Sturgess and RJC Soar with Glass Skywalk

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Sturgess Architecture, RJC, and PCL Construction Management crafted a gravity-defying walkway for Jasper National Park. (Courtesy Sturgess Architecture)

Sturgess Architecture, RJC, and PCL Construction Management crafted a gravity-defying walkway for Jasper National Park. (Robert Lemermeyer)

Parabola cantilever walkway delivers park visitors to the brink.

Concerned that visitors to Canada‘s national parks were becoming increasingly disengaged from both the experience of the outdoors and the reality of climate change, Parks Canada launched a search for private-sector initiatives to reverse the trend toward drive-through tourism. Brewster Travel Canada answered the call with a limited design competition for a walkable structure in Jasper National Park‘s Sunwapta Valley. “One of the bus drivers suggested that we do something over this particular gorge, Trickle Creek Canyon—something that could be suspended off the side of the mountain that brought visitors into a more intimate relationship with the Athabasca Glacier and its melting,” explained Sturgess Architecture principal Jeremy Sturgess. With design-build team lead PCL Construction Management and structural engineer Read Jones Christoffersen (RJC), Sturgess’ firm crafted a cantilevered walkway that, clad in weathering steel and glass, defers to its natural surroundings while providing breathtaking views of the glacier and valley floor. Though not a facade itself, Glacier Skywalk warrants discussion within the context of high-performance building envelopes for its innovative structure and streamlined approach to materials—the “+” in Facades+.

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debartolo architects’ Weathering Steel Bicycle Gallery

Architecture, Envelope, West
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
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(Timmerman Photography)

Bicycle Haüs’s contemporary structural glass and corrugated steel envelope reflects the owners’ interest in cutting-edge cycling technology. (Timmerman Photography)

Glass and corrugated metal envelop a Scottsdale cycling shop.

When debartolo architects principal Jack DeBartolo 3 AIA first visited the site of Bicycle Haüs in Scottsdale, he knew it was exactly what owners Shasta and Kale Keltz were looking for. “In Arizona, with our very intense heat, we love it when we can unite two things: a northern orientation to maximize light without direct sun, and high visibility to the public way,” said DeBartolo. “When a parcel’s oriented like this, with its main side facing north, it allows us to do both things in one. We can build a glass facade for light and to advertise the contents, and it can also be a view building.” DeBartolo’s firm designed a wedge-shaped structure with a broad structural glass facade facing the street. The remainder of the building is clad in weathering steel, a low-maintenance material that taps into the desert aesthetic of decay and renewal. Read More

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