Bike Buck Naked in the Badger State

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Thursday, September 19, 2013
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milwaukee_flag

The condo couple could pull up stakes and move, but they might want to avoid Milwaukee. Bikers, if you really want to ruffle some stuck-up feathers, head to Wisconsin for brew city’s first naked bike ride. Milwaukee joins chafing masses from the likes of Chicago, Boston, New York, and Houston on July 12 next year, so get your birthday suit ready.

The Shortlist> Top Architecture & Design Competitions of the Week

National
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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The Houston Astrodome as it appeared in 2009 (Courtesy Ed Schipul)

The Houston Astrodome as it appeared in 2009 (Courtesy Ed Schipul)

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test? Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

Reimagine the Astrodome. To launch The Architect’s Newspaper’s Southwest edition and to kick-off YKK AP’s expansion in the region, AN and YKK AP are hosting an Astrodome Reuse Design Ideas Competition. Architects, artists, designers, and students from the city of Houston, the state of Texas, and across America are invited to submit their concepts on how the Astrodome might be reimagined, repurposed, and reused. First place will receive $2,500, second and third place will receive $1,000 each, and two honorable mentions will each receive $250. The top three and two honorable mentions will be published in print in AN’s inaugural Southwest edition. The registration deadline has been extended to Monday, September 23.

Registration Deadline (Extended): Monday, September 23, 2013.
Submission Deadline: Tuesday, October 1, 2013.

More after the jump.

On Track: Funding Secured for Rail Line Connecting Boston’s Innovation District

East
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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Proposed route of Track 61. (Courtesy Google / Montage by AN)

Proposed route of Track 61. (Courtesy Google / Montage by AN)

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is dedicating millions in funding 
to revive an inactive rail line, known as Track 61, to shuttle Bostonians between the bustling neighborhoods of Back Bay and the Seaport District. In the last decade, Mayor Menino has helped to transform Boston’s waterfront into a 
tech hub—accompanied by an influx of mixed-use developments—dubbed the 
Innovation District, which is now in need of better transit options to support this surge in activity. The city anticipates that the rail line will be up and running 
in roughly two years.

First Doggy Doo-Doo in Flight: HNTB Designs a Pet Potty at San Diego Airport

Eavesdroplet, West
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Are you afraid of taking Rover with you on your next flight because he might have to go potty in the airport? Well, pet-packing passengers flying through San Diego’s Lindbergh Field can rest easy. The airport’s recent $1 billion “Green Build” Terminal 2 expansion includes the nation’s first and only “pet relief” comfort station. Located between gates 46 and 47, the 75-square-foot rest room is decked out with features to get your four-legged friend in the mood to go, including ersatz grass and a fire hydrant. This may be the first, but it won’t be the last. Tom Rossbach, director of aviation architecture at HNTB, told the San Diego Union-Tribune that the firm is offering the amenity to its other airport clients.

Watch a video tour after the jump.

From The Pages Of Texas Architect: Il Duomo

Southwest
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
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The Astrodome's structure encloses so much volume that its roof provides no surrogate scale or visual weight. As experienced by visitors, the Dome's roof is a gossamer web of steel clouds drifting above the playing field, completing a vision of the cosmos and creating a new relationship between the players and the audience in the public ritual of sports. (Courtesy Texas Architect)

The Astrodome’s structure encloses so much volume that its roof provides no surrogate scale or visual weight. As experienced by visitors, the Dome’s roof is a gossamer web of steel clouds drifting above the playing field, completing a vision of the cosmos and creating a new relationship between the players and the audience in the public ritual of sports. (Courtesy Texas Architect)

