Friends of the High Line President selected to lead World Monuments Fund

Joshua David. (Liz Ligon)

Joshua David. (Liz Ligon)

Joshua David, the co-founder and former president of Friends of the High Line, has been named as the new president of the World Monuments Fund (WMF). He will succeed retiring president Bonnie Burnham who has been in the role since 1985. The change is effective November 2nd.

For the last half century, the WMF has been working with its partners around the globe to protect and preserve architectural monuments from threats natural and manmade.  “Josh’s ability to marry collaborative restoration with community engagement makes him an excellent choice to lead World Monuments Fund into the 21st century,” Burnham said in a statement. “Based on his experience of working with preservationists and architects for the last 16 years, the Board unanimously agreed that he was the right leader to steward World Monuments Fund as we begin our next 50 years.”

For his own part, David said: “It’s critical that we continue World Monuments Fund’s vital work to preserve and steward sites of architectural, artistic, and cultural significance around the world. These sites connect us to our past and inspire us to build a better future. I’m honored to succeed Bonnie in leading World Monuments Fund’s talented team to carry out this essential mission.”

Culture at Risk: World Monuments Fund Watch List Includes Palisades, FLW’s Taliesin

According to the List, Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin Is in Danger of Disrepair. (Courtesy Casey Eisenrich / Flickr)

According to the List, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin Is in Danger of Disrepair. (Courtesy Casey Eisenrich / Flickr)

The World Monuments Fund has announced its 2014 Watch List for cultural sites at risk by changes in economy, society, and politics within their respective countries and disrepair due to natural forces. For 2014, the Monument Watch List, compiled and released every two years since 1996, has cited 67 heritage risks in 41 countries and territories around the world. These sites range from Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1911-built Taliesin home in Wisconsin, submissive to elements of weathering, to the tree-lined Palisades cliffs in New York and New Jersey, jeopardized by corporate construction plans, to all of the cultural sites of Syria, risked by current war conflict.

View the gallery of highlights after the jump.

Slideshow: Zonnestraal Sanatorium Saved From Ruin

International
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
.
Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Abandoned and nearly lost, the Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum, Netherlands has been meticulously restored to its former glory by Bierman Henket architecten and Wessel de Jonge architecten.  In honor of their efforts, the two firms were awarded the 2010 World Monuments Fund / Knoll Modernism Prize.  Alan Brake penned an article for the print edition of The Architect’s Newspaper:

Designed in 1926–1928 by Johannes Duiker and Bernard Bijvoet and completed in 1931, the sanatorium is considered a seminal work of early modernism. Though it was well known when it was built, the structure was eventually abandoned, and since then nearly subsumed by the surrounding landscape. Portions of the three-building complex were almost completely lost, so many parts of the sanatorium had to be meticulously reconstructed, including formerly mass-produced elements that had to be recreated by hand.

Read the entire article from The Architect’s Newspaper.

A gallery of before and after conditions after the jump.

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License