Towering Beacon Awaits Approval in Miami Beach

Other
Thursday, December 2, 2010
.
Tobias Rehberger's Lighthouse proposal for Miami (Courtesy Art Newspaper)

Tobias Rehberger's Lighthouse proposal for Miami (Courtesy Art Newspaper)

You won’t see German artist Tobias Rehberger‘s proposed Lighthouse installation at this year’s Art Basel exhibition in Miami Beach, but if the city approves the project next week, the towering beacon could be lighting up the night sky by the end of 2011.  To be located in South Pointe Park at a cost of $500,000, the 55-foot tall Lighthouse is comprised of stacked cylinders and would represent Rehberger’s first public commission in the United States. [ Via The Art Newspaper. ]

Architecture, the Final Frontier for Pirates?

International
Wednesday, December 1, 2010
.

 

(Slightly adjusted) Zaha Hadid Pavilion (Courtesy John Picken / flickr)

(Slightly adjusted) Zaha Hadid Pavilion (Courtesy John Picken / flickr)

 

Aye, those swashbucklin’ pirates are at it again, matey! This time, though, they’re not after gold, DVDs, or designer purses, but the identities of architects. The Guardian‘s Jonathan Glancey relates that Chinese firms posing as British officers of Aedas and Broadway Maylan have been pursuing bids with false information. He points out the dangers that such a development might entail for the profession and wonders if starchitects like Zaha Hadid could be the next victims.

Read More

New York Expands Pop-Up Cafe Program in 2011

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, November 30, 2010
.
Returning the street to pedestrians with pop-up cafe's (Courtesy RG Architecture)

Returning the street to pedestrians with pop-up cafe’s (Courtesy RG Architecture)

Could 2011 be the year of the pedestrian in New York? Under the guidance of DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, NYC sidewalks will continue their slow march into the street next year as the city launches a major expansion of its “pop-up café” pilot program across its five boroughs.

The first pop-up café tested out in Lower Manhattan this year proved successful enough that Sadik-Khan has expanded the program, planning for up to 12 sidewalk extensions.

And they’re good for business. Read more after the jump.

Tile of Spain Wants to Take You On Vacation

Other
Tuesday, November 30, 2010
.
Valencia, Spain (Photo courtesy Wikipedia)

Valencia, Spain (Photo courtesy Wikipedia)

Want a free trip to Europe? Tile of Spain has just the ticket, but you have to act fast.  The tile manufacturer is offering four architects and interior designers a chance to taste the local cuisine, see a few of the local sites, take in a tile trade show, and probably learn quite a bit about the offerings of Tile of Spain.  But hey, it’s a free trip right?  You just have to answer a few questions, but, hurry, the deadline’s tomorrow.

Contest rules and info after the jump.

Filed Under: 

Philly Considers Times Square′s Forbidden Fruit

East
Monday, November 29, 2010
.
Proposal for Philly's East Market Street (Courtesy Philly Daily News)

Proposal for Philly's East Market Street (Courtesy Philly Daily News)

Philly’s East Market Street could offer a small slice of Times Square’s neon nightlife if a proposed “commercial advertising district” makes it through City Council.  Developers and billboard proponents are betting that digital advertising signs will keep tourists shopping – and spending – downtown, but the Philadelphia Daily News says not everyone is going along for the ride.

More: If you build a billboard, will they come?

Filed Under: ,

A Thousand Drops of Light in Madison Square Park

East
Monday, November 29, 2010
.
Scattered Light installation by Jim Campbell (Photo by James Ewing courtesy Madison Square Park Conservancy)

Scattered Light installation by Jim Campbell (Photo by James Ewing courtesy Madison Square Park Conservancy)

Upon first stumbling across this massive array of 2,000 LED lights encased in standard light bulbs in Madison Square Park a few weeks ago, I thought holiday decoration had come a little early to the Flatiron’s front yard, but as shadowed figures began moving across the field of light, it became apparent that this installation by artist Jim Campbell was something special.

More info and a couple videos after the jump.

