Creative Corridor Plan Unveiled to Revitalize Little Rock

National, Newsletter
Friday, December 21, 2012
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Aerial view of Main Street's Creative Corridor (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Aerial view of Main Street’s Creative Corridor. (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Marlon Blackwell, architect and professor at the Fay Jones School of Architecture, and Steve Luoni, architect and director of the University of Arkansas Community Design Center, have unveiled a masterplan for converting Little Rock’s Main Street into a cultural center. The plan titled, The Creative Corridor: A Main Street Revitalization will include a pedestrian promenade, outdoor furniture, LED lighting installations, rain gardens, affordable living-units for artists and a renovation of downtown buildings for mixed-use. Luoni notes that execution is expected to occur in phases.

Looking Northwest into Capital Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Looking Northwest into Capital Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

The first objective is to separate the district from the rest of Main Street by using original lighting—potentially made up of old city street lights and composed into a light art installation—distinct landscaping, and purpose-built architectural pavement. The second phase plans to anchor the site at the intersection of Capitol and Main Street with a central public square containing an outdoor amphitheater and large LED screen reminiscent of Times Square monitors. The third phase hopes to densify the perimeters of Main Street with trees, rain gardens, terraces and a pedestrian promenade. The fourth is the creation of the transit district in coordination with the Metroplan’s scheduled expansion proposals and new bike lanes.

Looking South from the North Gateway Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Looking South from the North Gateway Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

As the project gets going, Little Rock’s Mayor Mike Studola plans to use the city’s EPA grant to create smaller-scale demonstrations of the ideas presented in the masterplan. Although the plan is intended to place Little Rock on the map of towns with unique urban designs, execution relies heavily on private dollars. In order to receive funding the location would have to draw crowds as an art center and Luoni has already discussed receiving support from various visual arts, film, dance and music organizations including the Arkansas Repertory Theater and Arkansas Symphony Orchestra.

Rendering of Capitol Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Rendering of Capitol Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

The presentation of “The Creative Corridor” was held at the Arkansas Repertory Theater and made possible by a $150,000 Our Town Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Upon earning the NEA grant Luoni commented, “The project has the potential to be a national model for consolidating cultural arts functions—artist housing, production spaces, galleries and performance spaces—as a catalyst for sustained urban development in downtown. We are proud that the NEA recognizes this potential and has directed resources from its signature grant program for this project.”

As of yet, funding for the full completion of the proposal has not been determined but Mayor Studola, architect Luoni and architect Blackwell remain on board to see it through.

Rendering of Capitol Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Rendering of Capitol Avenue Plaza (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Renderings of the Creative Corridor (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Renderings of the Creative Corridor (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

One Response to “Creative Corridor Plan Unveiled to Revitalize Little Rock”

  1. Marb says:

    Marlon Blackwell’s architecture is fabulous, as in, it keeps the rain off of people’s heads. There’s a reason every rendering of his projects is taken at dusk, because without dim lighting and an amber glow emitting from within, people might notice that they are looking at a convenience store writ large.

    Seriously, can we drop the charade that his buildings are anything other than post-modern crap that we will be tearing down in 20 years?

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