Spectacular Recognition! Jimenez Lai Wins BPC Debut Award at the Lisbon Triennale

International, Midwest
Friday, September 13, 2013
.

jiminez-lai-lisbon-winner-01

Chicago-based architect Jimenez Lai, principal of Bureau Spectacular, has been awarded the first BPC Debut Award for architects under 35. Lai is known for his bold, formally-inventive work, which he describes as “cartoon narratives” that “swerve into the physical world through architectural installations models, and small buildings.” He is the author of Citizen of No Place and an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Selected from a pool of more than 180 entrants, Lai’s work was recognized for its “original design thinking and pursuit of critical ideas.” The prize comes with a modest monetary award of 5,000 euros.

Coffee + Giacometti: MoMA Sculpture Garden Offering Free Morning Access

East
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
.
The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at MoMA. (Martin Seck)

The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at MoMA. (Martin Seck)

MoMA’s renowned Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden will be open and free to the public from 9:00 to 10:15 am, beginning September 9. Designed by Philip Johnson—and preserved during the recent Yoshio Taniguchi expansion—the sculpture garden is one of the great modern landscapes in the U.S., and currently features sculpture by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Alberto Giacometti, Tony Smith, and others. With coffee and beverages available for purchase, the garden is sure to become a destination for quick business meetings and quiet moments of cultural immersion amid the hubbub of Midtown mornings.

Urban Planner Named New President of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
.
Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

Aerial view of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Courtesy Brooklyn Navy Yard)

David Ehrenberg has been appointed president and CEO of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a 300-acre, former ship-building base turned city-owned industrial park. Ehrenberg is currently an executive vice president at the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). Over the last decade the Navy Yard has emerged as an essential zone for preserving and growing New York’s manufacturing sector, especially small businesses. The Yard currently includes 4.5 million square feet of leasable space, with an occupancy rate of 99 percent.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Todd Oldham and Designtex Revive the Wildlife Delights of Charley Harper

National, Newsletter
Monday, August 19, 2013
.
Todd Oldham (left) and the "Ladybugs" wallcovering pattern (right). (Courtesy Designtex)

Todd Oldham (left) and the “Ladybugs” wallcovering pattern (right). (Courtesy Designtex)

At the NeoCon contract furnishings trade show in June, AN executive editor Alan G. Brake sat down with Todd Oldham to discuss the collection of wall coverings he developed for Designtex adapting the work of Charley Harper. Harper is arguably best known as an illustrator, but Oldham is working with the Charley Harper Studio to broaden Harper’s reputation and create new products using his menagerie of images of flora and fauna. A versatile designer of fashion, home furnishings, books, and objects, Oldham has a special interest in reviving midcentury designers and he previously worked with the Alexander Girard archive.

AN: Tell us about your interest in Charley Harper.

Todd Oldham: I had the great pleasure of knowing Mr. Harper for the last five years of his life. He was an amazing, magical man. I came to know his work when I was a kid. He did the illustrations for a book called the Golden Book of Biology, which was my biology text book in school.  I loved it. So many years later  I reconnected things and found him and forced my way in—he was very gracious about it

Continue reading after the jump.

NYC Department of Design and Construction Launches Program to Support Local Designers

East
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
.
BRpJdeECYAEiG3K

NYC City Council Speaker Christine Quinn with Council member Margaret Chin and DDC Commissioner David Burney (Photo: Emily Hooper/AN)

Last May New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced a new initiative, NYC X Design, to promote New York’s design community, an economic sector that includes more than 40,000 designers of various disciplines, according to official figures. As an outgrowth of NYC X Design, today the Department of Design and Construction (DDC) launched a new pilot project called Built/NYC, which provides $400,000 in capital funding for custom furniture, lighting, or textile designs in up to 20 city building projects. Council Speaker Quinn’s office provided the funding for the project, and at a press conference today held at the NoHo design store, The Future Perfect, Speaker Quinn argued that the initiative would support both local designers and local manufacturers and help maintain a diverse economy. Interested designers can respond to an new RFQ, which would place them on a pre-qualified list to be considered for custom pieces for projects like new libraries, community centers, or fire houses (architects for the building projects sit on the selection committee).  Read More

Ten Teams Shortlisted for HUD’s Rebuild by Design Competition

National
Friday, August 9, 2013
.
(David Sundberg/ESTO)

(David Sundberg/ESTO)

In response to Hurricane Sandy, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) launched the Rebuild by Design competition to develop strategies to increase the resiliency of urban and coastal areas in the face of extreme weather events and climate change. According to HUD’s website, the goal of the competition is “to promote innovation by developing regionally-scalable but locally-contextual solutions that increase resilience in the region, and to implement selected proposals with both public and private funding dedicated to this effort. The competition also represents a policy innovation by committing to set aside HUD Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding specifically to incentivize implementation of winning projects and proposals. Examples of design solutions are expected to range in scope and scale—from large-scale green infrastructure to small-scale residential resiliency retrofits.”

The shortlist of 10 teams—including architects, landscape architects, university groups, developers, engineers and others—has been announced.

View the shortlisted teams after the jump. .

