Tex-Fab’s Rigidized Metal SKIN

Fabrikator
Friday, November 8, 2013
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University at Buffalo's Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano's 3xLT project won first place in Tex-Fab's SKIN. (Raf Godlewski and Stephen Olson)

University at Buffalo’s Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano’s 3xLP project won first place in Tex-Fab’s SKIN. (Raf Godlewski and Stephen Olson)

A structural, textured metal system wins first place in a competition and the chance to develop a façade with Zahner.

Reinforcing the idea that time fosters wisdom, Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano’s third iteration of a structural architectural screen was awarded first place in Tex-Fab’s digital fabrication competition, SKIN. According to Tex-Fab’s co-director, Andrew Vrana, the team’s 3xLP project was selected for its innovative façade system, which uses parametric design and digital fabrication.

The 3xLP designers’ exploration of the relationship between academia and manufacturing merged at the University at Buffalo’s (UB) Department of Architecture. Starting their collaborative research with a digital model, Bruscia and Romano solicited the help of local manufacturer Rigidized Metals, (RM), who helped realize the second stage of the project’s evolution with two thin gauge metals featuring proprietary patterns. “The project is important because we’ve partnered so closely with Rigidized Metals,” Roman told AN. “We’ve brought digital and computational expertise, and they’ve provided material knowledge for textured metal—it’s a reciprocal team.” Read More

Product> Water Retention Materials That Are Happy When Wet

Product
Friday, November 1, 2013
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Hybrid Green Roof System by Liveroof

Hybrid Green Roof System by Liveroof

The following selections can substantially aid in stormwater management, along roofs, walls, plazas, and more.

Hybrid Green Roof System
LiveRoof
This modular roofing system features Moisture Portal technology and hidden tray lips that connect the roots of each vegetation unit for even water and nutrient distribution across the entire system. In times of excess precipitation, drain channels disperse water at seven gallons per minute for each linear foot. LiveRoof features mature grasses and perennials for a monolithic appearance, but with modular benefits for maintenance and ease of installation. It comes with a 20-year module warranty.

Continue reading after the jump.

MAD Museum gets Out of Hand

Fabrikator
Friday, November 1, 2013
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The ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion by Achim Menges and Jan Knippers is part of MAD Museum's new exhibition. (Achim Menges)

The ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion by Achim Menges and Jan Knippers is part of MAD Museum’s new exhibition. (Achim Menges)

A cross-section of postdigital design work illustrates the role of parametrics in the built environment.

Spawned from his 2011 show on Patrick Jouin, Museum of Arts & Design (MAD) curator Ronald Labaco conceived Out of Hand as a more comprehensive show that clarified the role of digital design, from its capabilities to its significance in our daily lives. “People just didn’t get it,” said Labaco of Jouin’s 2011 MAD show. “Unless you’re immersed in it, it can be hard to understand so I thought if we showed something like this in the galleries again, we needed to provide information that can be digested more clearly.”

Staged across three floors of the museum, with two exterior sculptures, Labaco said the show is an important program for MAD among other New York art institutions like MoMA, Cooper Hewitt, and the New Museum. The goal to raise awareness of 3D printing is timely, by chance. “Paolo Antonelli’s Design and the Elastic Mind, and two shows from Material Connection were complements to my show for the uninitiated,” Labaco explained. Out of Hand’s broad scope includes digital designing and fabrication processes like CNC milling, digital weaving and knitting, laser cutting, and 3D printing to display how these technologies influence the built environment. “It’s a historical look at the last 8 years and works from as early as 2005 are incorporated because, in my mind, that was when the major shift between rapid prototyping and 3D printing really occurred,” said Labaco. Read More

Product> Finds from the Floor at NeoCon East 2013

East, Product
Monday, October 28, 2013
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06-Tonic-Watson-NeoCon-East-Archpaper

Tonic by Watson

The 11th edition of NeoCon East, the sister show to Chicago’s summer contract furniture fair, was held October 16 and 17. Despite the government shutdown that legally prevented some GSA employees from attending,  more than 7,000 visitors attended the show at Baltimore‘s Convention Center to peruse the wares of over 250 exhibitors. Keynote addresses from Michael Graves—who launched a new collection of textiles with cf stinson—and Suzanne Tick were augmented with ongoing educational seminars.

