Video> Bjarke Ingels sketches the future of architecture on the floor beneath his feet

Ingels explaining "Worldcraft." (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

Ingels explaining “Worldcraft.” (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

The film starts from above. We see a white canvas and not much more. That is, until Bjarke Ingels enters from the upper left hand corner dressed in all black. He tilts his head backward, addressing the camera perched above him, and speaks: “If documentary is to document our world as it already is, fiction is to fantasize about how it could be.” The starchitect adds “architecture is the canvas of our lives.” He then gets down on his hands and knees and starts drawing on the canvas below him. Okay, let’s back up.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tired of the noisy Autobahn, Hamburg to kick off major highway-capping project

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The city of Hamburg is kicking off a massive effort to bury and cap two miles of a highway that cuts right through town. Fast Company reported that the $800 million project will create 60 new acres of green space which include “open meadows, woods, bike paths, community gardens, and tree-lined squares.” Capping the highway will also create space for about 2000 new homes, according to city officials.

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St. Louis offers the Rams a new stadium on the Mississippi—if they stay

(courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture)

(courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture)

St. Louis‘ NFL franchise, the Rams, left Los Angeles in 1994. Twenty years later they’re mulling a move back, but not without a fight from the residents of their new Midwestern home. Last week plans for a new arena on the banks of the Mississippi River upped the ante, promising Rams fans 64,000 seats and an open-air stadium designed by HOK and 360 Architecture that a city-appointed task force called “the crown jewel of the reinvention of St. Louis’ city center”.

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Product> Must-Spec Kitchen Equipment

National, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, January 13, 2015
.
Spec Sheet  
LEAD-elica-YE_1-copy

(Courtesy Elica)

From food storage and prep to cooking and cleanup, a kitchen’s function—if not its form—is determined to a large extent by the quality of its equipment. Here are some new and notable products to specify for the serious cook.

Ye
Elica

Ye is one of the first range hoods to be sheathed in Cristalplant, a polymer material that allows the creation of soft, fluid lines. The directional, double-suction vent is operated by remote control. LED spotlights illuminate the cooking surface. Designed by Fabrizio Crisà.

More after the jump.

Scaffolding comes down at Los Angeles’ Broad Museum, but the first impressions are mixed

The Broad, sans scaffolding (Gary Leonard)

The Broad, sans scaffolding (Gary Leonard)

Rarely has the removal of a building’s scaffolding caused as much hubbub as when Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s The Broad in Downtown Los Angeles removed its temporary covering on December 31, revealing its “Veil,” composed of 2,500 fiberglass-reinforced concrete panels.

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These eight interiors are the AIA’s 2015 Institute Honor Awards winners

Beats By Dre. (Jasper Sanidad)

Beats By Dre. (Jasper Sanidad)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2015 recipients of its Institute Honor Awards, which it describes as “the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design.” This year’s 23 recipients were selected from out of about 500 submissions and will be honored at the AIA’s upcoming National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta. Here are the winners in the interior architecture category.

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Were the World Trade Center Transit Hub’s lateral struts part of the original Calatrava design?

Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

 

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub—or as its designer Santiago Calatrava likes to think of it, the “bird in flight”—is just blocks from AN‘s office, so we get to walk by and watch it try to take off regularly. But in the weeks before the holidays, odd “struts” started to be welded between the structure’s giant fins or blades.

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Here are the winners of the AIA’s 2015 Institute Honor Awards in architecture

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2015 recipients of its Institute Honor Awards, which it describes as “the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design.” This year’s 23 recipients were selected from out of about 500 submissions and will be honored at the AIA’s upcoming National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta. That event will be keynoted by former President Bill Clinton. Now onto the winners in the architecture category.

View winners of the AIA Honor Awards in Architecture.

Review> A Disciplined Approach to Misbehaving Urbanism

Mr. and Mrs. Andrews of Shadrach Woods, Freedomland. (Krumwiede)

Mr. and Mrs. Andrews of Shadrach Woods, Freedomland. (Krumwiede)

Keith Krumwiede’s Freedomland, an exhibition of architectural misfits, suburban follies, and developer nightmares, that just closed at the Princeton University School of Architecture Gallery, defies easy categorization. The pulse of the work is strong, its intention clear: to satirize the cringe-worthy packaging and wholesaling of a particular strain of the American dream of mass-produced, individualized suburban living by Toll Brothers and others through a series of reconfigured catalogue house plans.

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It’s Friday, so why not let this drone give you a birds-eye tour of New York City?

Screenshot from "Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!"

Screenshot from “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!”

We know, we know, we know—the internet is being overrun with drone-photographed, time-lapse videos of cities and ruins. They are like cat videos, or BuzzFeed quizzes, or thought-pieces on Hillary Clinton’s ground game in 2016: they’re everywhere and they’re unavoidable. But sometimes they’re pretty great. This five-minute video by Victor Chu is called “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!,” and, well, yeah, it kind of is!

Watch the video after the jump.

Hotel that inspired The Shining wants you to design its 10,100-square-foot hedge maze

The Shining maze.

The Shining maze.

If you haven’t seen or read the entirety of The Shining then you’re going to want to fix that right away—like, right now. Use the time you would have spent reading this 225-word story with, say, watching the two-and-a-half hour film. It’s great; you’ll love it. Okay, with that disclaimer out of the way, let’s continue. You’ll want to continue.

Continue.

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