The Saga Continues: Congress Rejects Funding for Gehry’s Eisenhower Memorial

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
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Frank Gehry's design for the Eisenhower Memorial. (Courtesy NCDC)

Frank Gehry’s design for the Eisenhower Memorial as it stands now. (Courtesy Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

Despite earlier indications of progress, Frank Gehry’s design for a planned Eisenhower Memorial continues to encounter stumbling blocks. In November the US Commission of Fine Arts asked Mr. Gehry to make eight revisions to the proposal, a request that was then echoed and amplified in January when Congress turned down the Eisenhower Memorial Commission‘s request for $51 million in funding, a denial that was accompanied by a message imploring the architect “to work with all constituencies—including Congress and the Eisenhower family—as partners in the planning and design process.”

Mock-up tapestry panels for Gehry's Eisenhower Memorial. (Courtesy NCDC)

Mock-up of the controversial transparent metal tapestries. (Courtesy Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

The plan’s most prominent feature, large metallic tapestries depicting the landscape scenes from the former president’s childhood Kansas upbringing, has also proved to be its greatest sticking point. Some have suggested that the modern and outsize screens, coupled with the overall scale of the site, are not in keeping with Ike’s humble and traditional image. The design has produced enough indignation in some circles that the National Civic Art Society launched a new competition for the commission courting more classically conceived memorials. Others have responded negatively to the narrative painted by the memorial, suggesting that the emphasis on the man’s childhood found in the tapestries and many of the accompanying relief sculptures draw attention away from his later achievements as a public figure. Many of Eisenhower’s family-members have been particularly vocal in their opposition to Gehry’s vision. The closed process involved in the architect’s initial selection for the project has come under fire for being undemocratic.

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Relief sculptures depicting scenes from Eisenhower’s life. (Courtesy Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

The budget attached to the design has done little to assuage doubters, and Congress’ leaves the Memorial Commission with $30 million in the bank for a structure estimated to cost over four times that amount. Though Gehry is to have responded to the CFA’s request for adjustments, Congress was not impressed with the re-designs that bear a very close resemblance to their controversial predecessors. Some see more than a hint of ego in Gehry’s stubbornness; an unnamed official affiliated with the Memorial claimed the largely unchanged plans reflected “tremendous arrogance.” Responding to the latest development Representative Rob Bishop of Utah, chairman of the subcommittee on public lands and environmental regulation said, “To me this is very disappointing. It looks like tweaks here and there. It still means Gehry has not done what Congress asked him to do—to work with all the constituents, Congress, and the family.”

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(Courtesy Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

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