EPA Proposes Encasing Gowanus Canal Sludge in Concrete for $500 Million

East
Friday, December 28, 2012
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The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Bing)

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Bing)

Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal is a Superfunded mess, filled with contaminants and often overflowing with sewage. But a new plan from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that with proper dredging to remove contaminants and a mere $500 million, the former industrial hub could potentially become the borough’s inland waterfront.

The EPA proposes targeting the canal cleanup in three phases to minimize disruption to the neighborhood. According to the NY Times Green blog, “For the first two, more heavily contaminated segments, the agency plans to dredge or ‘stabilize’ the sediment in some areas by mixing it with concrete or a similar material and then capping it with layers of clay, sand and gravel. The third segment would be dredged and capped with sand.” Additional improvements to the city’s sewer outflows at the canal could drastically improve sewage discharges by up to 74 percent. Two public meetings have been scheduled for late January to discuss the plans.

Ian Schrager Pens Deal To Build 25-Story Lower East Side Tower

East
Friday, December 28, 2012
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Site of Ian Schrager's planned tower. (Courtesy Google)

Site of Ian Schrager’s planned tower. (Courtesy Google)

Boutique hotel pioneer Ian Schrager plans to expand his newest hotel concept, Public, to New York with a new 25-story hotel and residential tower on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The Wall Street Journal reported today that Schrager and investors paid $50 million for the site at 215 Chrystie Street, once a garden for an adjacent low-income tower at 10 Stanton Street. The land was sold after tenants and the tower owner struck a deal to build a rooftop recreation area and extend affordability of the units. Schrager gained fame in the 1970s for operating the famous Studio 54 nightclub and has more recently developed the Gramercy Park Hotel and the Herzog & de Meuron-designed 40 Bond condo building, where he lives in the penthouse.

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Lowline Advocates Tout Economic Benefits of Proposed Subterranean Park

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 27, 2012
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(Courtesy Lowline)

(Courtesy Lowline)

Lowline boosters James Ramsey and Dan Barasch spoke with the Wall Street Journal this week, shedding light on a few economic details surrounding what could become New York City’s first subterranean park, built in an abandoned trolley terminal owned by the MTA underneath Delancey Street in the Lower East Side. Project co-founders Ramsey, an architect and principal at RAAD Studio, and Barasch have most recently been working on creating a full-scale mock-up of their fiber-optic skylight that will bring natural daylight to the cavernous underground space after raising $155,000 on Kickstarter.

The team is now promoting the park armed with a new economic impact summary, claiming that it will add value to the adjacent Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA). Specifically, Ramsey and Barasch argue that building the park would boost SPURA land values by $10 to $20 million and generate up to $10 million in taxes over the next 30 years. The Lowline also revealed its estimated budget, clocking in somewhere between $44 and $72 million to be paid for by a combination of fundraising, donations, and tax credits. If all goes according to plan, the Lowline could be financially self-sufficient, with a $2 to $4 million operating budget paid for by special events and commercial space. Uncertainty still looms over project, however, as the MTA hasn’t agreed that the space will be allowed to be converted into a park.

On View> Marking Time at New York’s Yossi Milo Gallery through January 19

East
Friday, December 21, 2012
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(Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery)

(Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery)

Marking Time
Yossi Milo Gallery
245 10th Avenue
New York
Through January 19

Chris McCaw’s continuing work on Sunburned, a series of photographs that began in 2006, will be displayed in his solo exhibit Marking Time. By combining a large-format camera with a high-tech lens normally used for military surveillance and inserting expired gelatin silver photo paper, McCaw captures images of the sun, exposing the paper from anywhere between 15 minutes to 24 hours. The extended exposures intensify the sun’s rays on the photo paper burning holes on the photographs. Thus, McCaw is able to capture and track the earth’s orbit around the sun. His photographs are taken at various locations across the globe including the Galapagos, the Sierras, and the Arctic Circle, enabling him to capture different rotations of the sun due to solar eclipses or equinoxes. In his image Sunburned GSP #429 (North Slope Alaska, 24 hours) McCaw captures the trajectory of midnight sun during the Arctic Circle’s summer solstice. The sun’s path dips to the horizon line then rises, marking the beginning of a new day.

