Weill Cornell Medical College’s Double Skin

Envelope
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
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Outer skin of the double curtain wall features 10-and-a-half foot glass units. (Jeff Goldberg/Esto)

The outer skin of the double curtain wall features 10-and-a-half foot glass units. (Jeff Goldberg/Esto)

A research center in Manhattan gets a custom facade solution for energy efficiency and user comfort.

Ennead Architects and Heintges & Associates recently completed construction on the 475,000-square-foot Belfer Research Center, Weill Cornell Medical College’s latest expansion to Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The building’s facade includes a unique double skin system on the southern face to define the medical campus’ identity, provide ample natural light without glare to the laboratory spaces, and create a highly efficient envelope. Read More

Giant Pixel’s Binary Star Wars Canopy

Fabrikator, Interiors, West
Friday, February 7, 2014
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The steel canopy introduces a Star Wars theme with a binary translation of the trilogy's opening text. (Jasper Sanidad)

The steel canopy introduces a Star Wars theme with a binary translation of the trilogy’s opening text. (Jasper Sanidad)

A software developer gets a subtly intergalactic theme for its new San Francisco headquarters.

For the Giant Pixel corporation’s new headquarters, Studio O+A evoked the feel of a sophisticated galaxy far, far away in a renovated San Francisco workspace. With the help of Chris French Metal, Nor-Cal Metal Fabricators, and Seaport Stainless, O+A designers Denise Cherry and Primo Orpilla designed an interior environment that invokes themes from the client’s favorite movie, Star Wars, without delivering a set design for the Spaceballs parody. One of the office’s most notable features is an entry canopy constructed from ¼-inch hot rolled steel plate with laser-cut perforations that sets the office theme with a binary translation of the trilogy’s opening crawling text. Read More

Rare Architecture’s Perforated Skin Design

Envelope
Wednesday, February 5, 2014
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The custom design provide sun and privacy shading, while unifying three disparate volume. (Sue Barr)

The custom design provides sun and privacy shading, while unifying three disparate volumes. (Sue Barr)

A bespoke aluminum building skin transforms an abandoned war bunker into a high-performing boutique hotel.

Restoration hotelier Unlisted Collection recently acquired a historically listed, vacant municipal building in London’s East End that served as a set favorite for film luminaries like David Lynch. The 1910 Edwardian fore building and its utilitarian 1937 addition had served as the town hall of Bethnal Green before World War II. In order to convert the complex into a boutique hotel, Unlisted hired London-based architecture practice Rare and tasked the firm with designing an addition to the existing buildings to add space for more guest rooms and amenities, while unifying the three disparate elements into a single entity. Rare directors and founders Nathalie Rozencwajg and Michel da Costa Gonçalves answered this last charge with an ornamental screen facade that visually ties together the historic and modern buildings while also improving user comfort and environmental performance.

Read more after the jump.

Product> Scratching the Surface

International, Product
Thursday, January 30, 2014
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Phenomenon by Mutina

Phenomenon by Mutina

A surfacing material has to offer more than strong aesthetics to suit today’s interiors: It must also support occupancy health and sustainable resource management. Whether made from repurposed post consumer materials or designed to dampen noise, the following products support a healthy environment from the 
factory floor to the finished project.

Phenomenon
Mutina

Designed by Japanese artist Tokujin Yoshioka, the Phenomenon collection (features natural textures for walls and floors. Air, (pictured above), is a multidimensional mosaic of 1-inch unglazed porcelain tiles on a square foot of mesh backing. It comes in four neutral colorways with coordinating trim.

More after the jump.

Snøhetta’s Lacy Envelope in Oslo’s Barcode District

Architecture, Envelope, International
Wednesday, January 29, 2014
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The Deloitte Building envelope is composed of 650 white aluminum and glass panels. (courtesy Snøhetta)

The Deloitte Building envelope is composed of 650 white aluminum and glass panels. (courtesy Snøhetta)

A custom designed, prefabricated panel system of white aluminum and glass brings a softer aesthetic to a new development in Norway.

