Toshiko Mori Comissioned to Redesign Center for Maine Contemporary Art

East
Thursday, November 7, 2013
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toshiko-mori-archpaper-01

Architect Toshiko Mori Will Update CMCA with New Museum Building. (Courtesy Michelle Andonian / Flickr)

With strong architectural ties in Maine and an interest in cultural building design throughout her career, New York City–based architect Toshiko Mori has been chosen to redesign the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA). Currently in the same historic Rockport firehouse since 1967, the Mori-designed CMCA will move the arts center to a larger site in the city of Rockland and update it with a building contemporaneous to the art it houses.

Work on the project is set to begin as soon as environmental and engineering tests are completed at the museum’s current site. The new center in Rockland plans an opening in time for the 2015 museum season. Of the commission, Mori stated: “I have been associated with mid-coast Maine in the last thirty years, and I am especially excited to make a contribution to promote contemporary arts in Maine.”

Public Art Fund Installation Creates a Colorful Terrain in Brooklyn

City Terrain, East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Public Art Fund)

Just Two of Us by Katharina Grosse is a sculptural landscape of color in downtown Brooklyn. (Courtesy Public Art Fund / Flickr )

Amidst the trees of MetroTech Commons in downtown Brooklyn, a vibrant architectural terrain has been formed. In an installation piece called Just Two of Us, Berlin-based artist Katharina Grosse has situated eighteen large, multi-colored sculptural forms in the wooded public space. Sponsored by the Public Art Fund, the work creates a surprising show of colors and a form that walks the line between sculpture, architecture, and painting.

View the Gallery After the Jump.

Glacial Inspiration Leads Zaha Hadid to Her Latest Curvilinear Product Design

International
Monday, November 4, 2013
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(Courtesy Jacopo Spilimbergo)

Zaha Hadid’s Newest Furniture Design: Prototype Liquid Glacial Table. (Courtesy Jacopo Spilimbergo)

Zaha Hadid has once again expanded her curvilinear design prospects. From wine bottles to superyachts, the starchitect has been quite productive in her recent development of a variety of non-architecture products, and none with right angles.

Her latest endeavor is in the world of furniture. For the current exhibition, Liquid Glacial, at David Gill Galleries in London, Hadid has unveiled a new piece in her ongoing series of ice-influenced tables. Inspired by the unique geometry of glaciers, “Prototype Liquid Glacial Table” is an evolution of the previous tables, but all explore a seemingly contradictory existence of two simultaneous states of water.

View the Gallery After the Jump.

New SimCity “Green Utopias” Offer Futuristic Glimpse of Imagined Cities

National
Monday, November 4, 2013
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SimCity: Cities of Tomorrow Allows Players to Plan Virtual Futuristic Utopias. (Courtesy EA, Inc)

SimCity: Cities of Tomorrow Allows Players to Plan Virtual Future Utopias. (Courtesy EA)

In 50 to 75 years, SimCity, the virtual city-building game just about every architect or planner has played around with at some point, imagines an average metropolis taking two routes—a sustainability-based, green utopia or a money-driven, oil-dependent corruption—and gives players the tools to construct these futures.

Continue reading after the jump. (Video)

Los Angeles Receives $100M for Affordable Transit Oriented Development

City Terrain, West
Thursday, October 31, 2013
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Los Angeles Light Rail (Courtesy Margaret Napier / Flickr)

Los Angeles Light Rail (Courtesy Margaret Napier / Flickr)

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), a national philanthropic organization that provides monetary support for the shoring up of distressed communities, has pledged $100 million in capital to lead an effort to develop 15 low-income neighborhoods in the City of Los Angeles. Under the city’s Measure R, plans for expansion of light rail and rapid bus lines within these communities are currently underway. The monetary initiative by LISC will continue development beyond transit, expanding affordable housing, schools, businesses, and community facilities, and will complete market assessments of each neighborhood to strategize locale-specific investment.

Continue reading after the jump.

Sound Artist Chris Watson Maps the Aural Landscape of Sheffield, England

City Terrain, International
Thursday, October 31, 2013
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Sheffield City Center (Courtesy Tim Webber / Flickr)

Sheffield City Center (Courtesy Tim Webber / Flickr)

Sound recordist Chris Watson has returned home for his most recent project: creating an aural map of the contemporary landscape of Sheffield, England. Two years ago, the Guardian reported, Museums Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery asked Watson to undertake the project, mapping the noises of a town he has not lived in for thirty years. Over the past 18 months, the audio artist made a series of ambisonic recordings of the natural and urban environments of the city. The result is a 36-minute sound journey, Inside the Circle of Fire: a Sheffield Sound Map, on current exhibition at the Gallery.

