Redlining the Panorama

East
Friday, July 10, 2009
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Caption TK.

Damon Rich (at rear) surveys the damage, as Michelle O'Brien looks on. (Photo: William Menking)

The Queens Museum of Art opened its latest exhibition Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center on Wednesday with a discussion of the mortgage foreclosure crisis in the city’s five boroughs. The event featured the exhibition’s designer Damon Rich, founder of the Center for Urban Pedagogy and now urban design director for the city of Newark; policy expert Sarah Ludwig; community organizer Michelle O’Brien; and urban historian Kenneth Jackson­—all tip-toeing around the museum’s famed New York panorama. For the exhibition the panorama—which includes every mapped block in the city—has been fitted out with orange triangles, their one-inch legs set above every block with three or more recent foreclosures. These foreclosures, according to museum director Tom Finkelpearl, depict a landscape of “displacement,” and the speakers addressed the origins of this crisis in the creation of redlining by the Home Owners Loan Corporation in the 1930s.

Caption TK.

Kenneth Jackson comments on Brooklyn's foreclosed properties. (Photo: William Menking)

The speakers emphasized that the current foreclosures and the predatory lending practices that led to the problem have overwhelmingly taken place in neighborhoods with large populations of African Americans and Latinos. The orange placeholders, for example, cut a huge swath through Bedford Stuyvesant and Brownsville/East New York to East Flatbush.

Jackson, contemplating the sea of triangles (representing over 13,000 foreclosures) in Brooklyn, described the magnitude of the problem, but pointed out that New York has been less affected by the crisis than cities like Detroit and Dayton, Ohio, because of its relatively vibrant economy and large population of renters. The exhibition itself details the history and material culture behind the current crisis, curated by Rich and Larissa Harris as “an experimental site for learning,” and will be open until September 27.

2 Responses to “Redlining the Panorama”

  1. stan Ries says:

    Tom Finkelpearl has done it again, making the Panorama relevant is a breillant idea Keep up the good work.

  2. California Dreamer says:

    This is a wonderful way to bring the housing tragedy into readily appreciable form. What would a panorama of Stockton, California look like – a lake of triangles with islands of stability?

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