Here are the AIA New York’s 2015 Design Award Winners in architecture

Architecture, Awards, National
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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(Courtesy REX via AIA NY)

(Courtesy REX via AIA NY)

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year’s AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. “Each winning project, granted either an ‘Honor’ or ‘Merit’ award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique,” AIANY said in a statement. “Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere.” Take a look at the winning teams in the architecture category below.

View the winners after the jump.

On View> Shigeru Ban’s humanitarian architecture highlighted by the Dallas Center for Architecture

Architecture, On View, Southwest
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Shigeru Ban: Humanitarian Architecture
Dallas Center for Architecture
1909 Woodall Rodgers Freeway
Dallas, Texas
Through April 25

The Dallas Center for Architecture is presenting a selection of Pritzker Prize winning architect Shigeru Ban’s disaster relief designs. Ban’s humanitarian architecture has confronted some of the world’s most devastating natural and manmade cataclysms in the last 20 years. The Japanese architect is known for his pioneering designs for United Nations refugee shelters in the mid-1990s, using inexpensive and often recycled materials such as paper tubes and cardboard to make durable, shock-proof structures.

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After a year-long search, the Met chooses David Chipperfield to design the museum’s new wing

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced that David Chipperfield has been selected to “develop a new design for the Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art, and potentially for adjacent galleries for the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Just six logs keep this cafe warm and cozy in Buffalo, New York

Cafe Fargo in Buffalo, New York has no mechanical heating system. (Florian Holzherr)

Cafe Fargo in Buffalo, New York has no mechanical heating system. (Florian Holzherr)

Wintry Buffalo, New York is about the last place you might expect to find a building with no mechanical HVAC system. Yet that’s where a pair of architects fired up their custom-designed masonry heater, also called a kachelofen, which warms a contemporary cafe space by burning just six logs per day—even through a record-breaking winter where the average temperature was just 22.8 degrees.

Continue reading after the jump.

Washing your hands will never be the same with this award-winning faucet’s swirling lattice of water

(Courtesy Simin Qiu)

(Courtesy Simin Qiu)

If you’re trying to up your faucet game and new fixtures just aren’t doing the trick—we’ve got the perfect piece to impress your dinner guests when they visit the powder room. Simin Qiu, a student at the London Royal College of Art, has designed a faucet that releases water in an elegant latticework pattern. Finally, water from the tap won’t just lazily fall into your sink basin, resigned to its dreary passage into the sewers; it will do it with pizzaz!

Continue reading after the jump.

High Line designer James Corner tapped to design Miami’s “Underline” linear park

Beneath the Metrorail in Miami. (Flickr / Melissa Venable)

Beneath the Metrorail in Miami. (Flickr / Melissa Venable)

Just about every city on planet earth wants to build its own version of New York City‘s hugely popular High Line. The ever-growing list includes Miami that plans to turn a 10-mile stretch of underutilized land beneath its elevated Metrorail into a park and bike path. The project is called “The Underline” because, well, you get it.

Continue reading after the jump.

CetraRuddy’s latest New York City skyscraper goes curvy, slender, and cellular

242 w. 53rd Street. (Courtesy CetraRuddy)

242 w. 53rd Street. (Courtesy CetraRuddy)

The latest glassy residential tower to rise on Manhattan’s West Midtown comes courtesy of Cetra RuddyCurbed spotted renderings of the 625-foot-tall condo tower that is slated to rise on the site of the Roseland Ballroom, a beloved New York City concert venue that shuttered in April.

COntinue reading after the jump.

What does Frank Gehry have planned for Los Angeles’ Sunset Strip?

Architecture, West
Wednesday, March 11, 2015
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View of the project's site from above (8950 Sunset LLC)

View of the project’s site from above (8150 Sunset LLC)

We’ve learned from Curbed LA that Frank Gehry is designing a large mixed-use development on LA’s Sunset Strip called 8150 Sunset. Located on Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards, the project will be located on the site of an old estate nicknamed the “Garden of Allah.” (The lot now contains a strip mall.)

Continue reading after the jump.

Facade Alterations by Bruner/Cott Turn Steam Plant Inside Out

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Bruner/Cott renovated a 1925 McKim, Mead & White steam plant to create a new student event space for Amherst College. (David Lamb)

Bruner/Cott renovated a 1925 McKim, Mead & White steam plant to create a new student event space for Amherst College. (David Lamb)

Renovation transforms decommissioned McKim Mead & White building into campus event space.

When Amherst College decided to convert a former steam plant into a student event space, the choice likely struck some observers as odd. Designed in 1925 by McKim, Mead & White, the coal-burning plant was decommissioned in the 1960s; since the 1980s, it had been used as a makeshift garage for ground equipment.  The facade of the neglected building needed to be opened up to reveal its potential while respecting its good bones. “It wasn’t in great shape, but it wasn’t in terrible shape,” said Bruner/Cott‘s Dana Kelly. “Impressively enough, the school recognized that it had qualities that could be harnessed for a new student space.” The brick building’s industrial aesthetic was a particular draw, said Kelly, whose firm has spearheaded renovations at the nearby MASS MoCA (itself a former industrial complex) since the museum opened in 1999. For Amherst College, Bruner/Cott took a similar approach, balancing preservation and alteration to support the new program without disrupting the historic building’s essential character.

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Frei Otto Wins the 2015 Pritzker Architecture Prize

1972 Munich Olympic Stadium

1972 Munich Olympic Stadium. (Martina Oefelein / Flickr)

Frei Otto has been given the 2015 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The 89 year old architect and engineer known for his daring glass and steel superstructures including the 1972 Munich Olympic Stadium. Often compared to Buckminster Fuller, Otto experimented with tensile structures, new materials, and inflatable architecture, and went on the build major buildings including the German Pavilion at Expo ’67 and the roof for the Multihalle in Mannheim, Germany.

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This year’s architecturally inspired films at the 2015 Slamdance and Sundance film festivals

Still from Concrete Love. (Courtesy respective directors)

Still from Concrete Love. (Maurizius Staerkle Drux)

This year’s Park City offerings at the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals ranged from portraits of architects, a mayor with architectural dreams, a victim of the foreclosure crisis, those trapped in physical and dreamed spaces, and individuals exploring the cultural landscape. Always a harbinger of what is coming up, look out for these films and media projects coming to a screen near you.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn protestors use “light graffiti” to urge Bill de Blasio to fund long-promised park

(Courtesy Gothamist)

(Courtesy Gothamist)

As AN recently reported, a fire that destroyed a warehouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn has rekindled questions about a long-promised waterfront park. Back in 2005, Michael Bloomberg rezoned much of Williamsburg and Greenpoint leading to a surge in glassy towers. With those towers was supposed to come Bushwick Inlet Park, a 28-acre green space along the East River. But in the decade since, only parts of the park have been completed.

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