The Energetic City: Design Trust Calls on Designers to Create Connected Public Space

The Energetic City. (Courtesy Deutsch NY)

The Energetic City. (Courtesy Deutsch NY)

On Monday, dozens of designers, planners, and community organizers packed the amphitheater at the newly opened LEESER-designed BRIC House in Brooklyn‘s rapidly-growing BAM district. The attendees were there to hear the details of the latest Request For Proposals (RFP) from the Design Trust for Public Space, The Energetic City: Connectivity in the Public Realm.

The Design Trust has launched pivotal projects before, like their Five Borough Farm that is helping to redefine urban agriculture in New York City. This time, the group is seeking new ideas for public space and, according to a statement, “develop new forms of connectivity among the diverse people, systems, and built, natural, and digital environments of New York City.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Architectural League Names 2014 Emerging Voices

East, International
Thursday, February 6, 2014
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House in Frogs Hollow by Williamson Chong Architects. (Bob Gundu)

House in Frogs Hollow by Williamson Chong Architects. (Bob Gundu)

Today, the Architectural League of New York revealed its selections for the 2014 class of Emerging Voices, a distinction that honors young firms “with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism.” This year’s pool of winners demonstrated an entrepreneurial spirit, according to the League, “pursuing alternate forms of practice, often writing their own programs or serving as their own clients.” Winners are selected by a jury from a pool of invited firms.

This year’s international group of eight includes The Living (which just this week was also named winner of MoMA PS 1’s Young Architects Program), Surfacedesign, SITU Studio, Ants of the Prairie, Estudio Macías Peredo, Rael San Fratello, TALLER |MauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrillo|, and Williamson Chong Architects. A lecture series is planned in March where each firm will present their work and design philosophy.

More information about the winners after the jump.

Before & After> 25 of New York City’s Most Transformative Road Diets

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New York City has been adjusting to its new Mayor Bill De Blasio, who took office at the beginning of the year. The new mayor has been slowly revealing his team of commissioners who will guide the city’s continued transformation. As AN has noted many times before, De Blasio’s predecessor Michael Bloomberg and his team already left a giant mark on New York’s built environment.

With little more than paint, planters, and a few well-placed boulders, Bloomberg and former Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan‘s street interventions have been some of the most evident changes around the city. Whether it’s at Brooklyn’s Grand Army Plaza, above, or at Snøhetta’s redesigned Times Square, these road diets shaved off excess space previously turned over to cars and returned it to the pedestrian realm in dramatic fashion as these before-and-after views demonstrate.

As we continue to learn more about our new Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg, take a look back at 25 of the most exciting road diets and pedestrian plaza conversions across New York City from the Bloomberg era.

See more transformations after the jump.

Pictorial> First Segment of Santiago Calatrava’s New York City Transit Hub Opens

East, Newsletter, Pictorial
Thursday, October 31, 2013
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(Branden Klayko / AN)

(Branden Klayko / AN)

Above ground, Santiago Calatrava‘s bird-like transit hub at the World Trade Center is just beginning to take flight, but underground, the first section of the project is already soaring. Officials cut the ribbon on Calatrava’s West Concourse tunnel connecting the World Trade PATH Station and Brookfield Place (formerly the World Financial Center). Comprised of sculptural steel ribs set against pristine, highly-polished white marble, the new space makes taking transit feel almost like a religious experience.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Finalists Announced for Next Figment Pavilion on Governors Island

East, Newsletter
Thursday, September 19, 2013
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One of the finalists, ArtCloud. (Courtesy Figment)

One of the finalists, ArtCloud. (Courtesy Figment)

Take a ferry over to Governors Island in New York Harbor before September 22 and you’ll stumble across a massive white cloud made up of thousands of reused milk jugs. Venture inside that cloud, and you’ll be mesmerized by thousands more plastic soda bottles partially filled with blue liquid that creates an otherworldly gradient of filtered light overhead. The so-called Head in the Clouds pavilion, plopped in a grassy field on the island, is part of the annual FIGMENT festival, a celebration of arts and culture that brings a series of imaginative installations, including an unorthodox miniature golf course.

In partnership with AIANY’s Emerging New York Architect (ENYA) committee and the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the “City of Dreams” competition selects a pavilion designed by a young designer or practice to be built the following summer, and this year’s shortlist has just been announced.

Previous winners include 2010’s Living Pavilion by Ann HaBurple Bup in 2011 by Bittertang, and this year’s Head in the Clouds pavilion by Brooklyn-based Studio Klimoski Chang Architects. A winner will be selected by October 31, 2013.

View the finalists after the jump.

Pictorial> Bjarke Ingels’ Mantaray Will Soar Over Brooklyn Bridge Park

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

Bjarke Ingels and Michael Van Valkenburgh are teaming up to design Pier 6 at the southern end of Brooklyn Bridge Park. As AN reported, the pier will feature a pastoral landscape terminated by a triangular viewing pavilion called the Mantaray. The landscape and viewing platform will offer unmatched views of the Manhattan skyline and accommodate special events like concerts. Take a look at the gallery of renderings below or read more about the project here.

