SOM Unveils Second Station for Florida’s Commuter Rail System

All Aboard Florida's Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

All Aboard Florida’s Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

In May, SOM released renderings for Miami Station—a 1,000-foot-long, multimodal transit hub that would anchor the Sunshine State’s impending high-speed commuter rail system known as All Aboard Florida. The firm floated the station 50 feet atop reinforced concrete trusses to allow for restaurants and retail, and an uninterrupted street grid. Now, with the Miami station getting underway, SOM has unveiled plans for the system’s Ft. Lauderdale station, and it appears that a design trend is emerging down in Florida.

All Aboard Florida's Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

All Aboard Florida’s Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

At first glance, the 27,500-square-foot station, designed by SOM and  Zyscovich Architects is just a smaller version of the first go-round in Miami as it is similarly defined by concrete trusses and lifted above grade. It is primarily comprised of stacked glass boxes that rise over the street and connect the ticketing lobby to the departures area. “Given the large scale of the All Aboard Florida project, creating a sense of overall unity for the entire transportation network – while conveying a sense of identity for each individual station – is one of the primary design goals,” said SOM in a statement. “The design of the Fort Lauderdale station achieves this balance by incorporating the lightness and transparency that characterizes the Miami terminal, while taking advantage of its unique site to create a distinctive landmark for the port city.

Its design—lightweight and luminous—both responds to its setting and creates a striking infrastructural icon for the city,” said Roger Duffy, a design partner at SOM, in a statement. This is essentially the same way Duffy described Miami Station when AN sat down with him in June. If it ain’t broke…

SOM and  Zyscovich are also designing All Aboard Florida’s stations in Orlando and West Palm Beach, but no word yet on what a design for those stations might look like, or if trusses are slatted for those cities as well.

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