With some help from Gensler, ASLA to turn its headquarters into the Center for Landscape Architecture

The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has tapped Gensler and landscape architecture firm Oehme van Sweden to turn its Washington, D.C. headquarters into the state-of-the-art Center for Landscape Architecture. ASLA bought its 12,000-square-foot home in 1997 for $2.4 million and watched as its value increased to $6.9 million. Since the building was about ready for some fixing up, the society decided it was a good time to go ahead and truly transform it at a cost of $4 million.

Continue reading after the jump.

Los Angeles and San Francisco make bids to host the 2024 Olympic Games

Conceptual rendering of a revamped LA Coliseum and surrounding Expo Park (Southern California Committee For The Olympic Games)

Conceptual rendering of a revamped LA Coliseum and surrounding Expo Park (Southern California Committee For The Olympic Games)

After hosting the Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984, Los Angeles is in the hunt to be the Unites States’ candidate to host them again in 2024. Earlier this week the city made a presentation to the U.S. Olympic Committee, followed by pitches from Boston, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

Continue reading after the jump.

Night at the Museum II: Bjarke Ingels to re-imagine National Building Museum for new exhibition

Architecture, Art, East, On View
Thursday, December 11, 2014
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"HOT TO COLD" at the National Building Museum. (Courtesy National Building Museum)

“HOT TO COLD” at the National Building Museum. (Courtesy National Building Museum)

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is returning to the National Building Museum shortly after its hugely-popular, and highly-traversed maze installation in the building’s Grand Hall. This January, the museum will present what is essentially a retrospective on BIG’s work called HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation.

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Pictorial> BIG’s Smithsonian Master Plan Revealed

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

As AN reported today, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has unveiled its master plan master plan for the Smithsonian Institute’s south campus in Washington D.C. The $2 billion plan would transform multiple cultural destinations with new systems and facilities, and create a dramatic new public space. While the project isn’t expected to be fully implemented until 2041, you can scroll through the gallery below to get a sense of what the Smithsonian and BIG have planned. Learn more about BIG’s plans over here.

View the renderings after the jump.

New report predicts huge spike in tidal flooding for coastal communities

East, Sustainability
Monday, October 13, 2014
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Overflow at the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. (Flickr / thisisbossi)

Overflow at the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. (Flickr / thisisbossi)

It had been a few days—maybe even weeks—since we’d seen a new report about the devastating impacts of climate change, but, as expected, that short streak has ended. The latest end-of-the-world-type report comes from the Union of Concerned Scientists, and let’s just say there’s a reason these scientists are so concerned.

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Deborah Berke designing interiors at Washington D.C.’s Wardman Tower

Architecture, East, Interiors, News
Wednesday, September 24, 2014
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Deborah Berke.

Deborah Berke.

The historic Wardman Tower in Washington D.C. is getting an interior update courtesy of Deborah Berke. The New York–based architect has been tapped by JBG Companies to update all of the building’s interior spaces and its 32 private residences. According to JBG Companies, the renovation “will pay tribute to the opulence of mid-century Paris while adding an open and contemporary feel to the spaces.” If it wasn’t obvious, that’s code for: Expensive. As in, these condos will be very expensive—priced between $2 million and $8 million. According to the Washington Post, that could make the Wardman condos “the most expensive units ever to hit Washington.”

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Gehry unveils latest design for controversial Eisenhower Memorial in Washington D.C.

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Frank Gehry has offered up another design for his remarkably controversial Eisenhower Memorial in Washington D.C. The revised approach comes a few months after the National Capital Planning Commission shot down Team Gehry’s last design which included massive metal tapestries and columns that obstructed views of the capitol dome.

Continue reading after the jump.

With promise and pitfalls, Washington D.C.’s new Silver Line hopes to transform the suburbs

Tysons Corner station. (Flickr / tracktwentynine)

Tysons Corner station. (Flickr / tracktwentynine)

It finally happened. After decades of planning, five years of construction, and months of delays, Washington D.C.‘s brand-new Silver Metro line welcomed over 50,000 commuters for its opening weekend. The new 11.4-mile line, which includes five new stations, will ultimately connect the city to Dulles Airport in Virginia. That part of the line is scheduled to open in 2018. The Silver line, though, is more than an attempt to connect a city with its airport—it’s the latest, multi-billion dollar effort to expand a rail system, spur economic development, and create more walkable, pedestrian-friendly destinations. So, yes, it’s ambitious. And, yes, it was expensive. Continue reading after the jump.

After delays, new D.C. streetcar line hopes to open in November

A D.C. streetcar. (Flickr / Mr.TinDC)

A D.C. streetcar. (Flickr / Mr.TinDC)

After missing its 2013 deadline, Washington D.C.’s streetcar could possibly open this fall—that’s according to a source involved with the project. The in-the-know individual told American University’s radio station, WAMU, that the H Street-Benning Road line could be up and running the first week of November.

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Updating Washington, D.C.’s Mies van der Rohe Library

The Great Hall. (Courtesy Martinez and Johnson + Mecanoo)

The Great Hall. (Courtesy Martinez and Johnson + Mecanoo)

Earlier this year, the Washington, D.C. Public Library announced that Martinez+Johnson and Mecanoo had won their competition to design  the next phase of the city’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library.  Check out AN‘s coverage of the winning design here. The firm beat out two other finalists to revamp van der Rohe‘s iconic work. Here’s AN’s guide to the competition and the runners-up.

More after the jump.

Construction Starts on Massive Mixed-Use Development On the D.C. Waterfront

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

After  nearly a decade of planning, a $2 billion, three-million-square-foot mixed-use development is underway on Washington D.C.’s Southwest waterfront. In March, construction started on Phase 1 of The Wharf, a project that is being developed by Hoffman-Madison Waterfront and designed by Perkins-Eastman. The new neighborhood will have marinas, green space, entertainment venues, and plenty of retail, residential, and hotel space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bing Thom Architects Takes the Stage in Washington, D.C.

Envelope
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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Bing Thom Architects designed a 650-foot long timber-backed glass curtain wall to envelope three theaters. (Nic Lehoux/courtesy Bing Thom Architects)

Bing Thom Architects designed a 650-foot long timber-backed glass curtain wall to envelope three theaters. (Nic Lehoux)

A timber-backed glass facade provides transparency, acoustical isolation, and resiliency for a historic theater complex in the nation’s capital.

When the Mead Center for Performing Arts in Washington D.C. hired Vancouver-based Bing Thom Architects to double the institution’s square footage without disturbing two historic theaters designed by treasured architect Harry Weese, it was clear to firm principal Michael Heeney that standard solutions would not suffice. For one, the theater facilities were insufficient and outdated. More troublesome, however, was the fact that passenger jet liners taking off and landing at Regan National Airport across the Potomac River were so loud they were interrupting performances. The architects had to find a solution to mitigate this cacophony both for the existing structures as well as for the expansion—a new theater called Arena Stage.

“We had to achieve acoustical separation and isolation from exterior noise in a way that was respectful and maintained the integrity of the original structures,” Heeney told AN. Building off an approach that originated from a project in Surrey, British Columbia, the design team decided to wrap the triangular-shaped complex in glass with timber column supports, topped off with a 500-foot cantilevered roof. With the help of structural engineers at Fast + Epp and facade consultancy Heintges, the team extrapolated the Surrey solution to provide even greater transparency for the existing Weese theaters, Arena Stage, and a variety of mixed use spaces totaling 200,000 square feet. Read More

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