Forum or Wake? MoMA’s Expansion Plans Spark Debate

East
Wednesday, January 29, 2014
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Liz Diller. (Fran Parente)

Liz Diller. (Fran Parente)

Nearly 650 people crowded the auditorium at the Society for Ethical Culture on Manhattan’s Upper West Side on Tuesday to debate MoMA’s expansion plans, which include the demolition of the Tod Williams Billie Tsien–designed American Folk Art Museum (AFAM) building.

(Fran Parente)

(Fran Parente)

Organized by the Architectural League of New York, the Municipal Art Society, and the AIA New York Chapter, the event was packed with prominent members of the design community. MoMA Director Glen Lowry and chief curator of painting and sculpture Ann Temkin spoke of the Museum’s growing collection and their need to show art from the “immediate past,” the 20th Century, alongside art from the present, and cited large recent acquisitions like the Fluxus and Frank Lloyd Write collections. Liz Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro gave an earnest presentation, repeating her firm’s desire and lengthy investigations to save the Folk Art building, calling Williams and Tsien “admired colleagues.” Rectifying the alignment of the floors of AFAM with MoMA and creating easy circulation between buildings proved impossible, she said, without destroying the “integrity” of the AFAM building.

(Fran Parente)

(Fran Parente)

Cranbrook Academy director Reed Kroloff then led a panel discussion on the expansion plans. Former New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff dismissed the architectural merits of the AFAM building, calling it flawed, and comparing it to Edward Durrell Stone‘s Two Columbus Circle. Cathleen McGuigan, editor-in-chief of Architectural Record, called the building important and urged the Modern to move more slowly with their demolition plans. Columbia preservation professor Jorge Otero-Pailos said the problem called for a rethinking of what preservation means and about the particular qualities of the AFAM building (some of his work involves the senses, and he praised the “olfactory quality” of the AFAM building, while saying MoMA had “an airport smell”). Architectural consultant and writer Karen Stein questioned Diller’s assertion that circulation should be a defining feature of the project, and argued that MoMA had an obligation to the discipline of architecture to save the Williams Tsien building or some piece of it. Architect Stephen Rustow, who worked for KPF on the Taniguchi MoMA expansion, praised Diller, Scofidio + Renfro for addressing MoMA’s programmatic goals, but questioned if the institution had framed those goals too narrowly, thereby eliminating any possibility of saving the AFAM building.

Simultaneous to the action in the auditorium, an equally lively debate was happening on social media, with competing twitter hashtags, #MoMAConvo (promoted by the Modern) and #folkmoma (initiated by activists trying to save the AFAM structure). Several people on twitter questioned if the event was a forum or a wake.

Following the discussion, Lowry, Temkin, and Diller returned to the stage, and it became clear that the building’s fate is set. “Our decision has been made,” Lowry said. Responding to a question about the value of architecture versus art, Lowry underscored his point. “We don’t collect buildings.”

(Fran Parente)

(Fran Parente)

2 Responses to “Forum or Wake? MoMA’s Expansion Plans Spark Debate”

  1. jen g says:

    contentious is no adjective

  2. Thanks for reading. Corrected!

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