Bjarke Ingels Has Phoenix Pinned, Plants Giant Observation Tower Downtown

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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BIG's proposed observation tower in Phoenix. (Courtesy BIG)

BIG’s proposed observation tower in Phoenix. (Courtesy BIG)

Phoenix-based developer Novawest wanted a new signature project for the city’s downtown, an observation tower from which to admire the far-off mountain ranges and dramatic Southwestern sunsets, so Bjarke Ingels proposed to scoop out the spiraled negative-space of New York’s Guggenheim Museum rotunda and plant it 420 feet above downtown Phoenix. Ingels’ “Pin,” a 70,000 square foot observation tower is elegant in its simple form, a ball on a stick, indeed evoking some far away Gulliver on a real-life version of Google maps finding his way to the Sun Belt. In another light, Phoenicians could ostensibly see a larger-than-life Chupa Chup or an upended mascara brush, but that’s the beauty of pure form, right?

Continue reading after the jump.

Adrian Smith+Gordon Gill’s First Manhattan Skyscraper Among the City’s Tallest

East
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
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Extells new tower will be built on 57th Street east of Broadway. (Courtesy Google)

Extells new tower will be built on 57th Street east of Broadway. (Courtesy Google)

Extell Development made waves as when they announced their 1,004-foot-tall skyscraper One57 by Christian de Portzamparc on Midtown Manhattan’s 57th Street (which made headlines most recently for crane troubles during Hurricane Sandy), but their next project a few blocks down the street looks to climb even higher. Developers announced in the Wall Street Journal on Sunday that Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture will design an 88-story, 1,550-foot-tall tower on West 57th Street just east of Broadway, an area quickly becoming known for skinny skyscraper proposals.

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Zaha Hadid to Design Residential Tower in Downtown Miami

East
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
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Zaha Hadid to design tower at 1000 Biscayne Boulevard. (Courtesy Bing Maps / Jason Schmidt)

Zaha Hadid to design tower at 1000 Biscayne Boulevard. (Courtesy Bing Maps / Jason Schmidt)

New York said no, but Miami says yes. After losing out to Norman Foster to design a tower in Midtown Manhattan, Zaha Hadid has been asked to design her first skyscraper in the Western hemisphere in downtown Miami, the Miami Herald reported. No design has been released, but the new residential tower will be located at 1000 Biscayne Boulevard on the site of a BP gas station on the city’s waterfront Museum Park, seen in red above. The site is part of a row of condo towers along the boulevard known as the “Biscayne Wall.” Developers Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman aren’t releasing details, but told the Herald the project will be officially unveiled early next year.

As AN previously reported, Hadid is also building a new parking garage in Miami, which was approved for construction in November. Elsewhere in North American, Hadid is working on a dramatic house in San Diego and has been designing smaller-scale interiors and products. Also check out renderings of Hadid’s Manhattan proposal here.

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World Trade Center Antenna Being Hoisted Into Place

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 12, 2012
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Antenna segments lifted to the top of One World Trade. (Courtesy Governor Cuomo)

Antenna segments lifted to the top of One World Trade. (Courtesy Governor Cuomo)

After a 1,500-nautical-mile voyage from Canada, half of the World Trade Center‘s antenna has arrived in New York, and, this morning, the first segments were hoisted 104 stories—over 1,300 feet above the streets of Lower Manhattan—for installation. During AN’s site tour in September, the “roots” of the antenna were clearly visible, ready to accept the structure. Building this antenna is no small effort, either. Like the scale of everything at the World Trade site, the structure is gigantic, measuring in at 408-feet tall, higher than most skyscrapers in the rest of the country. Once finished, the antenna will bring the building’s overall height to 1,776 feet.

