Unveiled> BIG Joins the Supertall Ranks in China with Rockefeller Center-Inspired Tower

International
Monday, July 2, 2012
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Many details of BIG's supertall tower in Tianjin are still shrouded in mystery. (Courtesy BIG)

Many details of BIG's supertall tower in Tianjin are still shrouded in mystery. (Courtesy BIG)

Bjarke Ingels, architect of mountains, now has set his eyes on Everest. The New York and Copenhagen-based architect’s firm BIG has been tapped by the Rockefellers to design one of the world’s tallest buildings at 1,929 feet for a new commercial development in Tianjin, China, a city of nearly 13 million people. Ingels revealed a cryptic, fog-shrouded rendering of the tower on his web site—indicative of the scarcity of detail yet released on the tower—but this being the information age,  AN found more information and views of the tower on a clear day.

Rendering of BIG's planned supertall tower in Tianjin. (BIG/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

Rendering of BIG's planned supertall tower in Tianjin. (BIG/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

BIG is working with HKS Architecture and Arup to design the $2.35 billion Rose Rock International Finance Center set within an SOM-designed master plan for the Tianjin Binhai New Area Central Business District. The new commercial neighborhood to the southeast of Tianjin replaces a formerly industrial peninsula with a mix of high-rises, historic sites, and parks anchored by a high-speed rail station and helps to connect it to the coast.

Rose Rock Group, founded by Steven C. Rockefeller Jr., Steven C. Rockefeller III, and Collin C. Eckles, held a ceremonial groundbreaking on December 16, 2011 and is promoting the new tower as a key to transforming Tianjin into “the financial center of Northern China.”

Renderings show a terraced pyramidal tower with a palpable vertical thrust and clear reference to the Art-Deco stylings of its inspiration, the Rockefeller Center in New York. Just as the Rockefellers built ambitiously skyward in New York 80 years ago, Ingels said in a statement, “The Rose Rock International Finance Center will be to the contemporary Chinese city what the Rockefeller Center was to the American city of the 1930s: an architectural landscape of urban plazas and roof gardens designed to stimulate and cultivate the life between the buildings.” Only this time, over a thousand feet higher.

Rendering of BIG's planned supertall tower in Tianjin. (BIG/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

Rendering of BIG's planned supertall tower in Tianjin. (BIG/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

A model of BIG's supertall tower. (Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

A model of BIG's supertall tower. (Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

SOM's master plan for Tianjin Binhai New Area Central Business District. (SOM/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

SOM's master plan for Tianjin Binhai New Area Central Business District. (SOM/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

SOM's master plan for Tianjin Binhai New Area Central Business District. (SOM/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

SOM's master plan for Tianjin Binhai New Area Central Business District. (SOM/Courtesy SkyscraperCity)

6 Responses to “Unveiled> BIG Joins the Supertall Ranks in China with Rockefeller Center-Inspired Tower”

  1. Gary Sinese says:

    Gross. Another building designed from a 3D modeling program–not good architecture.

  2. eleonor says:

    this really sucks

  3. Johnston Park says:

    Nonsense! I think it looks pretty unique and really bold. The first pic truly reflects the pollution in China, and somehow it looks magical that way!

  4. Sky says:

    Very sculptural. Outstanding in a sea of mediocre and uninteresting.

  5. Yunos says:

    Ughhgly….come on BIG…..really?

  6. FitzCarraldo says:

    This might sound crass but this seems like a white Burj Kalifa massing model with pixelated articulation.

    might be the structural demands resulting in a similar structural system or buttressing.

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