[ Editor's Note: The following story, "Il Duomo," first appeared in Texas Architect's May/June 1990 issue. It was written by the late Douglas Pegues Harvey, an architect who graduated from Rice University and worked for Marmon Mok Architecture in San Antonio. It was written on the occasion of the Houston Astrodome's 25th anniversary as a sort of homage as well as a protest for the fact that the building was not chosen for the AIA Twenty-Five Year Award. Eero Saarinen's Gateway Arch was. (Incidentally, another Houston project was chosen for the 2013 25-Year Award.) We are rerunning this story, with permission, because today, September 17, is the registration deadline for Reimagine the Astrodome, AN and YKK AP's Astrodome Reuse Design Ideas Competition. Due to the overwhelming enthusiasm surrounding the competitionwe've decided to extend the registration dealing to Monday, September 23. So if you were sleeping, wake up! Sign up today! (Also, if you have the chops to write articles like "Il Duomo" and want to contribute to AN Southwest, please contact Aaron Seward, aseward@archpaper.com.) ]

It’s not every building that gets to be known as The Eighth Wonder Of The World. Texas’ nominee, the Astrodome, opened 25 years ago as the world’s finest interior landscape. On Apr. 9,1965, a time when the hegemony of television and the standing of the Sunbelt in American life were not yet secure, the Astrodome opening struck a telling blow on their behalf. The occasion was a Houston Astro’s exhibition baseball game against the New York Yankees. With President Lyndon Johnson watching, Mickey Mantle (naturally) hit the first home run, but the Astro’s (necessarily) won.

Continue reading after the jump.

Loiter Squad: Chicago Loses Bus Shelters to Avoid Loitering

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Monday, September 16, 2013
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(Courtesy StreetsBlog)

(Courtesy StreetsBlog)

Waiting for the bus was getting just a bit too pleasant, so it’s a good thing the 46th Ward removed benches from at least three locations in Uptown—an anonymous tipster told StreetsBlog that Alderman James Cappelman’s office apparently relieved several bus stops of their benches to prevent loitering. That’s the same Cappelman accused earlier this year of waging a “war on the poor” for pressuring the Salvation Army to stop feeding the poor in his ward.

But look at who’s tugging at his ear. A married couple of lawyers just tried to sue Cappelman and the Chicago Department of Transportation for besmirching the sidewalk in front of their condo with a Divvy bikeshare station. A judge dismissed their request to yank the station immediately, but they’re up for a hearing at the end of September. Another month of these blue beacons for bikers? Just think of the loiterers!

Flight Delays: “Lack of Sophistication” Delays Public Art LAX’s New Tom Bradley Terminal

Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, September 13, 2013
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Inside Fentress Architects' Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

Inside Fentress Architects’ Tom Bradley terminal at LAX. (Jason A. Knowles)

LAX finally opened its shiny new Tom Bradley terminal, designed by Fentress Architects, to quite a hullabaloo in July. The throngs who showed up for “Appreciation Days” got to enjoy shopping, music, and even free LAX keychains and knickknacks. But one of the most prominent elements was missing: the public art. Major pieces by Ball-Nogues, Pae White, and Mark Bradford were all delayed for what one participant called “a lack of sophistication on LAX’s part” in shepherding such work through. In other words, the officials didn’t get how to pull this kind of thing off. Well never fear, despite the bumps, contract disputes, and many miscues, the installations will begin opening in late September and continue through the end of the year. Better late than never.

On View> University of Nebraska presents “Look for Beauty: Philip Johnson and Art Museum Design”

Midwest, On View
Friday, September 13, 2013
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(Daniel Mirer)

(Daniel Mirer)

Look for Beauty: Philip Johnson and Art Museum Design
Sheldon Museum of Art

12th and R streets, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
Through October 13, 2013

The Sheldon Museum of Art in Lincoln, Nebraska, is currently celebrating the works of Philip Johnson, the influential American architect who promoted the International Style and, later, defined postmodernist architecture. One of his most iconic projects was the design of the Seagram building in Manhattan, a project undertaken in partnership with Mies Van Der Rohe. This particular project marked a decisive shift in Johnson’s career. Look for Beauty examines the design journey of Philip Johnson through the examination of three of his earlier museum buildings: Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (now the Sheldon Museum of Art). These three projects form a coherent study of Johnson’s developing personal style in the early years of his career. The exhibition includes models, plans, furniture, photographic murals, and archival materials such as correspondence, exhibition photographs, and catalogs.

