Morphosis Computes a Facade for Cornell

Architecture, East, East Coast, Envelope
Wednesday, December 17, 2014
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Gates Hall's facade features stainless steel panels that mitigate heat loading. (Courtesy Cornell University)

Gates Hall’s facade features perforated stainless steel panels that mitigate heat loading. (Courtesy Cornell University)

The facade’s stainless steel panels form a wave pattern, cutting down on glare and heat loads while representing the contribution computing has made to design.

The recently completed Bill & Melinda Gates Hall at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, combines the schools’ Computing Science and Information Science departments under one roof. Designed by Morphosis, the facility encourages spontaneous interactions between these two disciplines with common spaces for comingling and transparent partitions that allow views, and daylight, to pass from space to space. The building envelope, a unitized glass curtain wall system, is wrapped in a band of perforated stainless steel panels that forms a dynamic, angular wave pattern across the surface. In addition to creating a sense of movement across the exterior, it serves as a fitting symbol of the contribution that computing has had on the arts and sciences: The architects used advanced digital modeling tools to design the geometry, pattern, and details of this additive layer, and made it to function both as an aesthetic gesture as well as a performance enhancing element of the architecture. “The goal was to establish a consistent level of daylighting throughout the interior,” said Cory Brugger, director of design technology at Morphosis. “We maximized the exterior glazing to get the light coming through. The design of the screen reduces the amount of glare and heat gain and starts to help with the performance of the facade system itself.”

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Product> Get Appy: Eight Digital Design Tools

DesignBoard_JavierGalindo_01b

(Courtesy Morpholio)

As all architects—particularly those of the belly bar and T-square generations—will agree, technology should be a design tool, not an end to itself. Building product manufacturers are among those on board with this point of view, and are developing apps that help users visualize possibilities, rather than dictate pro forma solutions. Like digital design consultants, these programs supply specific expertise, and leave the creative control in the architect’s hands. Here’s a few noteworthy examples.

Board
Morpholio

This digital mood board allows electronic design concepts to be populated with real-life architectural and interiors products from such sources as 3form, Herman Miller, Knoll, and more.

More after the jump.

Tex-Fab’s Rigidized Metal SKIN

Fabrikator
Friday, November 8, 2013
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University at Buffalo's Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano's 3xLT project won first place in Tex-Fab's SKIN. (Raf Godlewski and Stephen Olson)

University at Buffalo’s Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano’s 3xLP project won first place in Tex-Fab’s SKIN. (Raf Godlewski and Stephen Olson)

A structural, textured metal system wins first place in a competition and the chance to develop a façade with Zahner.

Reinforcing the idea that time fosters wisdom, Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano’s third iteration of a structural architectural screen was awarded first place in Tex-Fab’s digital fabrication competition, SKIN. According to Tex-Fab’s co-director, Andrew Vrana, the team’s 3xLP project was selected for its innovative façade system, which uses parametric design and digital fabrication.

The 3xLP designers’ exploration of the relationship between academia and manufacturing merged at the University at Buffalo’s (UB) Department of Architecture. Starting their collaborative research with a digital model, Bruscia and Romano solicited the help of local manufacturer Rigidized Metals, (RM), who helped realize the second stage of the project’s evolution with two thin gauge metals featuring proprietary patterns. “The project is important because we’ve partnered so closely with Rigidized Metals,” Roman told AN. “We’ve brought digital and computational expertise, and they’ve provided material knowledge for textured metal—it’s a reciprocal team.” Read More

Cory Brugger of Morphosis Redefines Performance at Facades+ Chicago

National
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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Cornell's planned campus on NYC's Roosevelt Island by Morphosis.

Cornell’s planned campus on NYC’s Roosevelt Island by Morphosis.

Anticipation is growing for AN and Enclos’ eagerly awaited Facades + PERFORMANCE conference, touching down in Chicago from October 24th to 25th. Leading innovators from the architecture, engineering, and construction industries will share their insights on the latest in cutting-edge facade technologies that are redefining what performance means for 21st Century architecture. Don’t miss your chance to join Cory Brugger, Director of Technology for Morphosis Architects, as he is joined by a group of industry specialists to lead an in-depth dialog workshop on expanding the idea of performance in the design, engineering, and fabrication of innovative building systems.

“Traditionally, performance has been defined in singular terms,” Brugger told AN, “but when it comes to delivering architecture, it can encompass everything from energy usage to fabrication technique. For us, performance is multifaceted and interdisciplinary. We have found that technology provides a platform for incorporating a variety of performance criteria in our design process, allowing us to create innovative architecture, like the Cornell NYC Tech project on Roosevelt Island.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Irving Convention Center Facade: RMJM with Zahner

Fabrikator
Friday, February 25, 2011
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The facade will develop a patina over time (Courtesy Zahner)

A new convention center in Texas is wrapped in a skin of delicate copper circles that appear to float in midair.

Located halfway between sister cities Dallas and Fort Worth, the Las Colinas master-planned community is an ideal place for the newly opened Irving Convention Center. It is also a natural setting for the copper facade that architect RMJM Hillier designed for the 275,000-square-foot, $133 million project. Fabricated by architectural metal and glass innovator A. Zahner Company, its angular walls rise from the ground like a sun-baked geological formation.

Read more after the jump.

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