Video> Shum Yip Land’s Peter Kok on green skyscrapers and keeping East Asia’s skylines unique

Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Peter Kok, associate general manager of Shum Yip Land, the commercial property arm of Shenzhen Investment. Read More

Video> Historic hotel demolished to clear way for Detroit’s new Red Wings hockey arena

The abandoned Hotel Eddystone (left) and Park Avenue Hotel (right), near the Masonic Temple; Midtown Detroit. (Aidan Wakely-Mulroney via Flickr)

The abandoned Hotel Eddystone (left) and Park Avenue Hotel (right), near the Masonic Temple; Midtown Detroit. (Aidan Wakely-Mulroney via Flickr)

The implosion of an historic Detroit hotel on Saturday helped clear the way for a $650 million hockey arena that developers say will more than pay for itself in economic ripple effects, but critics see the demolition as the latest casualty of an ill-conceived scheme receiving public financing.

Continue reading after the jump.

See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

(Courtesy teamLab)

(Courtesy teamLab)

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics.

Continue reading after the jump.

Watch OMA partner Ellen van Loon and MAB Development discuss the de Rotterdam tower

(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy OMA)

Last September, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat invited me to serve as the special media correspondent for its Shanghai symposium, entitled Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism.

I conducted video interviews with dozens of architects, developers, building managers, and others on topics relevant to tall building design and sustainable urbanism. Among the many designers, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed were Jos Melchers of MAB Development & OMA partner Ellen van Loon. We discussed the design of De Rotterdam, an innovative mixed-use development that won CTBUH’s 2014 Best Tall Building award for Europe.

n Continue reading after the jump.

Every year, a community in Peru rebuilds this 230-foot suspension bridge out of local grasses

(Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

(Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

Every year, one of the world’s most tensile rope suspension bridges—straddling a 230-foot-wide canyon in Peru—is handwoven from dried grass. In deference to elemental wear-and-tear, the bridge is painstakingly reconstructed every year by Quechua-speaking communities on either side of the chasm in a ceremonial ritual lasting three days, always ending in song and dance.

Watch the video after the jump.

Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Thursday, June 11, 2015
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Rendering of Ando's 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

Rendering of Ando’s 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design.

Watch the video after the jump.

Ride Chicago’s new elevated park and bike path, The 606, with this time-lapse video

606

Scene along the 606. (Courtesy Steven Vance)

Chicago’s long-awaited bikeway and elevated park, The 606, opened last weekend (on 6/6, no less) to a rush of pedestrians and cyclists who were eager to test out the new 2.7-mile trail after years of planning, design and construction. The public park remains extremely popular in the sunny week following its debut.

More after the jump.

A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

At the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

City officials at the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.

COntinue reading after the jump.

If swoopy renderings weren’t enough, now you can fly through Zaha Hadid’s first project in Mexico

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

In mid-May, AN wrote about Zaha Hadid‘s first project in Mexico—a sprawling, 981-unit housing complex in Monterrey. The Esfera City Center development appears as a series of interconnected, almost pixelated, mid-rise residential buildings that are centered around a communal green space. And now it has a slick video rendering that sheds new light on the project’s design.

Watch the video after the jump.

AC Milan football club soon to call “world’s most innovative stadium” home

(Courtesy AC Milan, YouTube)

(Courtesy AC Milan, YouTube)

Italian football giant AC Milan is relocating to what the club purports as “the world’s most innovative stadium” in the city’s Portello area. The new mixed-use facility will be slightly over half the size of the team’s current 80,000-seater San Siro stadium, which it shares with fierce rival Intel.

Continue reading after the jump.

Have your LEGOs and eat them, too: Here’s how to make edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies

Design, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

YouTube vlogger Grant Thompson aka ‘King of Random’ recently broke the internet with a how-to video for concocting edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies.

Watch how after the jump.

Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

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