Jitters? AIA to the Rescue

Other
Friday, October 3, 2008
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As the economic crisis continues to reverberate across the globe, everyone is feeling uneasy. Architects are particularly susceptible because the downturn stems from the housing collapse, which has crept into most ever sector of the construction industry.

Not to worry (too much). Last week, the AIA launched Navigating the Economy, a special webpage aimed at, well, helping architects navigate the economy during this time of uncertainty. Read More

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Welcome to the MAD House

East Coast, Other
Thursday, October 2, 2008
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Everybody dance now. The lobby of the new MAD.

Everybody dance now. The lobby of the new MAD.

The Museum of Art and Design held its reception for architects and designers last Friday, and while the tchotke-lined galleries were packed with fancypants and fancy glasses, AN did not spot too many boldfaces–perhaps everyone was home warming up their popcorn for the debate. We did see Barry Bergdoll, Matilda McQuade, and Karen Stein and even asked a few people what they thought of Brad Cloepfil‘s resplendent new digs. Read More

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Gerson’s Ground Zero Gambit

Other
Friday, September 26, 2008
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Alan Gerson, the City Council rep for Lower Manhattan, issued a major statement today along with the Lower Manhattan Redevelopment Committee, which he chairs. The statement lays out 17 demands the committee feels will ensure the timely opening of the memorial plaza by Septmber 11, 2011. It opens with an imposing if realistic appraisal of the challenges dogging the project so far:

The World Trade Center site is one of the most technically complicated modern construction projects ever undertaken: the building of five high rise towers, concomitantly, on a sixteen acre site over two train lines; issues of unprecedented toxicities and missing human remains; all in the middle of a bustling residential and business district. The architects, engineers and workers on the ground deserve credit for the performance of a difficult task, and interruptions, unexpected technical problems and delays should have been anticipated from its inception.

Gerson said that with the economy faltering, Read More

Looking for Work?

Other
Thursday, September 25, 2008
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Will design for food. <i>Courtesy the National Archive</i>

Will design for food. Courtesy the National Archive

As you already know, things aren’t going so well for architects right now, economically speaking. We got word earlier today that a certain three-letter firm laid off more than 100 employees in recent weeks, and smaller firms have been shedding staff as well. But there is hope yet. Should you be fired, that is.

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The Real McCoy

Other
Monday, September 22, 2008
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Courtesy Snohetta

During an unrelated call earlier today, Craig Dykers, head of Snohetta’s New York office and the man behind the 9/11 memorial pavilion, divulged that he was rather disappointed with the renderings that the city released last week to widespread fanfare. It’s bad enough that the design has been scaled back–like everything else on the site–but Dykers said that officials also went behind the firm’s back to have the renderings done. He was then kind enough to send along some model shots he greatly prefers. Check ‘em out after the jump.

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PARK(ing) Spaces

Other
Friday, September 19, 2008
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Always one to take our own advice, AN headed out for a stroll along Sixth Avenue at lunch today to check out a few of the PARK(ing) spaces that had been set up there by enterprising designers.

The first stop was the Yahoo! Purple Bike Park, granted not designed by anyone we know, but it was the closest to the 14th Street 2/3 Station–part of the reason AN is such a fan of PARK(ing) Day is because AN never drives. Because there were no big plots of grass around (more on that later), we failed to find the Yahoo! park on first pass. On to Cook + Fox.

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PARK(itects) Day

East Coast, Other
Friday, September 19, 2008
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In the Beginning: It all started with some chairs and a bike rack on Bedford Ave five years ago. Courtesy Transportation Alternatives

In the Beginning: It all started with some chairs and a bike rack on Bedford Ave five years ago. Courtesy Transportation Alternatives

On this brisk fall day, why not hit the park for lunch, especially since there’s one closer than you think. Today is the city’s second annual PARK(ing) Day, an event hosted by Transportation Alternatives and the Trust for Public Space where various civic and volunteer groups have taken over parking spaces citywide–if you look at the map, it’s really mostly Manhattan, and Manhattan between Houston and 34th Street at that–and turned them into “parks.”

This year has twice as many parks as last year, at a total of 50. But more than just expanding the size of the project, Transportation Alternatives wanted to test the limits of what these pocket open spaces could be. This led to a partnership with the local AIA chapter and the Center for Architecture, who led an outreach effort to get designers involved.

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Governors Island 2.0

Other
Thursday, September 18, 2008
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The Governors Island photo booth in action.

The Governors Island photo booth in action. Courtesy ESDC

The fine folks over at the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation announced yesterday that the design team for Governor’s Island has officially begun work on its tripartite master plan for the former Coast Guard outpost off the tip of Manhattan. As with most large-scale government projects, the agency is seeking public comment to inform the designs, but this time out they’ve gone the extra step of doing online outreach.

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The Economy & You, Humble Architect

Other
Thursday, September 18, 2008
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Meier, in better times. iCourtesty Cornell/i

Meier, in better times. Courtesy Cornell

There’s been a lot of questions about how the so-called credit crisis might impact the architecture and design industries. We’ve been tracking this for months, but so far no one has exactly admitted to apocalypse. Until now.

At a Vanity Fair party on Monday–the day the Dow dropped 504 points–man about town Richard Meier had some dour words for the Observer:

Read More

Buon Giorno!

Eavesdroplet
Tuesday, September 9, 2008
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Welcome to the new blog of The Architect’s Newspaper. As you can already tell, we are inaugurating the blog from this year’s Biennale, where founding editor William Menking is serving as the commissioner of the U.S. pavilion. For the next week, you can check here for all the latest news from Bill, as well as editors Julie Iovine and Anne Guiney, on the latest news and views, parties and gossip.

But that’s not all. Archpaper.com is still the go-to source for the latest architectural news from New York, California, and beyond. But be sure to check the blog as well for web round-ups, news analysis, party pics, and, of course, Eavesdroplettes. Think of it as our work on the boards. And, like any good blog, don’t forget to leave your comments.

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