For the Barcode district in Norway—a new, mixed-use high-rise development along the waterfront in central Oslo—the architectural arm of design firm Snøhetta recently completed a 215,000-square-foot building. Two retail levels and 12 levels of workspace for real estate firm Deloitte are wrapped in a prefabricated aluminum and triple-glazed glass facade. Designed to establish a new presence in the Oslo skyline, the firm developed the facade to stand out within the guidelines of the rectilinear master plan and maintains the overall rhythm of the district’s high rises.

Continue reading after the jump.

Nervous System’s 4D Printing Software

Fabrikator
Friday, January 24, 2014
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A proprietary hinge design connects rigid panels of various sizes and configures pieces to fold like fabric. (courtesy Nervous System)

A proprietary hinging system connects rigid panels of various sizes and configures to fold like fabric. (courtesy Nervous System)

A new program prints folded shapes to achieve large finished products that move like fabric.

Digital design dynamo Nervous System has released proprietary 4D printing software that allows 3D-printing enthusiasts to produce flexible, three-dimensional shapes on selective laser sintering devices. The concept came from a partnership with Motorola to design a fast and efficient platform to print anything, anywhere, but the company’s designer and founder, Jesse Louis-Rosenberg, said the technology is just not there yet. “You’ve got the tools to make anything, but speed doesn’t afford dimensionality, so it’s counter-intuitive.” To push against those boundaries, their system prints complex, foldable shapes from articulated modules that can unfold into a larger form. Read More

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Bierman Henket Architect’s Cloud-Based Museum Design

Envelope
Wednesday, January 22, 2014
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A horizontal band of glass separates the old structure from the new addition. (Joep Jacobs)

A horizontal band of glass separates the old structure from the new addition. (Joep Jacobs)

A neoclassical museum in the Netherlands gets an iconic update and vertical expansion of ceramic and glass.

The Museum de Fundatie in Zwolle, the Netherlands, houses an international collection of art and sculpture. Its venerable neoclassical edifice symbolizes the city’s rise from its Medieval foundations into the 19th century period of enlightenment. Designed in 1840 by Eduard Louis de Coninck, the building reflects the dissolution of feudalism and a dynamic, forward-thinking perspective on the future. Now, a recent expansion of the museum has shown that the city has not stopped evolving, but is in fact moving quite steadily into the 21st century. The elliptical, organically formed addition, designed by Bierman Henket Architecten, perches atop the 19th century structure, its textured ceramic facade evincing a progressive aesthetic hitherto unknown to this sleepy Dutch town.

Read More

AN Launches Newsletter on Building Facade Technology

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, January 21, 2014
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(BRAD FEINKNOPF/FEINKNOPF / MONTAGE BY AN)

(BRAD FEINKNOPF/FEINKNOPF / MONTAGE BY AN)

To compliment our acclaimed national education conference, Facades+, The Architect’s Newspaper has launched a brand new editorial series to bring readers the most innovative building envelopes on some of the world’s most important, newly completed buildings, and the products and processes behind them. Publishing every Wednesday morning, the Facades+ Newsletter provides in-depth coverage of the newest innovations in building skins, from glass and metal to tile, wood, and composites.

Sign up to have each week’s installment delivered directly to your inbox.

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Product> Grethe Sørensen for Wolf-Gordon Textiles and Wallcoverings

Product
Monday, January 20, 2014
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Millions of Colors by Grethe Sorensen for Wolf-Gordon

Millions of Colors by Grethe Sørensen for Wolf-Gordon

This March, Wolf-Gordon will launch a collection of upholstery and wallcoverings featuring the designs of Danish textile designer Grethe Sørensen. The offerings highlight the artist’s ground-breaking technique of translating pixels to threads, most recently displayed in her exhibition Rush Hour/Shanghai 5 at Fuori Salone in Milan. Sørensen’s work often features variations of light and color found in night settings and urban landscapes, which she manipulates in Photoshop before translating on to fabric. Cooper-Hewitt plans to acquire her work once its new building opens in late 2014.

