Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas

International
Friday, August 27, 2010
.

Rem Koolhaas, winner of this year's Golden Lion, at the Arsenale. (Bill Menking)

Nothing much to report from yesterday, as it was a day of formal openings when very little was in fact open to the press or public. It was mostly a day of introductory speeches by biennale directors and city and government officials. Frank Gehry presented some models, made a few brief remarks, and then everyone headed for the hallway, where we had our first free prosecco and great little appetizers. Journalists and media types stood around asking about where the best parties were to be had in the coming days (more on this later).

Do Ho Suh's "Blueprint," the facade of a Venetian palazzo cast surprisingly well in blue fabric, hangs from the ceiling. (Bill Menking)

Today—after two days of too many speeches and press conferences—the biennale finally opened the doors of both the Arsenale and the national pavilions in the giardini, and everyone had their first chance to officially see if people really do meet in architecture. I ran through the projects installed in the Arsenale and in the afternoon the Italian pavilion in the giardini, which is of course not the Italian pavilion but simply a large exhibition space. The gigantic Arsenale has only 15 installations this year, giving each vast amounts of space in which to confront visitors. Most are therefore huge installations and are really engaged in design pyrotechnics more than displays of building models. They are architecture, but in what is fast becoming a kind of biennale style, halfway between design and art.

Junya.Ishigami's Architecture as Air: Study for Chateau La Coste—before it was torn down by a cat. (Courtesy Contessanally)

These include a 3-D film by Wim Wenders of SANAA’s Rolex Center and a smoke-filled cloud room with a long spiral ramp that is a pale replica of Diller and Scofidio’s Blur Building from 2002. Another space titled Architecture as Air: Study for Chateau La Coste by the architect Junya Ishigami is constructed from a field of thin monofilament pieces precisely arrayed across the space like a barely visible Fred Sandback string sculpture. Ishigami’s piece is indecipherable and most visitors simply pass through, but I was told by some young workers that it was meant to be a self-supporting line house until a cat ran through last night and it came crashing down.

Looking into Eric Owen Moss' installation at the Austrian Pavilion, which he curated. (Bill Menking)

Can this be true? Anyway, it’s a good story. Like what happened yesterday to Aaron Betsky, who curated the biennale in 2008. He was turned back at the door because he did not have the right credentials. When he protested that he had been the curator two years ago, an official replied: “So what are you doing at the biennale this year?”

Aldo Cibic lampoons utopianism by jamming it all onto one diorama. (Bill Menking)

In the afternoon, I saw the Italian pavilion, which Italian curator Luca Molinari has filled with a more diverse body of work than displayed in the Arsenale, ranging from installation projects to artworks and models. It’s hard in a quick blog post to summarize the work in this enormous pavilion without flattening out the diversity here or reverting to clichés. It deserves more thought and attention and individual consideration and that’s what I will try and do in an upcoming post.

Part of muf's British pavilion. The theater reminds us of one you might find at an old medical college. (Courtesy AJ)

But if there is a theme in the Italian pavilion, it is that more than a few critique or try to update the notion of utopia either in its early idealization—or the more recent consideration of it as not a model worth considering. There is Tom Sachs’ installation of slightly torn paper Corbusian prototypes on the one side, and Aldo Cibic’s wonderful small-scale utopian landscape of idealized building types, from high-design, high-density housing to bland suburban cul de sacs. In between these are all sorts of architectural thoughts, but none more thoughtful than Rem Koolhaas and a history of his Office for Metropolitan Architecture, a tribute to his winning this year’s Golden Lion.

Tom Sachs does Corbu's Unite d'Habitation. (Bill Menking)

I did have a chance to check out the British pavilion and see its wonderful muf-designed wooden “medical school” theater and miniature Venetian estuary complete with crabs and snails. Both show the advantage of having designers of muf’s ability curating an exhibition. Finally, the Ryue Nishizawa-curated Japanese pavilion is also rethinking utopia, in this case a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Metabolist movement. It brings back the movement but argues in fact that the city is organic and, as Aaron Levy claims, “beyond politics.”

Michael Meredith of MOS architects talks inside RaumlaborBerlin's balloon, a space set up by the radical urbanist group to host happenings all over Venice. (Bill Menking)

Now for the important stuff: The best party so far was the Audi Urban Futures event at the fabulous and long-vacant Misericordia space, which a Venetian friend used as a basketball court when she was a child. The highlight of the party was the announcement that the Future Award (worth 100,000 euros) was won by Jurgen Mayer H., an architect of great design talent who is now beginning to emerge as an international force.

Craig Hodgetts has proposed inside the Austrian pavilion a garbage truck that will suck up detritus and turn it into houses, like this one, that pop out the back. (Bill Menking)

With the biennale finally underway, I’m beginning to wonder if Sejima is right, and people meet in architecture, or, as Italian critic Luigi Prestinenza Pugliese says, does this show prove that “architects don’t really like people?”

5 Responses to “Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas”

  1. [...] Architecture Biennale | Welcome to Venice NYT >Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas archpaper.com >Venice: Golden Lion [...]

  2. Martin says:

    Think you messed up the two italian pavilions — the one at giardini which you refer to is Sejima’s show, the main Italian exhibition AILATI (at the Arsenale, way to the back) is curated by Molinari.

  3. Bill says:

    Martin,

    yes your correct as I still use the old designation for the building in the giardini. I agree I should get with it…

  4. [...] giapponese Junya Ishigami era ancora lì, il momento saliente della premiazione che è stato poi, come abbiamo riferito, buttato giù da un gatto scatenato la notte prima dell’apertura. Ora, mentre si cammina [...]

  5. [...] DON’T REALLY LIKE PEOPLE?”• Architect’s Newspaper | 27 agosto 2010 | • Vai all’articoloI PADIGLIONIIN ITALIA L’ARCHITETTURA C’È• Il Sole 24Ore | 27 agosto 2010 | [...]

Post new comment

Name (required)

E-Mail (required)

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License
Pinterest