Video> Metropolis II Sends Miniature Cars Careening in Perfect Harmony

West
Thursday, January 12, 2012
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Metropolis II, opening at LACMA on January 14, is installation artist Chris Burden’s action-packed, raucous, optimistic view of Los Angeles sometime in the not-to-distant future. Eleven-hundred custom-made, die-cast cars, about twice the size of a Matchbox car, race through a multilevel system of 18 roadways that twist and turn and undulate amid buildings that seem vaguely familiar but are not replicas of any specific landmark (although, strangely, there is what looks like an Eiffel Tower).  The cars whip along on a plastic roadway at fantastic speeds, producing an enormous din that echoes off the gallery walls like the incessant roar of real-life freeway traffic.  HO-scale trains and 1930s-era trolley cars roll along tracks of their own, adding a cheerful nostalgia to the mix.

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LACMA Prepares its Giant Rock

West
Tuesday, September 27, 2011
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The rock is wedged against its steel transporter. (All images courtesy LACMA)

If all goes according to plan, sometime in early October an enormous boulder will leave a Riverside, California quarry and a couple of weeks later roll onto the grounds of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, to become an installation called Levitated Mass.

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Comment: Architecture Is Not Enough at Grand Avenue

West
Friday, January 7, 2011
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Map of LA's Grand Avenue; the new museum is colored red.

When Diller Scofidio + Renfro were solicited last June by Eli Broad to sketch an idea for his new archive and museum, the architects were forced to ask:  “What do you build next to Disney Hall?” Answer:  Something else.  Where Frank Gehry’s work is smooth and impenetrable, the Broad Art Foundation is porous and accessible.  The stainless steel concert hall reflects the city’s skyline; blinding sunlight bounces off its capering shell.  The Broad’s concrete veil, by contrast, is a less aggressive spectacle. At three-feet thick, and punched through with large angular openings, the new museum looks as if it is cloaked in an ice cube tray twisted by a powerful algorithm.  As, certainly, it has been, to pleasing effect. Read More

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