Read More

Product> Master Glass Solutions for Interiors and Facades

Product
Friday, January 17, 2014
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3form-strand-iron-Master-Glass-archpaper

Strand by 3form

As the buzzword “transparency” gains greater meaning in product specification, glass is an energy-saving, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing option.

Strand
3form
3form’s Pressed Glass is newly available in the Strand pattern (above), a compressed interlayer of fine gauge threads in three monochromatic colorways. It can be further customized through color matching, etching, and fritting options. Available in widths as large as 
48 inches and lengths of 120 inches, it can be specified in either a 5/16-inch or 1 5/16-inch gauge thickness. Its inherent strength meets ANSI Z97.1 standards.

Read More

Bing Thom Architects Takes the Stage in Washington, D.C.

Envelope
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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Bing Thom Architects designed a 650-foot long timber-backed glass curtain wall to envelope three theaters. (Nic Lehoux/courtesy Bing Thom Architects)

Bing Thom Architects designed a 650-foot long timber-backed glass curtain wall to envelope three theaters. (Nic Lehoux)

A timber-backed glass facade provides transparency, acoustical isolation, and resiliency for a historic theater complex in the nation’s capital.

When the Mead Center for Performing Arts in Washington D.C. hired Vancouver-based Bing Thom Architects to double the institution’s square footage without disturbing two historic theaters designed by treasured architect Harry Weese, it was clear to firm principal Michael Heeney that standard solutions would not suffice. For one, the theater facilities were insufficient and outdated. More troublesome, however, was the fact that passenger jet liners taking off and landing at Regan National Airport across the Potomac River were so loud they were interrupting performances. The architects had to find a solution to mitigate this cacophony both for the existing structures as well as for the expansion—a new theater called Arena Stage.

“We had to achieve acoustical separation and isolation from exterior noise in a way that was respectful and maintained the integrity of the original structures,” Heeney told AN. Building off an approach that originated from a project in Surrey, British Columbia, the design team decided to wrap the triangular-shaped complex in glass with timber column supports, topped off with a 500-foot cantilevered roof. With the help of structural engineers at Fast + Epp and facade consultancy Heintges, the team extrapolated the Surrey solution to provide even greater transparency for the existing Weese theaters, Arena Stage, and a variety of mixed use spaces totaling 200,000 square feet. Read More

LSU’s Building Design Renaissance

Architecture, Envelope, Southwest
Wednesday, January 8, 2014
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Viracon manufactured a custom double-pane insulated glass unit ceramic fritting and one-way mirroring. (Brad Feinknopf/Feinknopf)

Viracon manufactured a custom double-pane insulated glass unit ceramic fritting and one-way mirroring. (Brad Feinknopf/Feinknopf)

ikon.5 Architects designs a reflective, fritted facade in the visual tradition of the campus’ original craftsmanship.

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, New Jersey–based ikon.5 Architects had an opportunity to reinvent the image of Lousiana State University’s E.J. Ourso College of Business. The original campus, designed in 1928 by the Olmsted Group, was planned as an Italian Renaissance village, which functioned as the economic engine of Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico region for nearly 75 years. ikon.5 and local firm Coleman Partners Architects, used the circumstances of Katrina’s aftermath to give the business school a progressive image, while staying true to the University’s prescriptive aesthetic guidelines.

Maintaining the classical layout of the main square—head houses at either end with smaller classrooms lining an expanse of lawn—the design committee made several concessions in the 2012 update. In the past, guidelines dictated that all buildings feature the original craftsmen’s stucco formula, which was made from crushed white pebbles and seashells. But for the 21st century, LSU’s Design Committee decided that updating materiality would be a forward-thinking representation of the school’s influence and thus approved a new glass skin for the business school’s graduate and undergraduate classroom buildings. Read More

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