Series to Examine the Future of American Design

East
Monday, January 10, 2011
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The Raw Clock by Stanley Ruiz (Courtesy MAD)

The Raw Clock by Stanley Ruiz (Courtesy MAD)

Dan Rubinstein, editor-in-chief of Surface magazine, is curating a series of lectures at the Museum of Arts and Design evaluating the future of American furniture design. Dubbed “The Home Front: American Furniture Now,” the five-lecture series begins this Thursday, January 13 as leading furniture retailers present their views on the difficulty selling American design. In March, AN‘s own executive editor Julie Iovine will lead a roundtable panel called “Drafted” on the importance of American design for architects and designers.

More info on the series after the jump.

Video> Fly Through the New Broad Museum

West
Friday, January 7, 2011
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Public lobby at The Broad (Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

Public lobby at The Broad (Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

Yesterday, Sam Lubell detailed The Broad Foundation’s much-anticipated LA museum complete with all the renderings. Now, we have a video fly-through of the new Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed space and isn’t it something! You can really start to appreciate the porous nature of The Broad‘s structural concrete “veil” and the views inside and out it will offer. You also gain a sense of its street presence sitting alongside Frank Gehry’s Disney Hall, which appears rather large in comparison. What do you think?

Watch the fly-through animation after the jump!

Pruitt-Igoe Documentary Debuts In February

Midwest
Thursday, January 6, 2011
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A still of the Pruitt-Igoe demolition from the new documentary (Courtesy Pruitt-Igoe Myth)

A still of the Pruitt-Igoe demolition from the new documentary (Courtesy Pruitt-Igoe Myth)

A new documentary called The Pruitt-Igoe Myth by Chad Friedrichs seeks to capture the life of St. Louis’ infamous housing project through the lens of the people who lived there. The film looks beyond the iconic images of its implosion and offers an analysis of urban renewal’s impact locally and across the nation. From the movie’s web site:

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home.

At the film’s historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries.

The 83-minute film will be premiering February 11-13 at the Oxford Film Festival in Mississippi. No word yet when it will make it to St. Louis and beyond, but we’re anxiously awaiting! [Via Preservation Research Office ]

Watch the movie trailer after the jump.

MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

International
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it’s teaming up with Rome’s National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum.
Read more: Officials hope for a local feel as finalists are announced.

Pictorial> Architects Propose Rolling Hotel in Norway

International
Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Swedish architects Jagnefalt Milton have proposed architectural locomotion for Åndalsnes, a town in Norway. A series of buildings would be built atop existing rail tracks in the city and could house various uses ranging from a rolling hotel to a rolling concert hall to a rolling public bath.

Get rolling on to the photos after the jump!

Filed Under: 

The Green Building′s Platinum Lining

Midwest
Monday, December 20, 2010
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An interior view of The Green Building’s street-facing café. (Ted Wathen/Quadrant)

An interior view of The Green Building’s street-facing café. (Ted Wathen/Quadrant)

Since opening in 2008, The Green Building in Louisville, Kentucky has been quietly awaiting the verdict on just how sustainable the three-story adaptive reuse project really is. As expected, the 115-year-old former dry goods store designed by California-based (fer) studio announced that the project received LEED Platinum certification, becoming the city’s first Platinum building.

Find out just how green platinum can be and see a slideshow after the jump!

Robert Ivy Leaving Architectural Record to Head AIA

National
Thursday, December 16, 2010
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Robert Ivy, FAIA will assume leadership of AIA National (Courtesy Architectural Record)

Robert Ivy, FAIA will assume leadership of AIA National (Courtesy Architectural Record)

Robert Ivy, FAIA, is preparing to step down as Editor-in-Chief of Architectural Record to become Executive Vice President and CEO of the American Institute of Architects in Washington, D.C.

Ivy presided over Record during a time of change, establishing the magazine as the official publication of the AIA between 1997 and 2010. Next year, Architect magazine will assume the same role.

“Being editor of Architectural Record fulfilled a lifelong ambition,” Ivy said in a release. “I was privileged to serve as a steward for the publication during a fascinating time, from the challenges of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina to the digital transformation of architecture and even of publishing.”

On February 1, Ivy will succeed former AIA chief Christine McEntee who stepped down in July to assume leadership of the American Geophysical Union.

Architectural Record is celebrating its 120th anniversary in 2011.