Urban Planning as a Psychoactive Drug

National
Wednesday, November 24, 2010
.
Manhattan and Central Park (Courtesy jmac1963 / flickr)

Manhattan and Central Park (Courtesy jmac1963 / flickr)

CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta points out a University of Michigan, Ann Arbor study suggesting that city dwellers harbor more stress than their suburban counterparts, but says access to parks could be the cure. Researchers have found that spending time in parks or park-like settings can help reduce cognitive effort and promote relaxation.

While that may seem obvious, check out the rest…

Models of Ruin Show Eerie States Of Abandonment

Other
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
.
After Effects model (Courtesy Daniele Del Nero)

After Effects model (Courtesy Daniele Del Nero)

The cult of decay is an enthralling topic.  This inevitability of time serves as the inspiration of Italian artist Daniele Del Nero‘s new project “After Effects” consisting of a series of model houses in advanced states of decay.  Del Nero covered the models in flour and mold which then grew to nearly consume the models.  These eerie miniatures appear strangely similar to plant-strewn ruins of many ailing rustbelt cities that have captivated public imagination as cities continue to wrestle with abandonment and revitalization. [ Via designboom. ]

Take a look at a few of the models after the jump.

Hudson Square Pushes to Reclaim Pedestrian Space

East, East Coast
Monday, November 22, 2010
.
Street scene in  Hudson Square (Courtesy Hudson Square Connection)

Street scene in Hudson Square (Courtesy Hudson Square Connection)

A major transformation of the once-industrial Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan aims to bring pedestrian vitality to streets originally designed for delivery trucks servicing printing houses.  Crain’s reports that Hudson Square Connections, the local business improvement district, has selected a design group led by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects from a pool of 23 respondents to create a new streetscape to improve the area’s image.

More on the plan to balance the area’s changing demographics.

Stay Up To Date with AN on Facebook and Twitter

Other
Monday, November 22, 2010
.

Can’t get enough architecture and design news?  Neither can we.  Now you can stay on the cutting edge of the latest industry news and insightful critique from The Architect’s Newspaper by liking us on Facebook or following us on Twitter?  It’s an easy way to stay informed and share stories from The Architect’s Newspaper with your friends.

You can also have clutter-free highlights from The Architect’s Newspaper delivered to your inbox every Monday morning.  We hand select the top news and blog stories along with upcoming events and competitions to help get your week started off right.  Sign up for our e-newsletter today!

Filed Under: ,

The Straw That Broke the Silver Towers' Back

East, East Coast
Friday, November 19, 2010
.
Fourth tower at NYU cancelled (Rendering courtesy Grimshaw and MVVA)

The proposed fourth tower at NYU is being reconsidered. (Rendering courtesy Grimshaw and MVVA)

I.M. Pei speaks and NYU listens. The university announced this week that plans for a Grimshaw-designed residential highrise planned for Pei’s landmarked Silver Towers block will be scrapped after the architect expressed disapproval over the project. The proposed 400-foot tower set amid three original concrete structures had been a point of conflict between NYU and its neighbors.

Read more after the jump.

Artist Creates Amazing Breathing Wall From Trash Bags

Other
Friday, November 19, 2010
.

One Hundred and Eight installation (Courtesy Nils Völker)

One Hundred and Eight installation (Courtesy Nils Völker)


Artist Nils Völker has created a breathing wall comprised of trash bags and cooling fans. One Hundred and Eight selectively inflates a grid of, you guessed it, 108 bags to create a strikingly simple yet poetic result.  The softness of the trash bags rising and falling is really something to see. The installation can also interact with the viewer, sensing a person’s presence before the wall.  From the artist:

Although each plastic bag is mounted stationary the sequences of inflation and deflation create the impression of lively and moving creatures which waft slowly around like a shoal. But as soon a viewer comes close it instantly reacts by drawing back and tentatively following the movements of the observer. As long as he remains in a certain area in front of the installation it dynamically reacts to the viewers motion. As soon it does no longer detect someone close it reorganizes itself after a while and gently restarts wobbling around.

Can you imagine this idea translated to the scale of architecture? Cloud-like hallways – or even full facades – might actively follow passers by with a gently inflating and deflating rhythm. [ Via Today and Tomorrow. ]

Watch the video after the jump.

Page 24 of 27« First...10...2223242526...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License