SOM’s University Center at The New School Gets Its Green Roof

City Terrain, East
Friday, August 9, 2013
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A green roof has been installed at Parsons The New School for Design. (Susan Kramer / AN)

A green roof has been installed at Parsons The New School for Design. (Susan Kramer / AN)

A dramatic 16-story building designed by SOM has continued construction on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan. The structure will eventually open at the University Center for The New School, and with its Muntz metal (a type of brass made of copper and zinc) and glass facade now in place, most of the activity is happening behind closed doors. Or in this case, on the roof only viewable from neighboring buildings. In late July, crews installed a thin emerald necklace where the building sets back including what appears to be a variety of sedum plants commonly found on green roofs. The building is expected to be complete this fall. In the meantime, read about SOM’s unique approach to expressing circulation on the facade in an AN In Detail report.

Continue reading after the jump.

New at GlassBuild: The Architect’s Forum

National
Thursday, August 8, 2013
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denari_glassbuild_01

GlassBuild is the largest trade show for the glass industry in the United States, showcasing the latest in glass products, cutting-edge technology, and educational workshops. On September 11 in Atlanta, The Architect’s Newspaper is teaming up with Glass Magazine to create an intensive one day workshop designed specifically for architects. Featuring Neil Denari as a keynote speaker, The Architect’s Forum  will include case studies and technical workshops on both high performance and decorative glass. Presentations on materials and guided show tours compliment an in-depth look at the new glass facade of Herzog & de Meuron’s Miami Art Museum followed by a presentation on advances in structural glass. Learn more and register today here.

On View> EXPO 1: New York at MoMA PS1

East
Thursday, August 8, 2013
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Ansel Adams, Mount Williamson, Sierra Nevada, from Manzanar, California, 1944. (Courtesy MoMA PS1)

Ansel Adams, Mount Williamson, Sierra Nevada, from Manzanar, California, 1944. (Courtesy MoMA PS1)

EXPO 1: New York
MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue
Long Island City, NY
Through September 2

EXPO 1: New York is an art festival dedicated to the environmental and sociopolitical challenges of the 21st Century that runs through September 2. In addition to occupying the entirety of MoMA PS1’s Long Island City home, the show encompasses exhibitions at other venues throughout New York City, including the Rain Room at the Museum of Modern Art and the VW Dome 2 at Rockaway Beach. The festival is centered on the idea of what its curators call “dark optimism.” The exhibitions, installations, and prototypes featured in the festival suggest the end of an era plagued by climate change, economic suffering, and political strife, and the beginning of a new, brighter future. Highlights include the legendary artist-environmentalist Ansel Adams’ photographs, Meg Webster’s site-specific ecosystem Pool, and Olafur Eliasson’s glacial ice installation Your waste of time in the basement of MoMA PS1.

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Veuve Over For Eavesdrop: AN Hits Chicago Gallery Week

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Wednesday, August 7, 2013
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(Kevin Gebhardt / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Kevin Gebhardt / Flickr; Montage by AN)

Y’all remember poor old Art Chicago? Remember when we captured, in this very column, the life mimics performance art of young show-goers eating leftover pizza from the garbage? This city has struggled for years to create a world-class contemporary art show, but hopefully our highfalutin luck is about to change with the second annual Expo Chicago, opening on September 19. A few weeks ago, Bottega Veneta with the fancy PR-folks of Skoog Productions, threw a party for the host committee of Gallery Weekend (GW), which runs concurrently with Expo. Eaves isn’t exactly sure what GW is, but that’s probably because our annual art budget is only in the three figures. I think it’s for trying to convince out of town rich folks that we’re the Miami of the Midwest.

More after the jump.

On View> Robert Irwin’s “Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light” at the Whitney Museum

East
Monday, August 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Whitney Museum of American Art)

(Courtesy Whitney Museum of American Art)

Robert Irwin’s “Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light”
The Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Through September 1

It has been 36 years since Robert Irwin, now 84 years old, debuted his Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light installation at the Whitney Museum of American Art. This summer, the legendary installation, designed specifically for the fourth floor of the Breuer building, returns to the museum. As the title suggests, Irwin’s minimalist installation is composed of three simple elements: a black line that runs along the length of the gallery walls, natural light that enters through the museum’s iconic trapezoidal window, and a white translucent polyester scrim hung from the ceiling that slices through the space. These elements divide the space into various geometric forms and create a disorienting experience. As visitors circle the gallery and daylight moves across the room, the perception of space is shown to be less definite than one might previously have imagined.

Letter to the Editor> Put Out The Stars

National
Friday, August 2, 2013
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Stephan Jaklitsch.

Stephan Jaklitsch.

