On View> University of Nebraska presents “Look for Beauty: Philip Johnson and Art Museum Design”

Midwest, On View
Friday, September 13, 2013
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(Daniel Mirer)

(Daniel Mirer)

Look for Beauty: Philip Johnson and Art Museum Design
Sheldon Museum of Art

12th and R streets, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
Through October 13, 2013

The Sheldon Museum of Art in Lincoln, Nebraska, is currently celebrating the works of Philip Johnson, the influential American architect who promoted the International Style and, later, defined postmodernist architecture. One of his most iconic projects was the design of the Seagram building in Manhattan, a project undertaken in partnership with Mies Van Der Rohe. This particular project marked a decisive shift in Johnson’s career. Look for Beauty examines the design journey of Philip Johnson through the examination of three of his earlier museum buildings: Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (now the Sheldon Museum of Art). These three projects form a coherent study of Johnson’s developing personal style in the early years of his career. The exhibition includes models, plans, furniture, photographic murals, and archival materials such as correspondence, exhibition photographs, and catalogs.

The Shortlist> Architecture & Design Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, September 12, 2013
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Place from Space Competition

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test? Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

Place from Space. Place from Space is a design competition that explores the transformation of vacant lots in Cincinnati, Ohio into community spaces. With the goal of activating underutilized spaces to energize communities, design proposals should bring value to the neighborhood and create a sense of place, be creative and encourage community interaction, and should consider environmental impact by focusing on the deconstruction plan, re-use of materials, and productive elements of the design. The competition takes place in two parts, and the grand prize winner’s design will be constructed in 2014.

Submission Deadline: September 29, 2013.

More after the jump.

From The Pages of Texas Architect: Astrodome Update by Ben Koush

Southwest
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
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The Astrodome under construction in 1963. The structure comprises 9,400 tons of steel, 2,900 of which is in the roof alone. (Courtesy University of Houston)

The Astrodome under construction in 1963. The structure is made up of 9,400 tons of steel, 2,900 of which is in the roof alone. (Courtesy University of Houston)

[ Editor's Note: For those of you who are getting excited about The Architect's Newspaper and YKK AP's Reimagine the Astrodome design ideas competition, you have until September 17 to register. Once you've done that, take the time to read the following article, which appeared in the September/October 2013 issue of Texas Architect. Written by Houston-based architect and writer Ben Koush, it covers the current status of the Dome, what it means to Harris County, and Space City's record of not bothering to preserve its architectural heritage. ]

Ever since the Houston Oilers owner Bud Adams, in a snit after being refused a new stadium, took his football team to Nashville in 1997 and renamed it the Tennessee Titans, the fate of the Astrodome has been up in the air. Matters were made worse when, instead of rehabilitating the Astrodome a new, neo-traditionalist baseball stadium, Minute Maid Park, was built down-town for the Astros in 1999, and then in 2002, a hulking new football stadium, Reliant Center, was built uncomfortably close to its predecessor to house the replacement team, the Houston Texans, and the Houston Rodeo.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete” Opens September 6 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

Midwest
Thursday, September 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete
Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO
September 6, 2013 to October 27, 2013

From September 6 to October 27, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and chief curator Dominic Molon present Chrysler Tapete (1970) as part of the institution’s ongoing Front Room program. One of a series of wallpaper works that German artist Thomas Bayrle has produced since the late 1960s, Chrysler Tapete features the repeated image of an automobile until its distinctiveness subsides into a colossal collectiveness. The purpose is to signify the tension between positive, shared experiences and the feeling of oppressive uniformity. Bayrle, a leader in European Pop Art—frequently referred to as Grey Pop—continues to experiment with painting, sculpture, fashion, and graphic design and currently lives and works in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Through solo and group exhibitions, his objective is to uncover how our society of mass production and consumption influences our understanding of the world. Bayrle investigates how physical space, scale, and pattern influence the observer. Chrysler Tapete, consisting of silkscreen print on paper, has an intense visual presence that provides visitors with a new way to experience the exhibition space itself, a fitting role as the installation coincides with the tenth anniversary of the Contemporary Art Museum’s building.

Letter to the Editor> Master Architect or No, Gehry is Wrong About Los Angeles

Letter to the Editor, West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted comment from the AN Blog in response to the post, “Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions,” which cites an interview Frank Gehry did with Los Angeles Magazine. It appeared as a letter to the editor in a recent print edition, AN07_08.14.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The only thing that makes Los Angeles unique is that so much of it was built during the auto era (albeit on an infrastructural framework established during the interurban rail era). Different parts of Los Angeles were developed in a manner that was identical to how other cities across North America were being developed at the same time. The same succession of transportation, construction, and development technologies created a downtown in Los Angeles that is nearly indistinguishable from portions of San Francisco, Chicago, and Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Shortlist> Top Five Competitions of the Week

National
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
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Queensway Connection: Elevating the Public Realm (Courtesy ENYA)

Queensway Connection: Elevating the Public Realm (Courtesy ENYA)

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test? Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

QueensWay Connection: Elevating the Public Realm. The Emerging New York Architects committee has announced its sixth biennial ideas competition. QueensWay Connection supports Friends of the QueensWay and the Trust for Public Land in their attempts to revitalize an abandoned elevated railway and turn it into a greenway. The competition, which is looking to supplement the ongoing feasibility study by offering ways the park can be activated and turned into a viable green space, is open to design students and professionals who have completed their education within the past 10 years. Cash prizes of up to $5,000 will be awarded.

Submission Deadline: January 1, 2014.

More competitions after the jump.