Quick Clicks: Failing Schools, Hangover, Beekman Boos, Grand Piano

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Renzo Piano's London Shard (Courtesy Sellar Property Group)

Renzo Piano's London Shard (Courtesy Sellar Property Group)

Failing schools. Fast Company isn’t pulling any punches with a title like “American Design Schools are a Mess, and Produce Weak Graduates.” Designer Gadi Amit laments in his lengthy critique, “I’m finding that the impressive academic credentials of most students don’t add up to the basic skills I require in a junior designer. Simply put, the design education system today is failing many aspiring young students.” [ Fast Company ]

Hangover. It’s difficult to imagine how such a thing could happen, but an architect working for the US government in Japan managed to rack up a tab of $36,890 at a Tokyo bar. (If you’re curious, that’s 3,011 shots!) The bill is the result of a drum-based bar-competition, and architect Kaz Miura now holds a title previously held by bankers and movie stars. [ The Australian via UnBeige ]

Booing Beekman. James Gardner delivers a scathing review of Frank Gehry’s yet-to-be-completed 8 Sprice Street née Beekman Tower in Lower Manhattan. Opening with a question, Gardner asks why the tower is “so thoroughly sad and unimpressive.” Ouch. And it doesn’t get much better further in. At the root of it, the problem seems to be that the tower is rather conventional despite its curvaceous titanium skin. [ The Real Deal ]

Grand Piano. Renzo Piano’s London skyscraper dubbed the Shard (rendered at top) has topped out, or at least its central concrete core. Standing over 1,000 feet tall, the Shard will be the tallest tower in the UK and the tallest commercial tower in Europe. (And, if you recall, Renzo Piano is pretty tall himself.) Construction started in early 2009 and the tower is expected to be complete by the summer of 2012. [ BD Online ]

Filed Under: 

Daily Clicks: Top Ten, Exhibitionist, Streetcars, Saving Trees

Daily Clicks
Friday, December 10, 2010
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Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

We’re starting up a new regular feature here on the AN Blog we’re tentatively calling Daily Clicks. For your perusal, a quick selection of architecture and design stories from around the web.

The year’s best. The Chicago Tribune‘s Blair Kamin looks beyond the doom and gloom that was 2010 to find the top ten architectural bright spots. Among his picks? The opening of the Burj Khalifa and a pollution-eating park in Chicago, and [ City Scapes ]

Cincy Streetcar. Cincinnati is one step closer to a new streetcar system, after the Ohio Department of Transportation unanimously recommended $35 million for construction of the system’s first phase, which is expected to open in 2013. [ Urban Cincy ]

Don’t hit print! A new file format, the WWF (after the World Wildlife Fund, of course), aims at saving a few trees as we send around PDFs through e.mail. If you’d like to prohibit your PDFs from being printed, there’s a free software download. [ Core 77 ]

Office Exhibitionism. Artist Stephan Sagmeister has a new web site. Now, you can sit and stare at a live feed from a web cam inside his New York studio to make sure everyone’s working. On this late Friday afternoon, orange balloons were strewn across the floor, leaving us regretting we’d missed the party.  [ Creative Review ]

    Filed Under: 

    So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright

    Other
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Not many architects can boast being the subject of a pop song, but, then again, Frank Lloyd Wright was always something special. Back in 1969, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel eulogized the architect in the eponymous “So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright,” appearing on their Bridge Over Troubled Water album. Garfunkel took an interest in Wright while studying architecture at Columbia and later challenged Simon to write the song while living in California.

    While some argue that the song is really a cryptic breakup poem between the two singers on the verge of splitting, I’m sticking with architecture going mainstream. As the song says, “Architects may come and/Architects may go and/Never change your point of view./ When I run dry/I stop awhile and think of you.”

    Hear the song after the jump.

    Filed Under: 

    Pictorial: Le Monolithe by MVRDV

    International
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

    Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

    MVRDV just completed “Le Monolithe,” a mixed-use project in Lyon, France featuring social housing, apartments, disabled residences, offices, and retail organized along a central exterior axis of courtyards. The 350,000 square foot structure overlooks the confluence of the Rhône and Saône rivers and represents a collaboration of several architects and landscape architects.

    Take a look at the project after the jump.

    Swamps Emerging on the Urban Landscape

    Midwest
    Thursday, December 2, 2010
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    An urban swamp in Detroit (Photo by Clark Mizono)`

    An urban swamp in Detroit (Photo by Clark Mizono)

    While bringing nature back into the city is generally heralded as a sign of improvement, this is hardly the best path to that end.  Next American City‘s Willy Staley recently took a walk through Detroit‘s East Side with vacant property guru Sam Butler to surmise the problems of abandonment facing the city. Detroit, seeking to demolish some 3,000 structures, has long been at the center of a movement to “shrink” cities suffering from population loss and blight.

    More on urban swamps bogging down neighborhood revitalization.

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