Architect’s Plan Would Add A Bike and Pedestrian Tube to San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge

West
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
.
Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

Rendering of the proposed bike and pedestrian tube on the Coronado Bay Bridge. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

From the top of San Diego’s soaring 200-foot-tall Coronado Bay Bridge, architect Lew Dominy says you can see Mexico, but outside of special events when the bridge is closed to automobile traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists who might stop to admire the view are prohibited. Dominy, principal at San Diego-based domusstudio architecture, has a plan to build a tube through the distinctive archways of the Coronado’s support piers that would bring multi-modal access to the bridge.

The new pedestrian and bike tube fits inside the arch of the bridge's supports. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

The new pedestrian and bike tube fits inside the arch of the bridge’s supports. (Courtesy Domus Studio)

Dominy hatched the concept three decades ago while riding his bike across the bridge during a special event. “When you’re 200 feet in the air looking at the city, it’s just an unbelievable view,” Dominy said. At the time he was interning for the the Coronado Bay Bridge’s designer Bob Mosher, and developed an interest in the 11,179-foot-long span connecting the cities of San Diego and Coronado. Dominy shelved the proposal, but recently began promoting the concept anew.

Over the past six months, he has been meeting with officials from the US Navy, the Cities of San Diego and Coronado, the bridge’s owner CalTrans, and others to promote the idea and determine if the project is feasible. Dominy said the response so far has been positive. “With all the agencies and jurisdictions involved, this will take some time to become real,” Dominy said in an email. “But the momentum is building,¬†and we have gotten very positive responses everywhere we’ve been with the project. We think it could be an iconic draw for cyclists and runners and visitors to San Diego.”

The plan, estimated to cost around $50 million, calls for a steel cylinder to be built inside the 12-foot-diameter pier arches, with structural attachments to the bridge’s existing steel box girders. After speaking with engineers who retrofitted the bridge for earthquakes a decade ago, Dominy said “it appears from initial analysis that no extra support is needed” for the new bike tube. The bridge is built with a 4.7 percent grade, meaning the ascent and descent over the two mile length of the bridge fit within existing ADA regulations. Dominy said the tube structure would be open but include railings and other protections to keep people from falling or jumping. He said the design could also include viewing areas at various points with glass floors to heighten the drama of the view.

To move the project forward, Dominy hopes to raise funding for a feasibility study, that among other things, will help determine if adding the bike and pedestrian tube will impact clearances of large ships that move underneath the bridge.

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Leo Suarez / Flickr)

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Leo Suarez / Flickr)

The San Diego skyline from the Coronado Bay Bridge. (zemistor / Flickr)

The San Diego skyline from the Coronado Bay Bridge. (zemistor / Flickr)

San Diego viewed from the Coronado Bay Bridge. (John Pastor / Flickr)

San Diego viewed from the Coronado Bay Bridge. (John Pastor / Flickr)

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Nathan Rupert / Flickr)

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Nathan Rupert / Flickr)

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Kevin Baird / Flickr)

The Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego. (Kevin Baird / Flickr)

View from the top of San Diego's Coronado Bay Bridge. (KeyWestDavid / Flickr)

View from the top of San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge. (KeyWestDavid / Flickr)

2 Responses to “Architect’s Plan Would Add A Bike and Pedestrian Tube to San Diego’s Coronado Bay Bridge”

  1. manbot says:

    One of the beautiful things about the design of the Coronado Bridge, is that it seemingly disappears into the void of the sky. It’s modernist simplicity doesn’t detract from one of the most beautiful natural harbors in all of California. Unlike the “look at me” qualities of the Golden Gate, Bay & Vincent Thomas (LA Harbor) bridges, the Coronado bridge seems to almost disappear in to the void of the sky. While I think a pedestrian/bike link to Coronado is long overdue, I would hope that care and concern for the bridge’s original design principles are considered. I’m not saying I don’t like this project, I just hope that nothing is decided quickly and consideration of the structure profile will be examined closely.

    Former SD Native

  2. Hans Wangbichler says:

    Dark/cold, due to being under the roadway. Loud, due to being under the roadway. America’s finest Pigeon perch. Placing the route on top would cost a heck of a lot less money for our allegedly cash strapped city, make it more accessible for emergencies, and give bridge jumpers only one side to leap from.

Post new comment

Name (required)

E-Mail (required)

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License