2012 World Architecture Festival Winners Boldly Reinvent the Urban Landscape

International
Monday, October 22, 2012
.
Garden by the Bay. Courtesy Wilkinson Eyre (Photo Credit: Craig Sheppard)

Garden by the Bay. (Craig Sheppard/Courtesy Wilkinson Eyre)

Several large-scale, eco-friendly projects at the intersection of landscape, architecture, and urbanism were honored at this year’s World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore. Building of the Year was awarded to London-based Wilkinson Eyre’s Gardens by the Bay (above), designed in collaboration with landscape architects Grant Associates in 2003 for a competition to develop a reclaimed 250-acre site adjacent to a marina in downtown Singapore. Among the other top honorees were AECOM’s Heart of Doha Masterplan, winning Future Project of the Year, and Atelier Dreiseitl’s Kallang River Bishan Park, which took Landscape Project of the Year.

Read about the winners after the jump.

Frank Gehry to Masterplan Miami’s Landmark Bacardi Complex

East
Monday, October 8, 2012
.
Bacardi Building, 1963. (Courtesy Balcony Press)

Bacardi Building, 1963. (Courtesy Balcony Press)

Frank Gehry should be plenty busy with ambitious plans to revitalize downtown Toronto and to expand Facebook’s offices on the boards. Now, Gehry has been commissioned by the National YoungArts Foundation (NYAF) to update one of Miami’s most elegant and historically significant urban spaces: The Bacardi Complex on Biscayne Boulevard.

Continue reading after the jump.

Imaginary Doors in Paris

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 3, 2012
.
Imaginary Doors. (Jonas LeClasse)

Imaginary Doors. (Jonas LeClasse)

Paris-based artist Jonas LeClasse’s Imaginary Doors (And the People Who Pass By Them) is as simple as it is beautiful. Amidst the continuous grit and grime of dirty, graffiti-filled urban walls in St. Dennis—a working-class Parisian suburb—LeClasse draws doors using chalk, provoking viewers to slow down and reflect. He then invites viewers to pause for a portrait with the “door.” Perhaps it is a gateway of sorts, a simple delineation of inside and outside, or the fact that the portrait always captures the subject within a double-frame (outside of the the door yet inside of the picture). In any case, LeClasse achieves poetry using subtle architectural gestures.

View a slideshow after the jump.

Filed Under: , , , ,

Crooked Columns Raising Eyebrows at The New School

East
Tuesday, October 2, 2012
.
South West View (Courtesy afinecompany.blogspot.com)

Southwest View (Courtesy afinecompany.blogspot.com)

If you walk down Fifth Avenue and 14th Street toward Union Square and notice a building under construction with crooked columns, don’t worry—it is not about to collapse. According to NBC New York, the SOM-designed New School University Center, previously detailed by AN, is raising eyebrows from the local community because some of its columns are slightly skewed.

But it’s no mistake. “It’s the most efficient way to carry all of the different structural loads of the building from the top of the foundation, ” Joel Towers, Parsons The New School for Design dean told NBC. The New York City Department of Buildings has confirmed there are no safety issues with the project.

 

Empire Stores in DUMBO Might Finally Get a Make-Over

East
Monday, October 1, 2012
.
Empire Stores (Photo by Julienne Schaer)

Empire Stores (Photo: Julienne Schaer via Crain’s)

The Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation issued an RFP last week seeking qualified developers to revamp the post-Civil War Empire Stores warehouse in DUMBO, according to Crain’s. The adaptive reuse project, originally drafted in 2002, has been postponed several times over the last decade due to a lack of developers willing to address the building’s “scary structural issues.” Proposals, which are due on December 10th, could add up to 70,000 square feet and two additional stories to the existing buildings. Projects must be community friendly and address design challenges at the intersection of preservation and sustainability.

A New School for The Lower East Side up in the Air.  Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (Photo Credit: Wikipedia/Yori Yanover) The massive development planned at the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA) was unanimously upheld by the New York City Council Land Use Committee on Thursday, and the Lower East Side might be getting a new school. Or not. City officials won’t decide whether to build the project—part the 1.65 million square foot development at SPURA—for at least another five years, claiming initially that the community did not need a new school. According to City Councilwoman Margaret Chin, the city will set aside 15,000 square feet in the new mixed-use buildings in case a school becomes necessary in the future. The city will also reevaluate the funding available to build it and will keep the potential space available until 2023.

 

The Doors Project: Projecting Gateways onto Obstacles

International
Friday, September 28, 2012
.
The Doors Project. (Courtesy The Doors Project)

The Doors Project. (Courtesy The Doors Project)

In an ongoing endeavor to blend public art, architecture, and urbanism by artists Siyuan and Hwee Chong, The Doors Project subversively projects a series of doors onto public spaces in Singapore, reflecting the struggles of the urban poor and underprivileged. But while commenting on despair, the real message is one of faith, hope and empowerment. “We wanted to make a statement about life, and jolt people to think,” the artists said in an interview at Yolo. “Instead of following the light at the end of the tunnel, why not carry our own lights, and create our own doors! It’s really about rolling up our sleeves, and creating the opportunities we want for ourselves.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License