Tonic
Watson
Designed in collaboration with San Francisco–based industrial design firm Mike & Maaike, the freestanding benching system (above) is designed with steel and MDF for both durability and flexibility. A center deck can support video and computer monitors, storage, and LED lamps with a concealed four-circuit, eight-wire raceway.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Mexican Treehouse

Fabrikator
Friday, October 25, 2013
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Templates for a 14-foot wooden treehouse were printed on an HP Designjet T920. (courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

Templates for a 14-foot wooden treehouse were printed on an HP Designjet T920. (courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

Francisco Saavedra fabricates a template to scale with large-format, Designjet printers from HP.

Founded in 2002, Rojkind Arquitectos is leaving an imprint across its native Mexico through a combination of civic, retail, residential, and hospitality projects. Its innovative design and production methods have garnered international recognition, particularly for projects like Nestlé’s Chocolate Museum is in Toluca and innovation lab in Querétaro, and Mexico City’s Tori Tori Japanese restaurant, but the firm also engages in smaller projects and creative diversions that explore new avenues of the design/build process.

Casa del Arbol is one such example. Conceived as an add-on for a venerable client, the project is a tree house for the family’s three young daughters. “There was a bird’s nest in the garden when we visited the site,” said Gerardo Salinas, partner at Rojkind. “And a 2-meter space between two trees in the yard was an ideal location that wouldn’t damage the existing trees.” Read More

Don’t Fuggedaboudit! Maker’s Market Furniture Showcase in Brooklyn

East, Product
Friday, October 18, 2013
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Factory Floor launches a new pop-up fair with "Maker's Market" Furniture Showcase, this weekend in Brooklyn. (courtesy Factory Floor)

Factory Floor launches a new pop-up fair with “Maker’s Market” Furniture Showcase, this weekend in Brooklyn. (courtesy Factory Floor)

Factory Floor, a new pop-up marketplace in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, will open this weekend with the “Maker’s Market” Furniture Showcase. Presented by Industry City at Bush Terminal, in collaboration with BKLYN DESIGNS and the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, more than 40 local and independent designers and manufacturers will present lighting, furniture, wall coverings, and home accessories in a 22,000-square-foot space. Design students from the Pratt Institute will also be showing their wares.

More information after the jump.

Q+A> Daniel Libeskind on Cosentino’s Dekton, Architecture, and Music

East, Features, Newsletter, Product
Friday, October 18, 2013
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Left: Daniel Libeskind (Ilan Besor); Right: Off the Wall (courtesy Cosentino)

Left: Daniel Libeskind (Ilan Besor); Right: Off the Wall (courtesy Cosentino)

At Cosentino’s launch of Dekton, AN had an opportunity to sit down with Daniel Libeskind. The world-renowned architect designed an outdoor sculpture, Off the Wall, made from the new material that weathers like stone but has manufactured advantages of specialized color, texture, and form, thanks to Cosentino’s particle sintering technology (PST) that simulates metamorphic rock formation at a highly accelerated rate. It originally debuted this spring at Salone del Mobile in Milan.

AN: You studied music in Israel. Do you find any of your classical music training to inform your design and architecture work?
Daniel Libeskind: Totally. Even though I was a virtuoso performer I continue to use that sense of my relationship to music very deeply in my work. Architecture and music are closely related in many ways. They’re both very precise: In music, even a vibration cannot be off by a single half note. And it’s the same with architecture; the geometry, the spatial character of a building must be accurate.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Twisting Tour Total

Fabrikator
Friday, October 18, 2013
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Aesthetic dynamics for the 18-story tower were designed in Rhino. (Ina Reinecke)

Aesthetic dynamics for the 18-story tower were designed in Rhino. (Ina Reinecke)

Barkow Leibinger designs a precast folded facade that puts a gentle spin on surrounding traditional architecture.

On one of the last urban tracts of available land in Berlin, Germany, local architecture firm Barkow Leibinger recently completed an 18-story tower, Tour Total. Highly visible from a neighboring train station, and the first completed project in the site’s 40-acre master plan, the tower has a raster facade with precast concrete panels that were geometrically computed in Rhino to create twisting inflections, conveying a sense of movement around the building’s four sides.

