptures of late Native American artist Allan Houser. The exhibition commemorates Houser’s 100th birthday this year and highlights his contributions to Native American painting and sculpture during his time as an active artist.

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Letter to the Editor> Motor City Mouthful

Detroit's Michigan Central Station. (Juan N Only / Flickr)

Detroit’s Michigan Central Station. (Juan N Only / Flickr)

[Editor's Note: The following comment was left on archpaper.com in response to the editorial “Motoring Toward Destruction?” (AN 08_06.05.2014), which parsed the wisdom of Detroit’s blight removal program.Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com. ]

I’m failing to find a thesis in here, other than wholesale demolition = bad, which is something we’re well aware of. Other considerations that weren’t even mentioned in this are aspects of public safety (arson and the use of dilapidated structures in which to commit crimes, peddle drugs, etc.) and the question of revenue (clearing blighted structures for redevelopment). The article even mentions that of the 80,000 blighted structures, we’re attempting to save more than half.

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On View> Fujiko Nakaya: Veil at the Philip Johnson Glass House

(Courtesy Philip Johnson Glass House)

(Courtesy Philip Johnson Glass House)

Fujiko Nakaya: Veil
Philip Johnson Glass House
199 Elm Street, New Canaan, CT
Through November 30

For its 65th anniversary, Philip Johnson’s Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, is hosting an exhibition by Fujiko Nakaya that utilizes the historic site itself. Veil shrouds the Glass House as well as the surrounding landscape with fog by running fresh water through high-pressure pumps. The fog will be heavily released then dissipated at set time intervals to obscure the visibility of the area and create a unique experience for visitors.

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Eavesdrop> Serpentine Slip-ons: Shoe Design Inspired by Smiljan Radic’s Pavilion

04-serpentine-shoes

Don’t have plans to visit London’s Serpentine Pavilion? Well at least your feet will be able to, sort of! Mass-market, high-design European clothier COS (reportedly opening in New York this fall) sponsored the pavilion, and has launched a line of Serpentine-inspired shoes. But while the Smiljan Radic’s structure resembles a flying saucer designed by the Flintstones, the COS kicks are decidedly demure.

Letter to the Editor> Murmurs for Mummers

okc_mummers_theater_01

John Johansen’s Mummer’s Theater. (Courtesy Elliott+Associates Architects)

[Editor's Note: The following are reader-submitted responses to the editorial “Acceptable if not Noble” (AN 03_04.30.2014_SW), which considered the imminent demolition of John Johansen’s Mummer’s Theater in Oklahoma City and the renovation of Ulrich Franzen’s Alley Theatre in Houston. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com. ]

There were local groups working hard to preserve and repurpose the Mummers Theater and conceptual plans put forth that incorporated the existing theater into a larger cultural and commercial mixed-use complex. My father supported and encouraged these efforts as an important and necessary evolution of this building, and architecture in general, to reinvent itself by adapting and embracing new ideas and technology.

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Eavesdrop> Lamster Bashing Reprieve as Dallas Accepts its Architecture Critic

Eavesdroplet, Southwest
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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mark-lamster-01

MARK LAMSTER. (COURTESY DALLAS MORNING NEWS)

Since arriving in North Texas to take up the job of Dallas Morning News architecture critic, Mark Lamster has been under a trial by fire, suffering scrutiny and criticism for everything from his Yankee origin to his unsympathetic take on the city’s built environment. Well, local opinions seem to be warming a bit to the sharp-tongued scribe. In a recent piece in the Dallas Observer, Charles Schultz went so far as to praise how quickly Lamster has come to understand Big D’s development landscape and the insider track around its so-called zoning regulations. Schultz even showed a little contrition for a previous quip: “I apologize for calling him ‘Mark Lamster, New York Pinhead’ when he first showed up.”

On View> Connecticut’s Bruce Museum presents “Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing”

Other
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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(Chen Shaoxiong)

(Chen Shaoxiong)

Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing
Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT
Through August 31

The Bruce Museum’s newest exhibition examines two of the world’s greatest art capitals: New York and Beijing. The show compares works by five New York–based artists and five Beijing-based based artists. The ten creators have been engaged in five different global, cross-cultural, artistic dialogues over the course of two years via email, Skype, and in person, sometimes with translators, about issues ranging from political and social upheaval, the concept of global culture, and questions about materials and techniques.

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