New York Presses Its Green Collars

East, East Coast
Friday, October 23, 2009
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Among the 30 green initiatives launched by Mayor Michael Bloomberg is more solar panels in the city, including the largest array planned for the Brooklyn Army Terminal. (Courtesy NYC EDC)

Among the 30 green initiatives launched by Mayor Michael Bloomberg is more solar panels in the city, including the largest array planned for the Brooklyn Army Terminal. (Courtesy NYC EDC)

If there is one thing the recession has taught New York, it’s not to put all the eggs in one basket. While Wall Street may not have collapsed as much as everyone feared—just look at those Goldman Sachs bonuses—the Bloomberg administration has been determined to diversify and strengthen the city’s economy in industries beyond FIRE. Programs in media and fashion have been unveiled recently, and yesterday, green collar jobs took center stage as the mayor announced 30 initiatives to create a foundation for sustainability jobs in the city.

The inside of the terminal, which is largely vacant today, though the city is trying to fill it with new industrial uses.

The inside of the terminal, which is largely vacant today, though the city is trying to fill it with new industrial uses.

The mayor has already taken steps in this direction with the well-known PlaNYC and the April announcement aimed at greening the building code. Now the city’s Economic Development Corporation will offer a range of incentives [full list, PDF], from tax credits to training programs to green business incubators, many of them targeted at the city’s building stock. There are tax abatements for green tech, “Solar Zones” where permitting will be easier, a wind turbine demo program, and educational opportunities for designers, contractors, amd building operators to create, install, and run such installations.

In addition to the Army Terminal itself, the citys pilot program will install PVCs on surrounding underutilized open space.

In addition to the Army Terminal itself, the city's pilot program will install PVCs on surrounding underutilized open space.

The most visible of these 30 initiatives is a massive solar array that the EDC will build atop the Brooklyn Army Terminal, a 4 million square foot industrial building on the Sunset Park waterfront. When completed, the 500 kilowatt will generate 750,000 kilowatts per year, according to the EDC, enough to power 150 homes and save the city $120,000 on energy costs in its Sunset Park buildings. But the real hope is that it will prove the viability of PVCs to the private sector so they will begin to proliferate across the city. An RFP for the project is expected in December.

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