After a Decade, Paul Gunther To Bid Adieu To the Classicists

National, Shft+Alt+Del
Tuesday, August 6, 2013
.
Paul Gunther. (Courtesy ICAA)

Paul Gunther. (Courtesy ICAA)

After a decade at the helm, Paul Gunther is stepping down as the president of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA). Under Gunther’s leadership the ICAA expanded to include 15 national chapters, and grew into a 14 person organization. In addition to holding lectures and symposia throughout the year, the Institute publishes the journal The Classicist, and it awards a summer fellowship for landscape painting. Last year the Institute held a provocative symposium reexamining postmodernism’s relationship to classicism, which drew a wide audience including senior members of the architectural community who rose to prominence in the pomo heyday of the 1980s as well as young designers drawn to the playful iconography of the period.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bergdoll Stepping Down as A+D Chair at MoMA, Returning to Columbia

East
Wednesday, July 31, 2013
.

bergdollbarry_portraitII

Barry Bergdoll is stepping down as Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, a position he has held since 2007. He will return to teaching at Columbia University and will take up an endowed chair in the Department of Art History and Archaeology. He will stay on part-time at MoMA to continue working on a major exhibition on Latin American architecture currently scheduled for 2015. He will also advise on the use and development of the Frank Lloyd Wright archive, which is jointly owned by Columbia and MoMA.

While at the Modern, Bergdoll has curated a wide variety of shows, addressing topics ranging from prefabricated housing to the Bauhaus to rising sea levels. His recent exhibitions have included a widely praised show on the french architect Henri LaBrouste, and Le Courbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes (co-curated with Jean-Louis Cohen), which is currently on view.

Bergdoll’s tenure as chair has been marked both by a deepening of the historical and scholarly quality of the exhibitions and programming as well as greater engagement with social issues, such as affordable housing and climate change. In an email to AN, Bergdoll wrote, “I look forward to…continuing to be associated not only with the world’s oldest curatorial department of architecture and design, but I think its most vibrant and finest.”

MoMA will begin a search for his successor at the end of August.

Pritzker to Denise Scott Brown: No Prize For You, Not Yet At Least (Updated)

International
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
.

Denise-Scott-Brown-Las-Vegas-1972-www.glamcult.com_

Robert Venturi won the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1991. His wife and professional collaborator Denise Scott Brown was not recognized, sparking a controversy that has raged ever since. Following a recent round of petitions and editorials calling for a retroactive prize–or some form of recognition—the current Pritzker jury chair, Lord Peter Palumbo, sent a letter on the matter to two current students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Arielle Assouline-Lichten and Caroline James, organizers of the most prominent of the recent petitions.

Palumbo made it clear that no retroactive prize was possible: “Insofar as you have in mind a retroactive award of the prize to Ms. Scott Brown, the present jury cannot do so. Pritzker juries, over time, are made up of different individuals, each of whom does his or her best to find the most highly qualified candidate.” Palumbo left open the possibility of recognition for Scott Brown. “Let us assure you, however, that Ms. Scott Brown remains eligible for the Pritzker Award. That award is given on the basis of an architect’s total body of built work.” Palumbo further acknowledged the context of the controversy: “We should like to thank you for calling directly to our attention a more general problem, namely that assuring women and fair and equal place in the profession.”

Real Lord Palumbo’s Letter in Full.

AIA Billings Dip Into Negative Territory For First Time in Nine Months

National
Wednesday, May 22, 2013
.
BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

Underscoring the fragility of the economic recovery, the April AIA’s Architecture Billings Index dipped into negative territory for the first time in nine months. The slump to 48.6 was significant, down from 51.9 in March (any score above 50 indicates positive growth).

“Project approval delays are having an adverse effect on the design and construction industry, but again and again we are hearing that it is extremely difficult to obtain financing to move forward on real estate projects,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, in a statement. “There are other challenges that have prevented a broader recovery that we will examine in the coming months if this negative trajectory continues. However, given that inquiries for new projects continue to be strong, we’re hopeful that this is just a short-term dip.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Ten Years in the Making, WSP Consolidates

East
Friday, April 26, 2013
.
Construction of 3 World Trade in January. (Joe Woolhead)

Construction of 3 World Trade in January. (Joe Woolhead)

Mergers and consolidations continue in the A/E/C industry. The four legacy firms that make up the US division of engineering firm WSP—WSP Flack + Kurtz, WSP Cantor Seinuk, WSP Environmental & Energy, and WSP SELLS—are consolidating under the WSP name.

Read More

Filed Under: 

A Surprise Design Wedding: Herman Miller Acquires Maharam

National
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
.
Palio by Alexander Girard, 1964. (Courtesy Maharam)

Palio by Alexander Girard, 1964. (Courtesy Maharam)

Herman Miller is acquiring the renowned textile firm, Maharam, bringing together two of America’s most design-centric companies. Founded in 1902 in New York, Maharam has gained a reputation in recent decades for commissioning textile designs by leading contemporary designers like Hella Jongerius, Tord Boontje, and Paul Smith, and reissuing classic designs by Verner Panton, Gio Ponti, Alexander Girard, and many others. Led by Michael and Stephen Maraham, the company has cultivated a strong connection to the design community and developed products guided by the taste and vision of the brothers. According to a release by Herman Miller, both Maharam brothers will stay involved in the company for at least the next two years. Senior executives with the company will also stay in place.

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Page 2 of 2512345...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License