As a load-bearing facade, 40 percent of the surface is closed, and 60 percent is triple-glazed, with every other window operable. In addition to integrated energy management strategies—the first building tenant is French energy company Total—partner Frank Barkow said the firm’s extensive background in digital fabrication and research allowed the efficient development of the dynamic facade. Drawing from the surrounding, traditionally quadrilinear brick facades of the 1920s and 30s, the tower’s lines are imbued with an engrained depth that twists optically to read differently in direct sun or cloudy weather, without actually moving. Read More

Product> Finds From the Floor at Cersaie 2013

International, Product
Monday, October 14, 2013
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02-Cerim-Charme-Naturel-gris-archpaper

Charme Naturel in Gris by Cerim

Despite the economic freeze gripping much of Italy, more than 100,000 attendees—50 percent of whom came from outside the country—converged on Bologna for the 2013 edition of Cersaie, the world’s largest ceramic tile fair. In addition to daily educational sessions and a keynote from Pritzker Prize winner Rafael Moneo, 900 product exhibitors filled the halls with the newest iterations of stone and tile looks on porcelain and ceramic. Textile-influenced surfaces were particularly prevalent, as were recreations of hand-crafted, custom-made tiles thanks to more affordable production methods.

Charme Naturel
Cerim
Though nearly every company exhibiting at Cersaie 2013 boasted some kind of wood look, Cerim’s (above) stood out for its realistic color and graining, and authentically placed embossing. Available in five tones on three differently sized planks, the collection also comes in two finishes for indoor and outdoor flooring applications.

Continue reading after the jump.

Blurred Lines: SOFTlab and Cosentino

Fabrikator
Friday, October 11, 2013
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SOFTlab's ATRIUn model is on view through the month of October, as part of an ongoing exhibition featuring designs with Dekton. (Creative Whirlwind)

SOFTlab’s ATRIUn model is on view through the month of October, as part of an ongoing exhibition featuring designs with Dekton. (Creative Whirlwind)

A new exhibition helps a New York-based firm explore indoor and outdoor applications of a new building material.

Cosentino is celebrating Architecture Month with Surface Innovation, a multi-media exhibition at the Center for Architecture in New York that presents innovative applications of its new Dekton material. A combination of raw, inorganic materials found in glass, porcelain, and natural quartz, the new indoor/outdoor surfacing material is made with particle sintering technology (PST) that recreates the natural process of stone formation. The company invited six local architecture firms to design unique projects featuring the material, including SOFTlab, a design/build firm known for its mix of research, craft, and technology in large-scale installations and building projects.

For SOFTlab, working with a product that could be used for both interiors and exterior applications was an opportunity to reconcile the growing inverse relationship between the skin and volume of large buildings. “We came up with the idea of building something a little more dense than a single story or residentially scaled building, where Dekton may be used,” said Michael Svivos, founder and director of SOFTlab. “We went to a larger scale building, that blurs the inside and outside.” Read More

Product> Six Green Products to Bring Your Project Positive Energy

Product
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
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Eddy by Urban Green Energy

Eddy by Urban Green Energy

These products will keep your next project from being an energy guzzler.

Eddy
Urban Green Energy

At just six feet in height, the Eddy wind turbine features a dual axis design that evenly distributes horizontal and vertical forces along the length of the axis for durability. In moderate wind speeds, it produces approximately 750 kWh of solar-ready power. In addition to IEC-certification for Wind Turbine Safety, Noise Levels, and Power Performance, Eddy is also ISO and UL certified.

More after the jump.

W Seattle Hotel’s Parametric Pilings

Fabrikator
Friday, October 4, 2013
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Each column measures approximately 36 inches in diameter. (Boone Speed/Skylab Architecture)

One dozen columns are wrapped in a CNC milled wood solution that recalls Seattle’s cultural and maritime history. (Boone Speed/Skylab Architecture)

LIT Workshop fabricated sleek lodge poles to complement the city’s heritage.

When Starwood Properties began to reimagine a new living room concept for the W Seattle, the existing first floor space featured a disconnected bar, restaurant, and lounge area, much like the traditional layout of a formal home. Portland, Oregon–based architecture firm Skylab Architecture was charged with knocking down the visual barriers for an open floor plan that resembled a more modern, casual living space.

Several preexisting columns could not be removed for structural reasons, so a truly open plan had to be amended. “In some ways you could see them as a negative, or they could be seen as a positive,” Skylab principal Brent Grubb told AN. “We try to turn those perceived negatives into a design element and make it unique.” Researching the city’s cultural and maritime history inspired the architecture team to combine the water-worn patina of shore-front pilings with the physical mass of wooden totem poles. The solution was a parametrically streamlined form that was fabricated in modular sections for swift installation. Read More

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