ZGF Builds a Suit of Armor for The University of Oregon

Envelope, West
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
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THE HATFIELD-DOWLIN COMPLEX SUGGESTS A COMBINATION OF GROUNDEDNESS AND AMBITION (JEREMY BITTERMANN)

THE HATFIELD-DOWLIN COMPLEX SUGGESTS A COMBINATION OF GROUNDEDNESS AND AMBITION (JEREMY BITTERMANN)

The glass, stone, and metal exterior of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex evokes the strength and agility of a college athlete.

The superhero and the Samurai. That’s where Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects (ZGF) began their design of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex at the University of Oregon. The football player, the architects imagined, is like Batman: stealthy and strong, he came to his powers not by supernatural accident, but through relentless training. At the same time, the athlete is a highly skilled warrior, the modern-day equivalent of Japanese military nobility. The facade of the new football training facility materializes these ideas in glass, stone, and metal. Dominated by horizontal expanses of tinted glass, it is powerful but not foreboding. ZGF offers the analogy to a suit of armor: the building’s skin balances protection and connection, solidity and agility.

THE WEST EXTERIOR (BELOW) IS PROTECTED BY A FLOATING SUNSCREEN (ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP)

THE WEST EXTERIOR (BELOW) IS PROTECTED BY A FLOATING SUNSCREEN (ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP)

The most direct expression of the armor metaphor is on the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex’s west exterior. In Eugene, the real solar challenge comes not from the south, but from the west, where the sun hovers near the horizon for long periods all winter long. To minimize glare, the designers placed a floating sunscreen across the western face of the building. Using elevation studies and interior models, they determined the optimal placement of a series of tinted glass panels held in an aluminum frame developed by Benson Industries. The result is seemingly random arrangement of overlapping rectangles, which ZGF’s Bob Snyder likened to scales on a Samurai’s costume.

On the other three sides of the building, ZGF installed a curtain wall of fritted, triple-pane insulated glass units supplied by SYP. The frit pattern was inspired by the nearby John E. Jacqua Academic Center for Student Athletes, which ZGF also designed. The Jacqua’s facade comprises two layers of glass, five feet apart with a stainless steel wire screen in between. At the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex, the designers achieved a similar texture on a single layer of glass. “We saw that as a microcosm of the five-foot wall [at Jacqua],” said Snyder. The frit pattern was developed to be visible from both outside and inside the building, and to suggest movement as one passes along the facade.

METAL PANELS AND TEXTURED STONE COMPLETE THE FACADE (ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP)

METAL PANELS AND TEXTURED STONE COMPLETE THE FACADE (ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP)

  • Facade Manufacturer Benson Industries, SYP, Western Tile & Marble, Streimer Sheet Metal Works
  • Architects ZGF Architects LLP
  • Location Eugene, Oregon
  • Date of Completion August 2013
  • System triple-pane insulated glass curtain wall with frit, floating glass sunscreen, stone, metal panels

The final components of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex exterior are stone and metal cladding. ZGF chose granite and basalt from Western Tile & Marble, which was treated with water jets for a striated texture. The designers used stone primarily on the first three floors of the building. “We established that as the stone zone, we wanted the weight of that material, the high durability of that material down low where folks would come into contact [with it],” said Snyder. Above, the stone transitions to aluminum panels for a lighter feel. “We worked with [Streimer Sheet Metal Works] to get the tightest radius we could get on the ribs of the metal panel,” explained Snyder. “We really struggled with that material [to make it] as fine as the stone, so it didn’t look like you were wearing tennis shoes with your tuxedo.” Plate-steel fins at the mouth of the parking garage and near the entrance sidewalk suggest the hard back of a dinosaur—yet another reference to armor.

For Snyder, the combination of materials on the building’s facade achieve a balance between groundedness and ambition. Like the athletes inside it, the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex remains tied to the earth even as it appears to float above it. “The idea is that to be really good at football, you need to be right on the edge,” said Snyder.

THE DIFFERENT MATERIALS ARTICULATE THE BUILDING'S STACKED VOLUMES (JEREMY BITTERMAN)

THE DIFFERENT MATERIALS ARTICULATE THE BUILDING’S STACKED VOLUMES (JEREMY BITTERMAN)

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