On View> “Mixtec Stonecutting Artistry: 16th Century Ribbed Vaults in Mixteca, Mexico” Opens August 24

Midwest
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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(COurtesy Goldstein Museum of Design)

(COurtesy Goldstein Museum of Design)

Mixtec Stonecutting Artistry: 16th Century Ribbed Vaults in Mixteca, Mexico
HGA Gallery Rapson Hall, Goldstein Museum of Design, University of Minnesota
89 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN
August 24, 2013 to October 13, 2013

Sixteenth century Mexico was home to buildings of extraordinary construction quality erected for the thousands of people converting to Christianity. Indigenous craftsmen utilized the most sophisticated technology and their profound understanding of locally accessible materials in an intricate system of symbiosis to collaborate with Spanish architects who were experienced with the architecture of the ribbed vault. Employing Mixtecan masonry techniques and European geometry, they collaborated to construct three churches in the Mixteca region of southern Mexico with sophisticated geometrical vaults unique to 16th century America. Through digitally scanning San Pablo Teposcolula, Santa Domingo Yanhuitlán, and San Juan Bautista Coixtlahuaca, researcher and guest curator Benjamin Ibarra-Sevilla, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Minnesota’s College of Design, was able to produce scale replicas of each gothic dome.

Mixtec Stonecutting Artistry: 16th Century Ribbed Vaults in Mixteca, Mexico, on view from August 24 to October 13, 2013, reveals the complex digital scanning, documentation, and three-dimensional modeling that facilitated the research and replication of the rib vaults in the late 20th century.

Photo of the Day> Snap, Rattle, and Roll

International
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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An earthquake interrupts a photo shoot. (Adrian Wilson)

An earthquake interrupts a photo shoot. (Adrian Wilson)

Architectural photographer, Adrian Wilson, shared this photo with AN that he snapped during a photo shoot in Mexico City today. The routine work day, this time at Casa Palacio for Jeffrey Hutchison & Associates, was abruptly interrupted by a magnitude 6.1 earthquake epicentered some 250 miles outside the Mexican capital. It was once instance, the usually-steady Wilson said, when he “couldn’t avoid camera shake…” According to news reports there was no major damage or injuries reported from the tremor.

On View> Unbuilt San Francisco Explores Architectural “What If’s” Through November

West
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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(Courtesy AIA San Francisco)

(Courtesy AIA San Francisco)

Unbuilt San Francisco
Multiple venues
San Francisco
Through November 2013

AIA San Francisco/Center for Architecture + Design, California Historical Society/SPUR, The Environmental Design Archives at UC Berkley, and the San Francisco Public Library present this ambitious collaborative exhibition of architecture that never came to be. Spread throughout five venues, Unbuilt San Francisco describes a parallel history of “what if’s” and “could have beens” of architecture and urban design that were too fantastic or too grandiose for the City by the Bay. These unrealized visions offer San Franciscans a glimpse of the hopes and ambitions of past generations, as well as provide inspiration for the future of architecture and the city. Images offered in the exhibition include a grand casino on Alcatraz, freeways encircling the city, rejected neighborhood renewal plans, alternate designs for famous landmarks including San Francisco City Hall and the Ferry Building, and ecological provocations of today’s architectural vanguard. The opening reception will be held in Annie Alley between 678 and 654 Mission Street in San Francisco on September 6 at 5:00 p.m.

(Courtesy AIA San Francisco)

Ferry Building proposal by William Merchant. (Courtesy AIA San Francisco)

The Architects Forum Welcomes Neil M. Denari to GlassBuild America

National
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
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Neil Denari, Keynote Address Speaker. (Courtesy Glass Build America)

Neil Denari, Keynote Address Speaker. (Courtesy Glass Build America)

Join AN, in collaboration with Glass Magazine, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta on September 11 for The Architect’s Forum Glass+Performance, an exciting symposium featuring keynote speaker Neil M. Denari. In addition to lunch and three-day access to the GlassBuild America trade show floor, the gathering place for North American glass, window, and door industries, attendees will have the opportunity to learn from Denari, who has taught at UCLA, Columbia, the Bartlett, UC Berkeley, Princeton, and Harvard GSD, and is the author of two bestselling books, Interrupted Projections (1996) and Gyroscopic Horizons (1999).

Continue reading after the jump.

Live At Glassbuild Architects Forum: Experts Talk Engineering Big Glass For Herzog & de Meuron’s Miami Art Museum

National
Friday, August 16, 2013
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Herzog & de Meuron's Miami Art Museum features some of the biggest expanses of glass in Miami Dade County. (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

Herzog & de Meuron’s Miami Art Museum features some of the biggest expanses of glass in Miami Dade County. (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

There are many reasons not to miss the new Architects Forum at Glassbuild this year. For one, Neil Denari will be giving the keynote speech. For two, members of the project team will be giving a presentation on the design, prototype testing, and construction of the facade of Herzog & de Meuron’s new Miami Art Museum. This unique building features integrated plantings, multiple micro climates, and some of the biggest expanses of glass in all of Miami Dade County. The presentation will be led by Peter Arbour, a facade designer with a Master of Architecture from Yale University who currently works in the New York office of German facade builder seele.

More after the jump.

The Shortlist> Top Five Competitions of the Week

National
Tuesday, August 13, 2013
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eco_porn_comp_01

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test? Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

The Eco-Porn Competition. To investigate tropes in architectural representation, Reality Cues is conducting a competition series exploring the techniques and conventions architects depend on to convey space, form, and use. The first competition of the series is called Eco-Porn. For some, the issue of sustainability has generated resourceful design, but for others has created a pressure to make architecture merely seem green. The competition aims to uncover if there is value in this deception. Three cash prizes will be awarded and the bonus round winner will receive a 6-foot tall inflatable palm tree cooler. All winners and honorable mentions will be included in Reality Cues’ premier issue of Tropes.

Registration Deadline: September 21, 2013.
Submission Deadline: September 21, 2013.

More after the jump.

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