View the gallery after the jump.

Comcast Expansion Could Bring Norman Foster to Downtown Philly

East
Friday, September 13, 2013
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(Courtesy Bing Maps)

(Courtesy Bing Maps)

Norman Foster is expected to design a new skyscraper in downtown Philadelphia, according to sources cited by the Philly Inquirer. Media company Comcast has outgrown its current home in the city’s tallest building—Robert A.M. Stern‘s 975-foot-tall Comcast Center. Details of the planned tower are being guarded, but architecture critic Inga Saffron reported that Comcast is exploring plans to build a “vertical campus” including several new towers, potentially beginning with a new structure on a 1.5-acre vacant lot at the corner of 18th and Arch streets (indicated above). The site was previously approved for a 1,500-foot-tall tower in 2008 but Saffron said the new tower would likely be shorter. Developer John Gattuso of Liberty Property Trust told the Inquirer, “The tower will be as big as it needs to be.”

Pictorial> Tribute in Light Shines Bright Over Lower Manhattan

East
Thursday, September 12, 2013
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(Branden Klayko / AN)

(Branden Klayko / AN)

As dusk shrouded Lower Manhattan in darkness last night, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum extended an 88-cannon salute to those whose lives were indelibly-changed by the events of September 11, 2001. Now in its 12th year, the Tribute in Light sent two high-intensity beams of light four miles up into the night sky in a poignant memorial marking the absence of the original Twin Towers. Several dozen onlookers including victims’ family members and city officials watched the beams emanate from the top of a parking structure just blocks from Ground Zero in a solemn expression of remembrance.

Continue reading after the jump.

On September 11, Reflecting On Progress After 12 Years

East, National
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
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The World Trade Center site on September 11, 2013. (Branden Klayko / AN)

The World Trade Center site on September 11, 2013. (Branden Klayko / AN)

The streets of Lower Manhattan were especially crowded today as New Yorkers and tourists alike gathered around the World Trade Center site to mark the 12th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. A national moment of silence was observed at 8:45 a.m. this morning—the time the first jet struck the World Trade Center—to reflect on the disaster and all who were touched by the devastation. Over a decade after the attacks, Lower Manhattan is in the midst of a strong recovery. With AN‘s offices only a couple blocks away from the World Trade Center site, we have been able to watch daily as construction continues at rapid speed.

More after the jump.

Three Finalists Reveal Designs for an Activated Van Alen Institute

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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Proposal by Of Possible Architectures.

Proposal by Of Possible Architectures.

New York City’s Van Alen Institute (VAI) is turning 120 next year, and to celebrate, the institute is taking its message of inspired architecture and urbanism to the street. The storefront space on West 22nd Street has been home to the institute’s popular LOT-EK–designed bookstore and event space, organized around a stack of bleachers made from reclaimed wooden doors painted highlighter yellow. VAI’s new director, David van der Leer, is tackling the redesign and expansion of the sidewalk space to maximize the organization’s public visibility as it evolves its mission into the 21st century.

Three finalists—Collective-LOK, EFGH Architectural Design Studio, and Of Possible Architectures (OPA)—were selected from over 120 respondents to VAI’s “Ground/Work” competition earlier this year, and now their schemes have been revealed.

View the finalists’ proposals after the jump.

Pisa Going Plumb? Leaning Tower—Very Slowly—Straightening Up Its Act

International, Newsletter
Friday, August 16, 2013
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Leaning Tower of Pisa. (Eric Meyer / Flickr)

Leaning Tower of Pisa. (Eric Meyer / Flickr)

The Torre di Pisa is straightening up its act, according to scientists who monitor the famous tower’s tilt. There’s no need to worry, though, the Tower of Pisa won’t be standing completely vertical any time soon. The Huffington Post reported this week that the tower has shifted about an inch (2.5 cm) back toward being upright since 2001, when the structure was reopened to the public.

This gravity-defying maneuver was brought about by a restoration to the tower’s foundation that began in 1992 when the building’s foundation were secured, moving the entire structure a whopping 15 feet. Structural interventions included temporarily installing steel cables as an emergency measure followed by excavating stones beneath the tower and replacing them with steel and concrete. The overall effect, according to HuffPo, was to sink the tower slightly into the ground and thereby make it more vertical. Scientists said these restorative measures will make the Leaning Tower safe for two- to three-centuries.

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Zoë Ryan to Curate 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial.  Zoë Ryan to Curate 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial Zoë Ryan, curator of architecture and design at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been selected to curate the second Istanbul Design Biennial, taking place from October 18 through December 14, 2014. Read AN’s report from the previous Istanbul Design Biennial here. Ryan has been working to expand the Art Institute’s architecture and design holdings and teaches at the School of the Art Institute and at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Previously, she worked at New York’s Van Alen Institute and the Museum of Modern Art. (Photo: Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

 

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