Obit> Ralph Lerner, 1950-2011

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, May 12, 2011
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Architect Ralph Lerner (photo: Lisa Fischetti).

Ralph Lerner, architect and former dean of the School of Architecture at Princeton University, died in Princeton on Saturday, May 7, following a long battle with brain cancer.

A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Lerner resigned as dean at the University of Hong Kong Department of Architecture for health reasons and returned to the United States earlier this year.

As dean of Princeton’s School of Architecture from 1989 to 2002, Lerner set the school on a strong contemporary track with wide-ranging appointments among practitioners, critical historians, and theoreticians including Liz Diller, Jesse Reiser, Mark Wigley, Beatriz Colomina, Kevin Lippert, M. Christine Boyer, and Guy Nordenson. “Ralph very much put Princeton at the center of the architectural map, through the programs, exhibitions, and publications he sponsored as well as by the sheer force of his personality,” wrote Lippert, a 1983 graduate of the School of Architecture and founder of Princeton Architectural Press, in an email. Read More

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A Dieter Rams Design, Stays Designed

Dieter Rams and his 606 Universal Shelving System at the Vitsoe Showroom.

When Dieter Rams enters a new country, he doesn’t like to call himself a designer. Instead, the world famous German industrial designer writes “architect” on his passport entry card. In fact, it was as an architect in the early 1950s that Rams got his start building additions and installations for a little known German manufacturer just starting up, named Braun.

Continue reading after the jump.

McGuigan Tapped to Lead Arch Record

 

Cathleen McGuigan (Courtesy Architectural Record)

For a 120-year-old magazine, Architectural Record went impressively new-fangled in announcing its new editor-in-chief, Cathleen McGuigan, with word leaking out on Facebook Monday followed by rounds of Twitter and a formal blog posting at the Arc Rec website this morning.

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Live at the World Trade Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, May 2, 2011
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Media crush at One World Trade. AN/Stoelker

With our office just two blocks up from Ground Zero, we are feeling the exhilaration and pride right up to our 5th floor windows.  And when we saw NBC’s Matt Lauer at the corner Starbucks preparing for a ‘live from’ segment, we didn’t hesitate to buttonhole the guy and give him our latest timely issue—online today!—featuring a complete rundown on the Memorial Museum, along with some first views of the underground construction site that is taking shape as a museum as large as almost any in the city—with the potency of history.

Continue reading after the jump.

Is Wright Wrong on Chandigarh?

International
Friday, April 1, 2011
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Armchair from Chandigarh (Courtesy Wright Auction House)

Pierre Jeanneret armchair from Chandigarh (Courtesy Wright Auction House).

On March 31, the Wright auction house gingerly dipped into controversy with its sale of 23 lots of office furniture from Chandigarh even as the Indian government launched a belated international campaign to recover the pieces designed by Pierre Jeanneret for the masterwork by cousin Corbusier.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hudson Yards Update

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 22, 2011
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Hudson Yards retail hub by German engineer Werner Sobek (Courtesy Related)

Related and its confrere Oxford Properties today launched a new website for Hudson Yards, with some surprises. Followers of the down & dirty rail yard turned 12 million square foot urban Elysium may be forgiven if they have forgotten some of the details of the winning scheme—we sure did. And besides that was yesterday and a master plan. Still, of all the names dropped and found, bandied about and sprinkled on for good measure, we sure do not remember Werner Sobek as a major player.

Read more after the jump.

AN Mixed Media> The Furniture Debates

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
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Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

Michael Graves discusses furniture design (BK / The Architect's Newspaper)

“Drafted: the evolving role of architects in furniture design.” It was a MAD idea: To talk about why American manufacturers don’t do the job they once did in supporting American architects and designers at making furniture. Held March 10 at the Museum of Arts & Design’s own restored and midcentury soigné auditorium, the assembled panel really knew what they were talking about:

Michael Graves recalled his early days working for George Nelson in riveting detail and why Target has dropped independent designers; Jeffrey Bernett, one of the few American designers routinely designing for B&B, summed up Italy versus Herman Miller; Gisue Hariri of Hariri & Hariri eloquently addressed why architects feel compelled to make furniture, and what happened when her architecture firm tried to go there on a larger scale; and Granger Moorhead of Moorhead & Moorhead gave great reason for everyone to hope there is another golden age, especially for New York furniture designers, just ahead.

Watch the highlight reel after the jump.

Bjarke′s Bite

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Courtesy Chris Kannen

Courtesy Chris Kannen

I assumed he would be articulate as all OMA graduates are, and I’d heard he was as intellectually entertaining as only those TED Talk types can be, but I was surprised that Bjarke Ingels, the Danish architect recently taking the city in a storm of media, could also simply converse. And he did so with ease last night in a Q&A with The Architect’s Newspaper as part of a Design Trust for Public Space council member drive at the oh-so-private Core Club. The theme was “New York After Bloomberg,” which frankly scares some people, especially architects, as the mayor has been a practically unprecedented supporter of the building arts and enlightened zoning throughout his three-term tenure.

Read more after the jump.

Antonelli Talks To Me: Upcoming Design Show at MoMA

East
Friday, February 25, 2011
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WiFi Divining Rod by Designer Michael Thompson

Senior curator in MoMA’s department of architecture and design, Paola Antonelli is also a verb. She said so herself in describing her approach to curating, in general, and particularly preparing for her upcoming summer show, Talk to Me, opening on July 24. Read More

MoMA/P.S. 1 Young Architects Program Winner Announced

East, East Coast, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 16, 2011
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Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

P.S. 1 and the Museum of Modern Art have just announced that Brooklyn-based urban design and planning firm Interboro Partners are the winners of the 2011 Young Architects Program. Now celebrating its 12th year, the honor means designing what by now is widely recognized as the liveliest party space of the summer, the outdoor plaza of P.S. 1 in Queens.

Read more after the jump.

Books, Beautiful Books

Other
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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Here’s a bandwagon worth jumping on: designers and books. The new website launched yesterday and is dedicated to sharing the reading lists and the commentaries of book-loving architects and designers from all over. Starting with 50 well-known designers naming their favorite books. (Example: High Rise by J.G. Ballard. Why? “I do have a tooth for dystopia and this is a coolly familiar one,” writes Michael Sorkin), it makes for compulsive skimming, and not a little inspiration.  Guess how many architects are Lolita fans?

The site will be updated constantly. Right now, the list is already 677 strong. Additional features include five invited commentators—one each for architecture, product design, fashion, graphics, interior design—describing their must-reads for those in the field. Commentary is encouraged at every turn.  And future pages will establish connections with not only readers but bookstores, too.

A paean to books in print, designerandbooks.com is also an education in what makes the mind of the architect tick.

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Architects with Altitude

Other
Thursday, December 9, 2010
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Towering figures in the field of architecture (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

Towering figures in the field of architecture. Click to enlarge. (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

Witold Rybczynski, smart writer, stupid article.

Last Thursday, Slate‘s respected architecture critic weighed in with the dubious notion that the shorter in height, the greater the architect. This silly notion has gone viral on the web, and we felt it was our job to rebut it with some tall figures. Here they are.

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