There remains some contention on how to describe the antenna structure—as simply an antenna or, more poetically, a spire—and despite what seems a semantic argument, the results could have tall repercussions. The Port Authority and the Durst Organization—both who use the term spire—opted to remove an architectural cladding designed by SOM and artist Kenneth Snelson from the antenna earlier this year, trimming millions from the building’s price tag. Without that sculptural finish, however, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), the organization charged with ranking building heights, could opt to exclude the antenna from the overall building height, where an integrated spire would count. That would mean One World Trade won’t clock in as the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, or even the tallest in New York City.

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Light Show: Computer Controlled LED Lights Wash Park Avenue’s Helmsley Building

East
Tuesday, December 11, 2012
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230 Park Avenue awash in light. (Evan Joseph)

230 Park Avenue awash in light. (Evan Joseph)

On Monday, December 3, the “Jewel of Park Avenue” at 230 Park, aka The Helmsley Building, really began to sparkle as building-owner Monday Properties unveiled a new LED lighting display to a crowd huddled at the base of the building, staring upward with anticipation as rush hour traffic swirled around. Monday Properties President and CEO Anthony Westreich and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer stood together to push a giant red button, officially triggering the light show, which flickered into action, turning heads of passers by for blocks around as a live violinist provided musical accompaniment.

Watch a video of the lighting display after the jump.

Slideshow> Construction Update at Manhattan’s 7 Line Subway Extention

East
Tuesday, December 11, 2012
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Construction progress inside the 7 Line subway extension. (Patrick Cashin/Courtesy MTA)

Construction progress inside the 7 Line subway extension. (Patrick Cashin/Courtesy MTA)

Manhattan’s newest neighborhood at Hudson Yards broke ground one week ago today, but the West Side area can be tricky to get to using the city’s existing subway system. In 2014, however, the rumbling of trains far beneath the city’s streets will stretch west from Times Square, extending the 7 Line subway a mile and a half over to 34th Street and 11th Avenue where Hudson Yards’ first tower will be rapidly climbing at 30th Street and 10th Avenue.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has now shared a series of photos of the $2.4 billion, city-funded project, showing quite a bit of progress since AN toured the site one year ago this month. Most notable are the web of miles of conduit lining the walls and ceilings of the tunnels and the nearly complete ventilation towers rising near the Javits Center. Eventually, interior fit-ups will finish off the station’s sleek interior with curving walls designed by Dattner Architects.

View the full slideshow and a video after the jump.

Not Biking Up A Storm: New York’s Citi Bike Program Delayed Again

East
Friday, December 7, 2012
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Citibikes like this one could hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

Citi Bikes like this one could hit New York streets in May 2013. (Jesse Chan-Norris/Flickr)

New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) confirmed today what many had feared: flooding damage from Hurricane Sandy has indeed delayed New York’s beleaguered Citi Bike bike share system. As AN noted last month, electrical components of the Citibike docking stations were damaged while in storage in the Brooklyn Navy Yard along the East River. The initial rollout, now scheduled for May 2013, will include at least 5,500 bikes and 293 stations in Manhattan and Brooklyn, later expanding to 7,000 bikes by the end of 2013. The final goal is to have 10,000 bikes and 600 stations across the city.

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Hudson Yards Breaks Ground as Manhattan’s Largest Mega-Development

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 6, 2012
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The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

Tuesday morning, New York’s top power brokers gathered in a muddy lot on Manhattan’s west side to mark the official groundbreaking of the 26-acre Hudson Yards mega-development. The dramatic addition to the New York skyline will comprise a completely new neighborhood of glass skyscrapers at the northern terminus of the High Line. The South Tower, the first structure to be built and the future headquarters of fashion-label Coach, will rise on the site’s southeast corner at 30th Street and 10th Avenue, where Related CEO Stephen Ross, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and others celebrated the first turning of dirt as a large caisson machine bored into the ground.

Continue reading after the jump.

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