Historic Tower in Downtown Cincinnati Gets New Life as Hotel

Midwest
Thursday, August 2, 2012
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The old Cincinnati enquirer building on Vine St. will get $27.3 million from Sree Hotels. (image courtesy of Ohio Office of Redevelopment.)

The old Cincinnati Enquirer building on Vine St. will get $27.3 million from Sree Hotels. (image courtesy of Ohio Office of Redevelopment.)

Seven years after the Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation embarked on its resuscitation of downtown’s signature Fountain Square, a vacant 86-year-old tower one block away is getting a $27.3 million makeover.

The former home of the Cincinnati Enquirer, the 14-story building will now house 12,000 square feet of street-level retail and a 238-room hotel. Once slated for condos, the limestone tower will instead be downtown’s fifth largest hotel, bringing the total number of rooms downtown to more than 3,000.

Continue reading after the jump.

What Moves Ohio City? Historic Cleveland Neighborhood Considers its Transportation Future

Midwest
Wednesday, August 1, 2012
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Ohio City, one of Cleveland's most vibrant neighborhoods, grew between 2000 and 2010. (Image courtesy John Dawson via Flickr.)

Ohio City, one of Cleveland’s most vibrant neighborhoods, grew between 2000 and 2010. (John Dawson/Flickr.)

Ohio City, Cleveland’s self-described artisan neighborhood, also hopes to become one of the city’s transportation hubs. A new plan proposes “a 21st Century transportation strategy” for the mixed-use area, which is home to popular destinations like the West Side Market and the Great Lakes Brewing Company.

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit’s Lafayette Towers Skirt Auction Block, For Now

Midwest
Friday, July 27, 2012
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Detroit stalled HUD's planned auction of the Mies towers. (COURTESY GEHAD HADIDI VIA FLICKR.)

Detroit stalled HUD’s planned auction of the Mies towers. (Courtesy GEHAD HADIDI/FLICKR.)

It looks like Mies van der Rohe’s Lafayette Towers in Detroit may avoid the auction block a little longer. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) foreclosed on the high-rise apartment buildings in February, and HUD had planned to put them up for auction this month (albeit with a litany of multi-million-dollar renovations required of the lucky winner).

Detroit exercised its first right of refusal on that course of action, wary of the iconic towers falling into the wrong hands. New York-based Northern Group bought the buildings in 2008 for $16 million in cash, but stopped making payments on its loans by 2010. The towers were transferred to HUD soon after. Now the city’s group for planning and facilities is seeking a private owner to bring the buildings back from disrepair.

Architects to Chicago Mayor: Save Prentice!

Midwest
Thursday, July 26, 2012
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(Courtesy AIC)

Early scheme for Prentice Women’s Hospital. (Courtesy AIC)

More than 60 architects flocked to the side of Bertrand Goldberg’s embattled Prentice Women’s Hospital Wednesday, calling on Mayor Rahm Emanuel to ensure the concrete cloverleaf’s permanent place in Chicago’s skyline.

“The legacy of Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Women’s Hospital is unmistakable. It stands as a testament to the Chicago-led architectural innovation that sets this city apart,” reads the open letter, whose cosigners include Frank Gehry, Jeanne Gang and the partners of SOM. “Chicago’s global reputation as a nurturer of bold and innovative architecture will wither if the city cannot preserve its most important achievements.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit RiverWalk gets $44 Million from Feds and State

Midwest
Wednesday, July 25, 2012
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Detroit, on the water. (Image courtesy Bernt Rostad via Flickr.)

Detroit, on the water. (Image courtesy Bernt Rostad via Flickr.)

For many years much of Detroit’s riverfront was an industrial utility, characterized by derelict manufacturing sites. But efforts to reclaim public spaces on the waterfront have made considerable progress in recent years. Now a $44 million boost from the federal government and the state of Michigan ensures transformation along the Detroit River will continue.

Continue reading after the jump.

IIT announces $30-million Innovation Center

Midwest
Tuesday, July 24, 2012
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IIT's Innovation Center will overlook the Dan Ryan Expressway. (Courtesy IIT)

IIT's Innovation Center will overlook the Dan Ryan Expressway. (Courtesy IIT)

The Illinois Institute of Technology announced last week that they will break ground next year on a 5-story “innovation center” at the university’s Bronzeville campus in Chicago. The new 100,000-square-foot building will overlook the Dan Ryan Expressway and will house academic classrooms as well as resources for entrepreneurs.

“It will combine the power of higher education,” said IIT President John Anderson, “with Chicago-style imagination, determination and boldness to fuel innovation.”

The center will house IIT’s Interprofessional Projects Program as well as high-tech workshops and computer labs. IIT will also provide space for companies at University Technology Park.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel was present for the announcement, eager to tout Chicago’s growing business community. City support will provide cost savings that Anderson said will translate into twice as many Chicago Public Schools students in its summer programs for high school students.

The Portage Lives! Church Will Not Acquire 92-year-old Chicago Theater

Midwest
Monday, July 23, 2012
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The Portage Theater, a 1920s-era theater on Chicago's northwest side, escaped acquisition by an Albany Park church. (Image courtesy Eric Allix Rogers via Flickr.)

