New Year Brings CRA Disaster in California

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, January 3, 2012
.
The CRA's dissolution could be the final death knell for the $3 billion Grand Avenue Project (The Related Companies)

The CRA's dissolution could be the final death knell for the $3 billion Grand Avenue Project (The Related Companies)

Now that California’s Redevelopment Association (CRA) has doubled down and lost its bet with the California Supreme Court, leading to the scrapping of all the state’s CRAs, building projects across the state are in severe jeopardy. There are about 400 municipal redevelopment agencies in the state. Here are the projects in trouble for just one (albeit the largest): the Los Angeles CRA. They include nearly $100 million in grant funds to improve public infrastructure and create affordable housing and transit oriented development, the 126-unit Noho Senior Arts Colony in North Hollywood, the renovation of the historic Westlake Theater near downtown, the 35,000 square foot Wattstar Theater in Watts, the Cleantech Manufacturing Center south of downtown, and the biggest, the $3 billion Grand Avenue Project downtown. More than 20 projects in total are in danger. More to come on this huge news, including more lawsuits than you ever wanted to see.

Hollywood’s Field of Dreams? The Academy Plans an Amphitheater

West
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
.
Rendering of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' plan for an outdoor theater for screening classic films. (Courtesy AMPAS)

Rendering of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' plan for an outdoor theater for screening classic films. (Courtesy AMPAS)

Now that it’s clear that Christian de Portzamparc’s Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Museum in Hollywood will not happen (the Academy will instead reimagine the old May Company building for the museum), the Academy recently shared its plans with the LA Times to build a new amphitheater and 17,000 square foot event space on the dead project’s land. The group purchased the 3.5-acre lot near the intersection of Vine Street and Fountain Avenue in 2005 for $50 million. According to the Times, the amphitheater (to be used, of course, to screen movies) will include a raised grassy area and will seat about 300 people. Plans call for a 10,000-square-foot patio adjacent to the amphitheater designed for special events. It looks like the space is probably temporary, as Academy President Tom Sherak said the Academy will keep the space until the site’s value climbs back to its 2005 level. On second thought, this amphitheater could be here a while.

Clothing Becomes A Canopy at SCI-Arc

Dean's List, West
Monday, December 19, 2011
.

Friday's review of the two new structures (courtesy Chung Ming Lam)

For the last several years, SCI-Arc’s Studio 1A has given new students the chance to literally make their mark by producing projects that become permanent fixtures at the school. On Friday, this year’s class revealed a project that started as a piece of clothing, then became a wire model, then became a mockup, and finally ended as a new undulating and faceted canopy and wall. Made of a recycled carbon fiber called Nyloboard, the project’s more than 2,000 pieces were all hand cut and, somehow, none are exactly alike. They’re attached with Gorilla Glue, nails, and screws. “It’s something that exists at the scale of the world, which can take years for an architect,” said Nathan Bishop, who along with Jackilin Hah Bloom and Jenny Wu led the studio.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Stanford is Ennead Country

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, December 14, 2011
.

Ennead's new Anderson building would be located just west of its soon-to-be complete Bing Concert Hall. (courtesy Stanford University)

Ennead Architects (formerly Polshek Partership) seems to be taking over Stanford University one building at a time. First they built the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts in 1998. Then they finished the Stanford Law School Academic Building in 2010. They were also commissioned to build the Bing Concert Hall, which will open in 2013. And now they’ve just been chosen to build a $30.5 million, 30,000 square foot building for the Anderson Collection, a renowned compilation of post-World War II American Art. The building will also contain a library, offices, and storage spaces. Designs for the project will be released this Spring, according to Stanford. The Anderson, the Bing, the Cantor, and the new 96,000 square foot Burton and Deedee McMurtry Building, awarded in April to Diller Scofidio+ Renfro and containing undergraduate art and film studios, galleries, and an art and architecture library, will form the center of Stanford’s “arts district.”  Read More

Bergamot 2? Art-Filled Market Planned on the San Pedro Waterfront

West
Thursday, December 8, 2011
.
Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles. (Courtesy Zeno Design)

Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles. (Courtesy Zeno Design)

The developers of Santa Monica’s gallery haven Bergamot Station are planning another art center, this time in San Pedro. “Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles,” which was just approved by the Los Angeles Harbor Department (city council approval is still pending) will offer paintings, sculptures, and other artworks sold by 500 artists sitting in open stalls. The facility, set to open next summer, will be located inside the city’s warehouses No. 9 and 10, located near Cabrillo Marina. The structures, totaling 140,000 square feet, were used by the Navy during the 1940s, then later for storage. Their clerestory windows and huge doors will allow lots of light and air inside.

Continue reading after the jump.

49ers Make It Official: New Stadium in Santa Clara

West
Tuesday, December 6, 2011
.

