Kids Build Massive Model of the High Line

East, East Coast
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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Kids build a model of the High Line (Courtesy High Line Blog)

Kids build a model of the High Line (Courtesy High Line Blog)

Children from a school in the West Village love the High Line and they have a giant model to prove it.  Carol Levitt’s second grade starchitects-in-training recently finished their wood-block coup de grâce detailing the story of the famed elevated park – past and present.

Take a closer look at the model after the jump.

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Rudolph’s New York Home Passes Landmark Test

East, East Coast
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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23 Beekman Place (Courtesy Paul Rudolph Foundation)

23 Beekman Place (Courtesy Paul Rudolph Foundation)

The latest Upper East Side landmark isn’t another of its signature rowhouses, but rather what’s atop one of those brownstones.  Yesterday, the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission unanimously approved landmark status for mid-century architect Paul Rudolph‘s less-than-context-sensitive home at 23 Beekman Place.

And that’s great news for New York’s modern architectural heritage. Read More.

Video: Chinese Hotel Climbs Fifteen Stories in Six Days

International
Monday, November 15, 2010
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Chinese hotel built in just six days (DifferentEnergy Video)

Chinese hotel built in just six days (DifferentEnergy Video)

Would you stay in a 15-story structure built in six days?  Through the magic of prefabrication, one new hotel in Changsha, China was built erector-set-style at just such a fantastic pace and recorded through time-lapse photography. The better term might be constructed in six days, however, as the building’s foundation and the factory-made pieces were already finished at the beginning of this architectural ballet, but the feat proves rather amazing nonetheless.

While you might have never heard of Changsha, China, home to the new Ark Hotel, the country’s 19th largest city mirrors the building’s rapid growth.  Changsha tripled in size between the 1940s and 1980s and today contains an estimated population of 6.6 million.

While such a quickly constructed building might seem prone to shoddy construction, the Ark Hotel is reportedly built to withstand a magnitude 9 earthquake, meaning a quake over 1,000 times more powerful than January’s quake in Haiti.  Call us skeptical, but we’d opt to be out of the building when disaster strikes.

Prefabrication, architecture’s “oldest new idea,” can have its green benefits. The Ark Hotel is thermally insulated and boasts only one percent construction waste. [ Via Gizmodo. ]

Watch the construction footage after the jump.

Have Your Say On the Future of the BQE Monday Evening

East, East Coast
Monday, November 15, 2010
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Final BQE Community Meeting This Evening, Monday, November 15

Final BQE Community Meeting This Evening, Monday, November 15

It’s not too late to join community leaders from the Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, and Columbia Street Waterfront neighborhoods along with the New York City Economic Development Corporation to discuss the future of the Bronx-Queens Expressway.  The third and final BQE Community Design Workshop takes place this evening and will cover refined designed proposals aimed to reconnect areas surrounding the urban expressway.
More information after the jump.

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Zero Energy Red Hook Green Gets Zero Help From City

East, East Coast
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
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Rendering of the proposed Redhook Green project (Courtesy Jay Amato / RHG)

Rendering of the proposed Redhook Green project (Courtesy Jay Amato / RHG)

Red Hook Green gets a red light from the NYC Department of Buildings.  Brooklyn’s touted “brownstone of the future” is up against the ropes after a zoning decision ruled the mixed-use building cannot proceed as planned.  Jay Amato’s ultra-sustainable, shipping-container chic Red Hook Green was denied its proposed accessory residential use on industrially zoned land, officially throwing the entire project into limbo.

Read more after the jump.

Spooky Starchi-Lanterns Make for a Truly Haunted Halloween

East
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
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Starchi-Lanterns a scary sight this Halloween (Courtesy Abrahams-May Architects)

Starchi-Lanterns a scary sight this Halloween (Courtesy Abrahams-May Architects)

While Halloween 2010 is fast fading into blurry memory and rotting pumpkins are heading curbside, these Starchi-Lanterns featuring the glowing smiles of super-personas old and new were too good to pass up.  Designers Kyle May of Abrahams-May Architects and Julia van den Hout of Steven Holl put their heads together and came away with these sixteen spooky mugs.