The Portage Theater, a 1920s-era theater on Chicago's northwest side, escaped acquisition by an Albany Park church. (Eric Allix Rogers/Flickr.)

Supporters of the Portage Theater breathed a sigh of relief Thursday when it was announced a local church would withdraw their bid to acquire the 92-year-old cinema on Chicago’s northwest side. A hearing with the Zoning Board of Appeals had been scheduled for Friday, from which Chicago Tabernacle sought a special use permit to convert the theater into a house of worship.

Continue reading after the jump.

Panel Voids Architecture Contract at U of I for Conflict of Interest

Midwest
Friday, July 20, 2012
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The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Image courtesy Flickr user Miracc.)

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Miracc/Flickr)

The University of Illinois has come under fire from a state oversight board for allegedly violating state conflict-of-interest laws. A $4.6 million contract to renovate the Urbana-Champaign campus’ Natural History Building went to BLDD Architects—a central Illinois firm owned partially by a U of I planning administrator’s husband.

An advisory vote by the Procurement Board Tuesday sends the issue to the Illinois inspector general for investigation. The panel has voted twice to void the contract, but the state’s chief procurement officer for higher education vetoed the first vote.

The runner-up firms have said they will continue with BLDD’s design plans with minimal delay.

Crowd-Design: Transit Designer Wants Your Ideas, Not Just Your Money

Midwest
Thursday, July 19, 2012
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Designing Chicago celebrates the project's launch in their Logan Square studio. (Image courtesy Greater Good Studio.)

Designing Chicago celebrates the project's launch in their Logan Square studio. (Image courtesy Greater Good Studio.)

Greater Good Studio wants to reinvent crowd-sourcing. Their budding campaign, Designing Chicago, aims to build the ultimate public transit app using public data from the Chicago Transit Authority. But the interesting part is where you come in. Not only is the project crowd-funded — it’s crowd-designed.

“Since it is called public transit,” founder George Aye said in the team’s Kickstarter video, “it only made sense that we designed this application with the participation of the public.”

Videos after the jump.

Michigan Looks to Raze Derelict Homes in Detroit

Midwest
Thursday, July 19, 2012
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Demolition happening today in Detroit. (Courtesy Curbed Detroit)

Demolition happening today in Detroit. (Courtesy Curbed Detroit)

Detroit Mayor David Bing is making good on his pledge to demolish 10,000 derelict buildings in the city by the end of his first term in 2013—his administration has already taken down 4,500 abandoned structures, with another 1,500 demolitions planned by the end of September. (Five more came down this morning, and Curbed Detroit was on the scene to document the demolition.) Now the governor of Michigan, Rick Snyder, is expected to announce state support to help raze more buildings in the name of public safety.

With an initial focus on Detroit’s east, southwest, and northwest sides, the governor’s administration is currently identifying neighborhoods for a pilot program. The Michigan Land Bank, Detroit Public Schools, and the Michigan State Housing Development Authority are among the many agencies and private sector actors involved in the effort to reclaim Detroit’s wealth of abandoned and unused land.

Neighborhood stabilization and economic development have been at the core of many of Bing’s proposals as mayor. But with Wayne County facing a $155 million budget deficit, efforts to transform Detroit’s well-documented decline will have to do more with less.

Illinois To Test High-Speed Rail South of Joliet

Midwest
Tuesday, July 17, 2012
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High-speed rail in Taiwan. (Image courtesy Flickr user loudtiger.)

High-speed rail in Taiwan. (loudtiger/Flickr)

Union Pacific Railroad and Amtrak have sought permission from federal regulators to conduct the first test of high-speed rail in Illinois. A 20-mile track between the cities of Dwight and Pontiac could be a proving ground for the 110 mph passenger train starting October 1.

They would be testing a new system of triggers for highway crossing gates — one that uses radio signals to raise gates 80 seconds before a crossing in order to give the faster trains more time to slow down or stop if necessary. The current system uses track circuits to communicate, and allows the normal 79-mph trains 30 to 35 seconds of clearance before a crossing. The Illinois Department of Transportation will conduct a survey to determine whether motorists will tolerate the longer wait times.

Funding for high-speed rail was narrowly approved in California earlier this month, as Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and others continued to build on growing excitement for high-speed rail in the heartland.

Smaller Airports Struggle with Vacant Space

Midwest
Monday, July 16, 2012
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Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE)

Cleveland's airport had 1,565,187 fewer enplanements in 2009 than in 2000. (Image courtesy Cody Austin via Flickr.)

The airline industry was hit hard by the recession—2011 had fewer takeoffs than any year since 2002. Airports in cities like Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Oakland are feeling the effects of that contraction, leaving one-time regional hubs and smaller airports with vacant and underused terminals.

A report on airport building reuse commissioned last year by the Transportation Research Board found enplanements were down more than 60 percent in St. Louis over the last decade. Growing interest in regional rail transit could place further pressure on smaller airports to get creative with their extra space, especially as they face costly demolition bills and shrinking revenue.

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