The Shortlist> Architecture & Design Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, September 12, 2013
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Place from Space Competition

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test? Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

Place from Space. Place from Space is a design competition that explores the transformation of vacant lots in Cincinnati, Ohio into community spaces. With the goal of activating underutilized spaces to energize communities, design proposals should bring value to the neighborhood and create a sense of place, be creative and encourage community interaction, and should consider environmental impact by focusing on the deconstruction plan, re-use of materials, and productive elements of the design. The competition takes place in two parts, and the grand prize winner’s design will be constructed in 2014.

Submission Deadline: September 29, 2013.

More after the jump.

From The Pages of Texas Architect: Astrodome Update by Ben Koush

Southwest
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
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The Astrodome under construction in 1963. The structure comprises 9,400 tons of steel, 2,900 of which is in the roof alone. (Courtesy University of Houston)

The Astrodome under construction in 1963. The structure is made up of 9,400 tons of steel, 2,900 of which is in the roof alone. (Courtesy University of Houston)

[ Editor's Note: For those of you who are getting excited about The Architect's Newspaper and YKK AP's Reimagine the Astrodome design ideas competition, you have until September 17 to register. Once you've done that, take the time to read the following article, which appeared in the September/October 2013 issue of Texas Architect. Written by Houston-based architect and writer Ben Koush, it covers the current status of the Dome, what it means to Harris County, and Space City's record of not bothering to preserve its architectural heritage. ]

Ever since the Houston Oilers owner Bud Adams, in a snit after being refused a new stadium, took his football team to Nashville in 1997 and renamed it the Tennessee Titans, the fate of the Astrodome has been up in the air. Matters were made worse when, instead of rehabilitating the Astrodome a new, neo-traditionalist baseball stadium, Minute Maid Park, was built down-town for the Astros in 1999, and then in 2002, a hulking new football stadium, Reliant Center, was built uncomfortably close to its predecessor to house the replacement team, the Houston Texans, and the Houston Rodeo.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete” Opens September 6 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

Midwest
Thursday, September 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete
Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO
September 6, 2013 to October 27, 2013

From September 6 to October 27, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and chief curator Dominic Molon present Chrysler Tapete (1970) as part of the institution’s ongoing Front Room program. One of a series of wallpaper works that German artist Thomas Bayrle has produced since the late 1960s, Chrysler Tapete features the repeated image of an automobile until its distinctiveness subsides into a colossal collectiveness. The purpose is to signify the tension between positive, shared experiences and the feeling of oppressive uniformity. Bayrle, a leader in European Pop Art—frequently referred to as Grey Pop—continues to experiment with painting, sculpture, fashion, and graphic design and currently lives and works in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Through solo and group exhibitions, his objective is to uncover how our society of mass production and consumption influences our understanding of the world. Bayrle investigates how physical space, scale, and pattern influence the observer. Chrysler Tapete, consisting of silkscreen print on paper, has an intense visual presence that provides visitors with a new way to experience the exhibition space itself, a fitting role as the installation coincides with the tenth anniversary of the Contemporary Art Museum’s building.

Letter to the Editor> Master Architect or No, Gehry is Wrong About Los Angeles

Letter to the Editor, West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted comment from the AN Blog in response to the post, “Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions,” which cites an interview Frank Gehry did with Los Angeles Magazine. It appeared as a letter to the editor in a recent print edition, AN07_08.14.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The only thing that makes Los Angeles unique is that so much of it was built during the auto era (albeit on an infrastructural framework established during the interurban rail era). Different parts of Los Angeles were developed in a manner that was identical to how other cities across North America were being developed at the same time. The same succession of transportation, construction, and development technologies created a downtown in Los Angeles that is nearly indistinguishable from portions of San Francisco, Chicago, and Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

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