Bjarke Ingels mum on whether Two World Trade is a staircase for King Kong

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

The biggest architecture news this week was obviously the unveiling of Bjarke Ingels’ design for Two World Trade Center. The dramatic departure from Norman Foster‘s original proposal envisions the tower as a series of stepped volumes that gesture toward One World Trade. But does the step-ladder design—easily climbable by giant monsters like King Kong—pose a safety risk for New Yorkers? One petitioner is pleading with Ingels to change the design.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

Watch One World Trade, New York City’s tallest skyscraper, rise in less than two minutes

One World Trade Center. (AN)

One World Trade Center. (AN)

With the recent opening of One World Trade Center, the folks over at EarthCam have reshared their 2013 timelapse of the tower’s 1,776 foot rise. There’s not too much else to say about the video, other than that it sure makes the building’s very long and arduous climb seem pretty quick and easy. It’s also set to some very Game of Thrones-y music, so it has that going for it too.

Watch the video after the jump.

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub begins to open up to the public

The PATH train's Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The PATH train’s Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

After all these years (read: delays), the public will finally be able to check out the grand oculus in Santiago Calatrava‘s $3.9 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub—starting next month.

Continue reading after the jump.

Norman Foster or Bjarke Ingels, who will be designing the final tower at the World Trade Center?

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster's design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

A few weeks ago AN noted that the Norman Foster–designed 2 World Trade Center might finally rise after all these years. The New York Times was reporting that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and 21st Century Fox were in talks to lease half the building for a joint headquarters. If it were to happen, wrote the Times, Murdoch’s team might bring in a new architect to update Foster’s design. Now it’s looking like that is exactly what’s going to happen—and it’s going to happen in an, ahem, BIG way.

Continue reading after the jump.

Thanks to Rupert Murdoch, Norman Foster’s 2 World Trade Center might actually happen

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Richard Rogers‘ long-stalled 3 World Trade Center finally climbing again, it’s concrete core rising steadily above its nearly-complete podium. Now, it’s Norman Foster’s turn to bring the last of the World Trade towers to life, and it might happen this time with the help of a media giant.

Continue reading after the jump.

Calatrava on the state of NYC architecture & his own controversial World Trade projects

The World Trade Center site. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The World Trade Center site. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The Real Deal recently scored an interview with Santiago Calatrava, the so-called “symphonist of steel” behind the upcoming (and wildly over budget) World Trade Center Transit Hub, and the nearby Saint Nicholas Church. In the interview, Calatrava explained how New York City’s building code impacted the two projects’ designs, offers his thoughts on the World Trade Center master plan, and comments on the construction quality of the Transit Hub. Overall, the controversial architect lavishes praise on just about everyone—from Daniel Libeskind to Larry Silverstein to the Port Authority.

Were the World Trade Center Transit Hub’s lateral struts part of the original Calatrava design?

Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

 

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub—or as its designer Santiago Calatrava likes to think of it, the “bird in flight”—is just blocks from AN‘s office, so we get to walk by and watch it try to take off regularly. But in the weeks before the holidays, odd “struts” started to be welded between the structure’s giant fins or blades.

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Eavesdrop> One Rat Center

East, Eavesdroplet, Skyscrapers
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
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one-rat-center

(Michael Tapp / Flickr; Montage by AN)

 

Speaking of One World Trade, Condé Nast’s highly publicized move-in did not go entirely as planned. According to Gawker, Vogue, which is occupying floors 25 and 26, had to delay the relocation of its editorial department due to an infestation of rats. The rodent problem was evidently so dire that the fashion magazine’s editor-in-chief, a one Anna Wintour, went so far as to issue an order to her staff that they must ensure her office is a rat-free zone before she sets foot inside.

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Eavesdrop> Not My Spire: Sculptor wants no connection to World Trade topper

(Anthony Quintano / Flickr)

(Anthony Quintano / Flickr)

Sculptor Kenneth Snelson is tired of having his name all over the derided spire atop One World Trade Center. It has been widely reported that Snelson consulted with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) on the 441-foot-tall spire that brings the tower to its highly symbolic height of 1,776 feet. But he said he was only peripherally involved in the early stages of the design and is not all that connected to what now towers above Lower Manhattan. Snelson said everyone involved in the design of the spire had the best intentions, but as for its final iteration, he’s no fan. “I don’t know why somebody doesn’t decide, ‘well, we should remove the spire,’” he said.

This beautiful photo of Lower Manhattan won SOM’s World Trade Center photo contest

Architecture, Awards, East, Skyscrapers
Thursday, December 11, 2014
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(Gerry Padden / Courtesy SOM)

(Gerry Padden / Courtesy SOM)

While the critics sure don’t like it, many other casual observers are big fans of Lower Manhattan‘s World Trade Center. This morning, SOM announced the winner its #WelcomeOneWTC photography contest it held to mark the grand opening of New York City’s latest controversy-laden skyscraper.

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Here’s how Santiago Calatrava’s New York City transit hub got its enormous $4 billion price tag

Architecture, Development, East
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
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Final rafter being installed on the Hub's Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Final rafter being installed on the Hub’s Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

With the final rafter installed on Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub the New York Times has done a deep-dive on how, exactly, the long-delayed structure ended up costing close to $4 billion. While the hub ultimately looks more like a stegosaurus than a dove taking flight, as Calatrava originally envisioned, it is undeniably a head-turning piece of dramatic architecture. But one that will be forever grounded by the reality of its staggering price tag.

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