After being on hold since its approval in June 2010 it looks like the San Francisco 49ers new stadium is finally moving forward. On Friday the team announced it had secured financing for the $1 billion project, located next to Great America theme park in downtown Santa Clara. According to the San Jose Mercury News the money is coming from Goldman Sachs, U.S. Bank, and Bank of America. The 68,500-seat stadium, designed by HNTB, will get fans closer to the field by replacing the traditional tiered bowl with a tower of suites and club spaces on its west side. Openings in the stadium will allow for exposed pedestrian plazas as well as views into and out of the building. It is one of several now being proposed for the state, as we reported a few months ago.  But it’s the first to actually move ahead. With design already drawn up construction could start as soon as the middle of next year.

Filed Under: , ,

HMC Merges Again, Expands into Phoenix

West
Monday, December 5, 2011
.

Substance Design principals Jose Donna Barry and Jose Pombo worked on the Stevie Eller Dance Theater at the University of Arizona (Tim Hursley)

Southern California-based HMC has announced its merger with Phoenix firm Substance Design Consortium. The move not only strengthens HMC’s presence in the southwest (the firm already has an office in Tempe), but it’s a homecoming for its CEO Randy Peterson, who started his career in Phoenix. The new Phoenix firm will be known as HMC+Substance Design. HMC has been busy lately gobbling up smaller firms. Earlier this year they merged with San Francisco firm Beverly Prior Architects, forming HMC+Beverly Prior Architects. At least HMC preserves some semblance of the merged firm’s previous identity with the resulting shared firm names, unlike AECOM which has erased the names of legendary firms like Ellerbe Becket, DMJM, and EDAW.

Filed Under: ,

Maltzan, BIG, and West 8 Shortlisted in St. Pete

East, West
Friday, December 2, 2011
.
Michael Maltzan's Proposal.

Maltzan's "Lens" would become the active center of St. Petersburg as well as transforming its image. (courtesy City of St. Petersburg)

The city of St. Petersburg, Florida has chosen a blockbuster group made up of Michael Maltzan Architecture, BIG (Bjarke Ingels Design) and West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture as the three finalists to redesign its famous pier. Taking a leap of faith, in 2010 the city voted to demolish the current iteration, a 1970’s inverted pyramid structure and 1980’s “festival market” that St. Petersburg’s web site refers to as “the most visible landmark in the history of the city.” But the pier’s market has fallen on hard times and the city was ready to redefine both the pier itself and the city at large. As their proposals show, any one of these three architects will give St. Pete a sculptural design that will become a new landmark, to say the least. The winner will be chosen in late January.

Check out all the proposals after the jump.

Filed Under: , , , , , ,

Help Decide Lego’s Next Architecture Model

International
Friday, December 2, 2011
.
Will Habitat 67 be the next Lego Architecture Model? (Bill Dutfield)

Will Habitat 67 be the next Lego Architecture Model? (Bill Dutfield)

Lego is giving architecture fans the chance to vote for the next model in its Architecture Series. Among the expected architectural wonders, like the Coliseum and the Eiffel Tower, more modern choices include Foster and Partners’ 30 St. Mary’s Axe (aka The Gherkin), Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67, and Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso. Current structures in the series—which began in the 60′s but was discontinued until recently— include Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, SOM’s Burj Khalifa, and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.

Filed Under: 

Architectural Desserts: Coolhaus Expands with Bricks & Mortar

West
Tuesday, November 22, 2011
.
(Andrew Echevarria)

(Andrew Echevarria)

Everybody’s favorite ice cream sandwich comes from the Coolhaus ice cream truck, where you can stuff your face with cleverly-named creations like Mies Vanilla Roe and ponder how Rem Koolhaas’ name ever got made into a dessert brand. Now Coolhaus’ owners, architects Freya Estreller and Natasha Case, who are opening Coolhaus trucks across the country and have even helped design a dog treat truck, have set up a permanent store in Culver City. The storefront abstractly references their trucks, from corrugated rubber that wraps around the service area to a windshield/menu  to chrome detailing throughout.  If you’re really ambitious you can buy make-at-home Coolhaus kits including hand-packaged dough and pints of ice cream, but you probably won’t be able to wait that long.

More images after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Gensler’s New Los Angeles Digs Filled With Energy

West
Tuesday, November 22, 2011
.
Inside the atrium at Gensler's new office. (Ryan Gobuty)

Inside the atrium at Gensler's new office. (Ryan Gobuty)

With all the news coming out of Gensler lately we’ve officially declared November Gensler Month. The latest is the firm’s new offices inside the Jewel Box building in Downtown LA, a glassy former bank branch located between huge towers at City National Plaza.

Continue reading after the jump.

Metal In Bloom at M&A

West
Friday, November 18, 2011
.

Tomorrow LA gallery Materials and Applications will open the installation “Bloom,” a twisted sculpture (video of its installation above) whose metallic surface reacts to changes in temperature and sunlight. When the metal is cool, the surface looks like a solid object, but once heated the overlapping bi-metal panels (for you non techies, that’s panels made of two different types of metal pressed together) adjust and fan out to allow for air flow and increased shade. The best part is that if you’re lucky you can actually see, and hear, this change taking place. The structure, which rests on a steel frame in M&A’s courtyard, was designed by Doris Sung and Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter with Matthew Melnyk. The opening will take place from noon to five on Saturday.

© Sam Lubell

Read More

Page 22 of 47« First...10...2021222324...3040...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License