Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The Bjarke Ingels Group’s plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as “The BIG U” or “The Dry Line”—also became the competitions’s biggest winner.

Watch the video after the jump.

The view from this South Dakota TV Tower is as grand & dizzying as any Manhattan skyscraper

National, Skyscrapers
Monday, February 16, 2015
.

04-tower-vid

While here in New York City, the antennas we cover tend to sit atop skyscrapers like the World Trade Center, for much of the American landscape, the tallest fixtures are spindle-thin television towers that keep watch over an agrarian landscape. But the view from atop those towers can be just as beautiful as the view from a $100 million Manhattan penthouse, as this drone video proves.

Watch the video after the jump.

Video> Optical illusions come to life in Stanford designer’s mesmerizing 3D-printed zoetrope sculptures

Design, Technology
Friday, February 13, 2015
.
The petals appear to seethe up and down (Courtesy Instructables)

The petals appear to seethe up and down (Courtesy Instructables)

Nature’s algorithms reign supreme in a series of revolving 3D printed sculptures by designer-cum-artist John Edmark, also an adjunct lecturer at Stanford’s Department of Art & Art History. The sculpture sits on a rotating base and animates when it is placed under a strobe light or filmed using a camera with extremely slow shutter speeds.

Watch the video after the jump.

You’ll be hard-pressed to turn away from this twisting, morphing projection-mapped dome in Santa Fe

(Courtesy Ouchhh)

(Courtesy Ouchhh)

Visually and aurally mesmerizing, a new 3D projection by Turkish design studio Ouchhh immerses the viewer in a psychedelic, eye-of-the-storm experience of whirling fractals inside a darkened dome.

Read More

Video> Is open over? Talking office space design with Gensler, 1871, more

Architecture, Interiors, Midwest, News
Tuesday, February 3, 2015
.
Open offices, like the Toronto office of Bruce Mau Design, have come under fire in several recent studies. (Courtesy SparkCBC via Flickr)

Open offices, like the Toronto office of Bruce Mau Design, have come under fire in recent years. (Courtesy SparkCBC via Flickr)

Open offices have gone from unavoidable interior design trend to the target of some serious backlash. I moderated a panel last week for DisruptCRE‘s annual conference that tried to suss out what’s driving office space design and culture today.

Watch the video after the jump.

Video> James Carpenter’s glassy Meatpacking office tower on the High Line gets newly rendered

860 Washington. (Courtesy James Carpenter Design Associates)

860 Washington. (Courtesy James Carpenter Design Associates)

Last week, AN took a walk along the High Line to check in on all the new development happening right alongside New York City’s popular park. One of the structures we saw steadily rising was 860 Washington Street, a 10-story glass office building by James Carpenter Design Associates.

Watch the video after the jump.

Shanghai Talks> Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum on balancing dense development with open spaces

Postcard of Park Row, 1895. (courtesy The Skyscraper Museum)

Postcard of Park Row, 1895. (courtesy The Skyscraper Museum)

Last year I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall thinkers I interviewed was Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum.

Read More

Video> Bjarke Ingels sketches the future of architecture on the floor beneath his feet

Ingels explaining "Worldcraft." (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

Ingels explaining “Worldcraft.” (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

The film starts from above. We see a white canvas and not much more. That is, until Bjarke Ingels enters from the upper left hand corner dressed in all black. He tilts his head backward, addressing the camera perched above him, and speaks: “If documentary is to document our world as it already is, fiction is to fantasize about how it could be.” The starchitect adds “architecture is the canvas of our lives.” He then gets down on his hands and knees and starts drawing on the canvas below him. Okay, let’s back up.

Continue reading after the jump.

It’s Friday, so why not let this drone give you a birds-eye tour of New York City?

Screenshot from "Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!"

Screenshot from “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!”

We know, we know, we know—the internet is being overrun with drone-photographed, time-lapse videos of cities and ruins. They are like cat videos, or BuzzFeed quizzes, or thought-pieces on Hillary Clinton’s ground game in 2016: they’re everywhere and they’re unavoidable. But sometimes they’re pretty great. This five-minute video by Victor Chu is called “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!,” and, well, yeah, it kind of is!

Watch the video after the jump.

Video> Shanghai Talks: Mun Summ Wong of WOHA Architects

ParkROYAL in Singapore by WOHA. (HeyItsWilliam via Flickr)

PARKROYAL in Singapore by WOHA. (HeyItsWilliam via Flickr)

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Mun Summ Wong of Singapore-based WOHA.

Watch the video interview after the jump.

St. Petersburg, Florida flooded with proposals to transform its famous 1970s-era pier

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

About 10 years ago, the city of St. Petersburg, Florida started talking about tearing down one of its most well-known piece of architecture: a 1970s-era, inverted pyramid at the end of a city pier. The city would then replace that pier head with a more modern, but still architecturally significant, statement. So, a few years back, a design competition was launched, and it resulted in some of the most ambitious designs we’ve ever seen from a competition like this.

View the proposals after the jump.

Obama Library proposal calls for an enormous park over Chicago’s Eisenhower Expressway

(University of Illinois Chicago)

(University of Illinois Chicago)

A lush green park reaching over the Eisenhower Expressway. Bus rapid transit connections. Economic invigoration for the North Lawndale neighborhood.

Those are some of the visions outlined in the University of Illinois Chicago‘s proposal for the Barack Obama Presidential Library, made public Monday.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 2 of 2012345...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License