Edward Durell Stone House in Darien, Connecticut Under Threat

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Thursday, November 14, 2013
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Edward Durell Stone's American modernist home in Darien, Connecticut (Larry Merz)

Edward Durell Stone’s American modernist home in Darien, Connecticut (Larry Merz)

A house designed by Edward Durell Stone, located in Darien, Connecticut, is under threat of demolition to make way for a developer’s vision: a neocolonial pastiche home. The 2,334-square-foot home is sited on a 1.1 acre wooded lot in the private community of Tokeneke. The house represents a transitional moment in Stone’s multifaceted career. 

The home's great room features a double-height ceiling. (Larry Metz)

The home’s great room features a double-height ceiling. (Larry Metz)

Constructed for client Walter Johnson, an IBM executive, the house is one of only two Stone-designed homes in the Constitution State. Designed in 1953, the house marks a pivotal turn in Stone’s architectural career. It was the end of what is defined as his austerely modern, “hair shirt” phase, a term loosely borrowed from a monastic practice of wearing horsehair shirts as repentance. Secondly, this was the year that the famously drunk architect committed to sobriety, at the behest of his second wife. Finally, the Darien house was his final work to outwardly emulate Wrightian detailing, a practice that began with Stone’s visit to Taliesin in 1940.

Japanese stone lanterns adorn the yard. (Larry Merz)

Japanese stone lanterns adorn the yard. (Larry Merz)

“This is one of the last of father’s rustic vernacular homes that emulates the work of Frank Lloyd Wright,” his son, Hicks Stone, recently told AN. “The house is based on a dog trot house, which is common in the southern central U.S., but it’s a unique fusion of American vernacular and Wrightian style with Japanese elements.” Original finishes and detailing still exist in the home, such as textured rice paper shoji screens. Ornamental lighting and wood paneling also remains in good condition.

At press time, sale of the home through Halstead Properties had not been finalized.

The home's great room features a double-height ceiling. (Larry Metz)

The home’s great room features a double-height ceiling. (Larry Metz)

Textured rice paper shoji screens are original features. (Larry Metz)

Textured rice paper shoji screens are original finishes. (Larry Metz)

The home is sited on a 1.1-acre lot. (Larry Metz)

The home is sited on a 1.1-acre lot. (Larry Metz)

A family retains an original brick fireplace. (Larry Metz)

A family room retains an original brick fireplace. (Larry Metz)

The kitchen has retained its original finishes. (Larry Metz)

Original cabinetry is preserved in the kitchen. (Larry Metz)

One Response to “Edward Durell Stone House in Darien, Connecticut Under Threat”

  1. Albert says:

    Edward Durell Stone’s architect has been breathtaking. His creativity is phenomenal and all his projects are worth-noting. Sad to hear his house in Darien under threat.

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