Hear the Sounds of Sheffield After the Jump

Jørn Utzon’s Sydney Opera House is 40! Celebrate With These 12 Amazing Photos

International
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
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Courtesy Matt Norris / Flickr

The Sydney Opera House, now a symbol of Australia and the Sydney Harbor, is 40 years old this year. (Courtesy Matt Norris / Flickr)

A big “Happy 40th Birthday” goes out to the Sydney Opera House this year, which is still looking good in its middle age. Completed by Danish architect and Pritzker Prize–winner, Jørn Utzon, in 1973, the iconic performing arts center is now an internationally renowned late modernist architectural marvel. Originally, when Utzon entered the 1956 New South Wales Government sponsored competition to envision two performance halls on the Sydney Harbor, his design was discarded. However, his “entry created great community interest” and the jury was persuaded to choose him as the sole architect in the ambitious project.

Utzon received the Pritzker Prize in 2003 and the building made the World Heritage List in 2007. The architect died one year later in Copenhagen but his vision lives on. Against a Sydney Harbor backdrop, the Sydney Opera House has become a graceful, yet dynamic symbol of Australia.

View the slideshow after the jump.

New Public Art in Brooklyn Lends Transportation a Sense of Play

East
Monday, October 28, 2013
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(Courtesy NYCDOT)

(Courtesy NYCDOT)

In Brooklyn, a new temporary public artwork brings the asphalt plane of 4th Avenue to a playful, three-dimensional life. On the avenue’s concrete median between 3rd and 4th streets, the New York City Department of Transportation’s Urban Art Program has chosen work by artist Emily Weiskopf for its latest public art installation.

Unparallel Way is a 120-feet-long sculpture comprised of two parallel aluminum strips in the same bright yellow as the double traffic lines guiding vehicles driving on adjacent roads. In a clever distortion of those painted stripes, Weiskopf’s parallel lines sweep from the ground at irregular heights, creating parabolic curves that rarely match.

Continue reading after the jump.

Open> Mathews Nielsen’s West Point Foundry Preserve Park Sustains Landscape, History

(Courtesy Elizabeth Felicella)

West Point Foundry Preserve Park (Courtesy Elizabeth Felicella)

The Village of Cold Spring, New York is set within a beautiful landscape along the Hudson River. Strewn about the bucolic landscape are the ruins of the West Point Foundry, begun by President James Madison for metal and brass production after the War of 1812. The 87-acre site housing the foundry was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the spring of 2011 and now, with partial funding assistance from a Preserve America grant and in collaboration with Scenic Hudson, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects has enhanced the historic locale as a sustainably-designed preservation park. Last week, the West Point Foundry Preserve Park officially opened to the public.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ultra-Sustainable Mushroom-Based Packaging Wins 2013 Buckminster Fuller Institute Challenge

(Courtesy Ecovative)

(Courtesy Ecovative / Flickr)

Eben Bayer and Gavin McIntyre, co-founders of Ecovative, want the world of material packaging to enter “The Mushroom Age” and they have the approval of the Buckminster Fuller Institute. Founded in 2009, the upstate New York company has developed biocompatible, strong, lightweight, and fireproof fungi-based packaging as a sustainable replacement for polystyrene foam, widely used but made of environmentally harmful plastics. In August, AN reported Ecovative’s Mushroom Packaging project as a semi-finalist in the 2013 Buckminster Fuller Institute Challenge. This week, BFI awarded the entry first place in its $100,000 competition for socially responsive design.

Continue reading after the jump.

These Winning Student Projects are the Future of Landscape Architecture

Drudge City, a landscape design project at Lake Eerie by undergraduate Penn State student Matthew D. Moffitt, wins in the 2013 ASLA General Design Category. (Courtesy ASLA)

Drudge City: Sediment Catalysis, a landscape design project at Lake Eerie by undergraduate Penn State student Matthew D. Moffitt, wins in the 2013 ASLA General Design Category. (Courtesy ASLA)

Five top student-designed landscape architecture projects across the United States have received Awards of Excellence in The American Society of Landscape Architects’ 2013 Student Awards this month. In the same categories set forth in the society’s Professional Awards, including additional Student Collaboration and Community Service groups, the competition chooses winning entrants based on demonstration of comprehensive planning, environmentally sensitive thinking, and effective presentation, among quality of design and concept. This year, no entrant in the Research category nor the Community Service category received an Award of Excellence; although Honors Awards were granted to a few projects.

The ASLA believes that these Student Awards give “a glimpse into the future of the profession.” Recipients and their projects are featured in Landscape Architecture Magazine and will be honored at a ceremony during the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in November.

View the winners after the jump

ASLA Picks The World’s Top Professional Landscape Design Projects for 2013

City Terrain, International
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
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General Design Category Winner: Lakewood Garden Mausoleum by Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc. (Courtesy ASLA)

General Design Category Winner: Lakewood Garden Mausoleum by Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc. (Courtesy ASLA)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) announced the winners of their 2013 ASLA Professional Awards, granting landscape design projects from around the world prestigious titles as top works within the field of landscape architecture. The competition included five categories: general design, residential design, analysis and planning, communications, and research. Entries are judged on their quality, context, and effectiveness, and for the two actual design categories, on their environmental sustainability and sensitivity. This year, the winning designs range from an urban revitalization in New Orleans to a book of photographic reflection on the built landscape.

View the winners after the jump.

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