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted letter to the editor that ran in print edition, AN10_07.24.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

I have been writing to publications I respect in hopes of influencing the way the profession is covered. I sincerely believe that the use of “star architects” or worse, starchitects”—which is not a word—undermines serious discourse regarding architecture and urbanism. An argument could be made that the use of any popular expression or jargon undermines the seriousness of the message; I believe it is a problematic, derogatory term that is both insulting to the architects described and to the profession in general. It doesn’t serve any real purpose except to denigrate a few individuals and to signal the “hip” or “in-the-know” sense that the journalist has of himself, except that now it communicates that the user is out-of-date. If nothing else, the expression starchitect has passed its shelf life. Unfortunately, it has begun to spread to mainstream culture along with its toxic effects.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Colombia: Transformed / Architecture = Politics” at the Center for Architecture

East
Monday, July 29, 2013
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Sports Complex for the 2010 South American Games, Plan:b arquitectos + Giancarlo Mazzanti. (Sergio Gomez)

Sports Complex for the 2010 South American Games, Plan:b arquitectos + Giancarlo Mazzanti. (Sergio Gomez)

Colombia: Transformed/Architecture=Politics
Center for Architecture
536 Laguardia Place
New York, NY
Through October 26

Colombia: Transformed/Architecture=Politics, on view at the Center for Architecture through October 26, examines 11 recently built, socially-mindful developments designed by six leaders in contemporary Colombian architecture: Daniel Bonilla and Giancarlo Mazzanti from Bogotá, and Felipe Mesa, Juan Manuel Pelaez, Felipe Uribe and Orlando Garcia from Medellín. The projects in the show embody the change occurring in Latin America today and reveal themes of social inclusion in addition to inventive architectural forms and spaces.

Continue reading after the jump.

Philadelphia Courts Developers With Benjamin Franklin Parkway Hotel

East
Monday, July 29, 2013
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Philadelphia's Family Courts Building. (Courtesy Bing Maps)

Philadelphia’s Family Courts Building. (Courtesy Bing Maps)

Three developers vie for the commission to convert Philadelphia’s 72-year-old Family Court Building into a new luxury hotel. After issuing a request for qualifications last October, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. (PIDC) has selected three development teams from a pool of applicants, which include Fairmont Hotels & Resorts with Logan Square Holdings, Klimpton Hotels with P&A Associates and the Peebles Corp., and Starwood Hotel & Resorts with Dranoff Properties and HRI Properties. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the city will bring officials together from different departments, from planning to historic preservation, to oversee the review process and choose a proposal. The PIDC anticipates that an agreement will be reached with the winning developer by end of the year. A new hotel will be a coup for the area around the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which has seen an influx of activity and changes in the last few years.

On View> “Never Built: Los Angeles” Opens July 27 at the A+D Museum

West
Friday, July 26, 2013
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B+U Downey Office Building, 2009. (Courtesy B+U Architects)

B+U Downey Office Building, 2009. (Courtesy B+U Architects)

Never Built: Los Angeles
A+D Architecture and Design Museum
6032 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles
July 27–September 29th, 2013

It is difficult to envision the city of Los Angeles any differently than it exists today, but AN West editor Sam Lubell and co-curator Greg Goldin, in collaboration with Clive Wilkinson Architects, have organized an exhibition at the Architecture and Design Museum that grants visitors the rare opportunity to get a glimpse of the city as it could have been. The team gathered a diverse assortment of renderings, models, and various media depicting parks, buildings, master plans, and transportation schemes that were designed with the intention of being built, but were deemed too novel to actually be brought to life. The collection features unrealized projects, such as Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1925 Civic Center Plan, William H. Evans’s 1939 design for the Tower of Civilization, and B+U Architect’s 2009 design for an office building on Firestone Boulevard, as well as many other projects that, had they been carried out, would have completely changed the physical reality of the city of Los Angeles.

Happy 80th Mr. Rogers!

Eavesdroplet, International
Thursday, July 25, 2013
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richard_rogers_01

Richard Rogers turned 80 years old this week, making him the same age as Willie Nelson. You might think that’s a pointless comparison, but the Italian-born, British, self-described “left-winger” architect and the pot-smoking Texan Outlaw Country singer have more in common than one might at first suspect. At around the same time that Shotgun Willie was changing America by uniting the hippies and the red necks through music, Rogers and his buddy/collaborator Renzo Piano were converting critics into fawning admirers and altering the face of architecture with their design for the Centre Pompidou. “We thought of ourselves as bad boys who wanted to change the world, with the funny idea that you could do it through architecture,” is the way Piano put it in a recent article in The Guardian.

On View> MoMA presents “Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City”

East
Thursday, July 25, 2013
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Convention Hall project, Chicago. Interior perspective. 1954. (Courtesy ARS / VG Bild-Kunst)

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Convention Hall project, Chicago. Interior perspective. 1954. (Courtesy ARS / VG Bild-Kunst)

Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Through December 1

Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from July 10 to December 1, examines the essential yet overlooked role of collage in architectural representation. The exhibition places Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s early photomontages next to the cut-and-pasted experiments of artists, photographers, and graphic designers. Together, these pieces suggest an immersive “collage city,” originally conceived by Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter in the 1970s, that becomes animated through superimposing various elements.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: , , ,

Free Again?  Free Again? Cooper Union students’ 65-day occupation of the President’s office has come to an end. The board of trustees, administration, and student occupiers announced this month that the school will now reconsider its controversial decision to end its tradition of free tuition. A new proposal establishes a “Working Group”—consisting of a selection of trustees, faculty members, students, alumni, and administrators—to examine the school’s finances and come up with a strategy to reinstate its full-tuition scholarship for students. The Working Group will provide recommendations to the Board of Trustees by December 1, 2013. (Photo: Courtesy Free Cooper Union / Facebook)

 

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