Joseph Eichler’s Mid-Century Homes Reborn in Palm Springs

Realtor Monique Lombardelli purchased the rights to 65 original Joseph Eichler plans. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

Realtor Monique Lombardelli purchased the rights to 65 original Joseph Eichler plans. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

A few years ago, Realtor Monique Lombardelli fell in love with the work of Joseph Eichler, the developer whose architect-designed tract homes proliferated throughout Northern and Southern California in the decades following World War II. “[The Eichler homes] provide such a great environment, more of a relaxing, open feel,” she said. Lombardelli’s passion led her to produce a documentary on Eichler’s legacy, which in turn piqued her clients’ interest. “I started getting a lot of clients who wanted one, and there wasn’t anything to show them,” said Lombardelli. “Then I sold one that was a remodel, and everyone said, ‘I want an Eichler.’”

The homes remain popular with mid-century modern enthusiasts. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

The homes remain popular with mid-century modern enthusiasts. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

Lombardelli wondered: was it possible to build new, Eichler-inspired homes based on the developer’s original plans? She describes the process of uncovering the plans as a “treasure hunt” during which she felt like Sherlock Holmes—following evidence from one archive to the next, trying to convince the archivists that her project was worthwhile. “It’s funny because all the people at these different archives, they said, ‘These plans, most of them have been thrown out, nobody cares. Why do you want them?’” recalled Lombardelli. She eventually found luck at the archives at UC Berkeley and Stantec. “Stantec has everything, it was a mecca, a nirvana for Eichler,” said Lombardelli. “I walked in there and it was like being in heaven.” Lombardelli purchased rights to everything the archives hold, which so far totals 65 plans. (The archives are so dense, said Lombardelli, that they are likely to uncover more plans as time goes on.)

To turn her dream of building “new” Eichlers into a reality, Lombardelli needed a developer. That’s where Troy Kudlac of Palm Springs’ KUD Properties comes in. “I gave up a couple of times,” said Lombardelli, citing inflated estimates. “Modernism should not be that expensive—that’s what Joe [Eichler] said originally, that modernism should be experienced by everybody.” Kudlac agrees. He plans to build one or two Eichler-inspired homes in Palm Springs on spec. If all goes well, he’ll develop a small tract of about ten homes. “With something this kind of cutting edge and revolutionary, I’ve got to prove the concept,” said Kudlac. KUD Properties will submit plans to the city of Palm Springs by the end of March. They hope to break ground by mid-summer.

Lombardelli did not alter the plans except to meet modern building codes. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

Lombardelli did not alter the plans except to meet modern building codes. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

In the meantime, Lombardelli is fielding inquiries from developers in Tampa, North Carolina, Colorado, New Mexico, Brazil, London, and elsewhere. She’s resisted requests to alter the plans, except where modern building codes require it. “I think we really need to respect what we’ve been brought up with, what our history is,” she said. “There’s a soul in each of these houses that really resonates with me. To duplicate that is very difficult, but I think if you’re duplicating that to make them live on, we have to keep them the same.”

KUD Properties plans to build one or two Eichler-inspired homes in Palms Springs this year. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

KUD Properties plans to build one or two Eichler-inspired homes in Palms Springs this year. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

One Response to “Joseph Eichler’s Mid-Century Homes Reborn in Palm Springs”

  1. David Eichler says:

    “the developer whose architect-designed tract homes proliferated throughout Northern and Southern California…”

    At the risk of seeming pedantic, this description seems overstated to me. My grandfather built homes around the San Francisco Bay Area and in parts of the metro Los Angeles and Sacramento areas, but that is hardly throughout the state. Also, the word proliferate makes it seem as though he built vast quantities of homes, which he did not.

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