It looks like Zaha and Gehry are having a swell time in the second row, while just above a stern Rem and Prince-Ramus are staring off in opposite directions.  Kudos to those who identify all the starchitects in the comments.  [ Via NY Observer. ]

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Slideshow: Zonnestraal Sanatorium Saved From Ruin

International
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
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Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Abandoned and nearly lost, the Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum, Netherlands has been meticulously restored to its former glory by Bierman Henket architecten and Wessel de Jonge architecten.  In honor of their efforts, the two firms were awarded the 2010 World Monuments Fund / Knoll Modernism Prize.  Alan Brake penned an article for the print edition of The Architect’s Newspaper:

Designed in 1926–1928 by Johannes Duiker and Bernard Bijvoet and completed in 1931, the sanatorium is considered a seminal work of early modernism. Though it was well known when it was built, the structure was eventually abandoned, and since then nearly subsumed by the surrounding landscape. Portions of the three-building complex were almost completely lost, so many parts of the sanatorium had to be meticulously reconstructed, including formerly mass-produced elements that had to be recreated by hand.

Read the entire article from The Architect’s Newspaper.

A gallery of before and after conditions after the jump.

Perkins Eastman Getting Together with EE&K

East
Friday, October 29, 2010
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Perkins Eastman joins with Ehrenkrantz, Eckstut, & Kuhn

Merger-meld: Perkins Eastman + Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn

Perkins Eastman confirmed today that the global practice is merging with Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn and the firms will be consolidating their offices in New York, Washington, D.C., and China.  When the merger is complete, the new firm – yet to be named – will have a total of nearly 600 employees, 500 from Perkins Eastman and 85 from EE&K.  Steven Yates with Perkins Eastman says no major layoffs have taken place in the past nine months and the company is not planning any layoffs as part of the merger.

Perkins Eastman is the designer behind Times Square’s glowing red stairs and a mega-project in Queens while EE&K has been busy master planning Cleveland’s waterfront.  Anyone care to take a guess at the new firm’s name?

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So You Want To Be An Architect? Think Twice

National
Friday, October 29, 2010
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Oh, to be a wide-eyed and optimistic student ready to enter architecture school and stake his or her claim in the world of starchitecture.  A humorous take on the soul-crushing, back-breaking, pain-inducing life of an architect.  Be warned, some language NSFW.

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Artist Proposes Fabric House Coat For St. Louis

Midwest
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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Rendering showing proposed House Coat installation in St. Louis (Courtesy Leeza Meksin)

Rendering showing proposed House Coat installation in St. Louis (Courtesy Leeza Meksin)

Brooklyn-based artist Leeza Meksin plans to give an historic brick structure in St. Louis a new skin – or rather a new set of clothes.  House Coat proposes wrapping over 800 yards of spandex around the two-story building, complete with stylized “corset-like fixtures in the back, weights, [and] leather.”

Read more about the project after the jump.

Slideshow: Inglewood Plan Strives For Revitalization

West
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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Scene along Inglewood's Market Street corridor (Sam Lubell)

Scene along Inglewood's Market Street corridor (Sam Lubell)

The Architect’s Newspaper‘s Sam Lubell tells us about revitalization plans for Los Angeles’ once bustling Inglewood.  Architects Christopher Mercier and Douglas Pierson of (fer) Studio see a vibrant future for Market Street:

“Nobody knows about Market Street,” said Mercier. “But it already has the infrastructure to be something special.” The street is narrow, pedestrian-friendly, and lined with shops, rich plantings, small islands, and beautiful (if not well-kempt) historic buildings along its entire length. “Everyone wants to save downtown, but they don’t have the faith in what it can be,” added Pierson.

Read the entire article about revitalizing Inglewood at The Architect’s Newspaper.
A slideshow of Inglewood’s Market Street after the jump.

A Worm in the Big Apple

East
Monday, October 25, 2010
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New York's ugly block of 35th Street (Google Maps)

New York’s ugly block of 35th Street (Google Maps)

It’s not all glitz in Midtown Manhattan.  One block of 35th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues was awarded the pernicious title of Midtown’s ugliest stretch on the appropriately named “Ugly Streets” walking tour, headed up last Friday by the Municipal Art Society‘s Frank Addeo.

But is there an upside to being ugly?

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